abcess or boil on rabbit neck, have questions....

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by BamaSuzy, Nov 8, 2005.

  1. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    One of my big English Angora rabbits has some sort of abcess or boil on his right neck....it is about the size of a quarter but all rounded out....it has like a bloody place down the middle and seems to feel kind of solid...

    I took him out of his cage to trim the hair around his face yesterday and found it....I had not taken him out of his cage but once since he was trimmed about a month ago....last week he ran around on the grassy area in the old goat fence where the ducks are temporarily living....

    He seems otherwise in good health and responds to petting and is still eating and drinking....but this thing looks awful....

    In my past ten years of rabbit raising I have never seen this before.

    Would it be better if I deadened it with ice or something and then lanced it???? it just looks so uncomfortable. I can't found anything in my rabbit books about it.

    I washed it off with peroxide twice yesterday and put antibiotic cream on it after each wash. Today I've put antibiotic creme on it twice.

    anybody else had experience with this???? any suggestions? I usually "doctor" my rabbits myself only getting an antibiotic from the vet if one has the snuffles....most of them are healthy until they die of old age....

    He is such a sweetie and I don't want him to suffer....he doesn't jump too much when I put the medicine on it and he lay really still on the bathroom counter when I was washing it with the peroxide..,..
     
  2. Tarot Farm

    Tarot Farm Well-Known Member

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    I have seen this before and I am about 99.9 percent positive that it is what the old timers called 'wolves'. It is caused by a larva that is growing inside the sore spot. It will keep getting bigger and bigger until the larva matures.
    I breathes through the little air hole in the skin. It has to be removed or the rabbit will die. The best thing to do is to take it to a vet if possible. Do not kill the larva inside the rabbit's skin. Or do not break the larva while trying to get it out either; both will usually cause a loss of the rabbit.

    Cats and rabbits get these things more thatn other animals do. Usually around the neck and they are very painful to the animals.

    After the larva is removed, you can cleanse the area with peroxide about thre times daily. I have a little tool that I made to remove them with. If the hole is open big enought to uncurl the larva and get it out, I do them myself.

    Some people call these larva 'warbles'. But the old folks down South called them 'wolves'.
     

  3. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    I looked yesterday when I cleaned with peroxide and it doesn't seem to be a "wolf." (We adopted a kitten a few years ago that had a wolf and the kitten died.) But I will check again when I go to the barn in a few minutes. Thank you for your information!

    I typed in rabbit abcess into a search engine and got several ideas on how others had lanced them and then cleaned with peroxide and gave oral antibiotics as well.

    I will check this morning and see how he is doing and then make a decision on how to treat.

    Any more suggestons???? :shrug:
     
  4. Tarot Farm

    Tarot Farm Well-Known Member

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    I have seen more and more of the wolves in small animals over the past couple of years. The last one that I had to remove was from a little Angora kitten that had one on it's belly. I had to remove it and treated it with peroxide three times a day until it healed from the inside out.

    To lance it your self, this is what 'I' would do if it were 'my' rabbit. I am not stating this for any other reason other than to explain what I would do in this case if a vet was not an option (this is to clear myself for any legal stuff that might occur). There are two choices of how to do it. One is to put the rabbit's head and feet in towels, so it cannot kick out or scratch you. Have an able bodied assistant to hold it down on a flat and non-slick surface.

    Trim the hair away as much as possible and clean it with betadine/iodine solution. Then, make either a slash cut or an "X" cut to drain the infection out. This is so that it will heal from the inside out. You can use a sterile saline solution to wash the infection out with; using an sterile syringe without the needle attached. Then dry with sterile gauze and apply a light coating of antibacterial cream/ointment to keep the dirt out, but still allow it to drain if necessary. Clean at least twice daily with warm water and treat with peroxide, as needed.

    Good luck! I am still looking for rabbits to raise!
     
  5. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If it was an abcess it would be real white in the middle, sort of like a giant pimple. I had one old doe that had a real problem with an abcessed hock. Turned out that there was a bone chip in the foot.