Aaaaarrrrrgggg!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Kee Wan, Sep 3, 2006.

  1. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    Seems that my maters have blight again. I lost the entire garden last year.

    I thought I was doing it all right.....I mulched, I trimmed so that leaves were nowhere near the ground, I watered from below (but it rains ya' know?) I did everythign that I read to keep it from my plants....

    SO, last night - I was out there and I stripped every leaf that even looked like it was spotted. Maybe I can still get maters.....

    So - my question is, can I still get seeds from maters that are from a plant that had blight?

    I did take and save seeds from some of my plants, but some have not yet given any fruit..like my Croation Heart.....

    Anyone got any more help for blight.....

    THanks
     
  2. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Kee Wan, that's the pits!

    I don't recall: you're Zone 4 or 5?

    Have you gotten any fruit at all? How far along are the plants?

    I understand that "blight happens" and there's not a lot you can do about it. Around here, it generally occurs toward the end of the season (about now). I usually get at least a bit of it every year toward the end of the season, but not before I've had a fairly decent crop.

    Never had a problem saving seed, no matter what happened to the plant itself. Whether that's a good thing or a bad thing, I don't know. It's just the way it is for me.

    I'll be interested in reading the other responses about this.

    Pony!
     

  3. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the Dying Tomato Plants Club! Doesn't always have to be blight in the North since we're suffering more from septoria than anything else here. Either one, doesn't take long before the plants are almost bare.

    You will find that the plants are more than likely not entirely dead. The tips will still be alive and producing a few new leaves. The fruit will still be OK to use for eating or seed saving. As long as there is life in that plant, it will fight to ripen that fruit. There may be a lot of sun scald but otherwise the fruit should be normal.

    Although I don't have any which were dead before ripening fruit, some varieties may as well have been pulled several weeks ago. By coincidence, one pair happened to be Croatian Heart but those two each produced at least 20 pounds of fruit. There are certain others which would appear to have almost every leaf from day one. Black Cherry, Aunt Gertie's Gold, Medford, Garden Peach, Greenbush Italian, and the Wisconsin 55s, both red and gold version. Those could still be growing when snow falls if I wanted to protect them from frosts.

    Martin
     
  4. wvpeach1963

    wvpeach1963 WVPEACH (Paula)

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    You should only save seed from mature healthy fruit.

    Just ripe not over ripe is the way I dry out seeds.

    The blight should not matter as long as you get some mature fruit from which to take seeds.

    I save seeds from a fruit so pretty I want to eat it, but resist and save seeds from that pretty ones. LOL
     
  5. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    I still have LOTS of fruit. I'm goign to get maters. All my plants in teh garden are 7-10 feet tall (if I were to actually measure - they are NOT growing that height) and are draped over anythign that I can get near them to keep them off the ground.

    THe blight was just starting - I just happened to be checking some maters to see if I could pull them (I've been pulling at first blush because I've ben having LOTS of trouble with cracking and such...) adn ripen on the porch - and I noticed that there were spots.....

    SO I went on a trimming rampage - and cut all the spotted parts off....still have LOTS of good leaves - and hopefully plenty of good maters.

    Lets see...I have gotten some Polish Linguisa, Cherokee Purple, Purple Russian, Black cherry, some of those insanely sweet little bitty things that you get at Shopko (and grow by the billion) and Marianna's Conflict...What I have not gotten any of yet are the Croation hearts and the German Red Strawberry.

    What happened was they set fruit - adn that has ripened - but then we had that heat wave - adn they didn't set any fruit forever - now they are setting more.

    The plants in the garden are the ones with Blight - those in planters are fine.....Growing well - adn hopefully going to give me good fruit...but they are really late.....the heat got htem, I think...

    Oh - and talk about good fortunes.....I was at the farmers market today - and some poor guy had dropped a bunch of maters and bruiesed them - cracked some...upshot is that I got about 35 pounds of maters for $5. So - I've been canning all day.....:bouncy:
     
  6. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    WVPEACH reminds me of another which seems to be somewhat resistant to ailments here this year. That's West Virginia 63 which thus far is no worse off than WI55 for foliage loss after the soggiest August on record. But then, WV63 has WI55 as one of the parents or grandparents and thus should have the resistance which both would have received from Redskin.

    Martin
     
  7. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    I'm really embarassed to ask, but, what is blight? :eek:
     
  8. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    In short, one day you have a tomato plant with nice green leaves from the ground to the top. Less than a week later, the only thing which looks alive may be the tip of the vines. If it's early blight, which is most common, plants live and lose most of the leaves but the fruit is OK. If it's late blight, same thing but the fruits rot and the plants lose all of the leaves. Late blight is very uncommon and caused by an entirely different fungus.

    Martin
     
  9. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    THANKS all - I was just envisioning that I would have to go begging seeds from everyone who has already doled them out....

    Wonder why the plants in the planters have no blight (but they were the ones that got that whateve rit was this spring that I had to spray for) and the ones int eh garden have it?? THe dirt is from the same place - adn the mulch adn so on was exactly the same too.....

    Oh, well.....at least I got waht I needed - adn if all goes well - I will get all teh fruit off that has already been set - adn that shoudl proove to be a good plenty!!

    Thanks all!!
     
  10. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Remember I mentioned that the lower leaves of my black krim seemed to have died off? I'm not sure if it is a disease or a watering error, or possibly a late death of leaves due to earlier stress during the heat wave last month. I'm wondering if it might be the 'foot rot' on this page about blights that I found. You won't be able to answer that but I thought this was an interesting resource.

    http://vric.ucdavis.edu/veginfo/commodity/tomato/tomatodisease.html