A thorny thing

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by Dahc, May 5, 2006.

  1. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

    Messages:
    1,358
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Location:
    GA
    I have this thorny thing coming up in areas that I cleaned of other weeds. Right now they are about 10" high and they have a low growing, upright habit (I have seen them grown before). The thorns are about 1/4" or longer and they are straight. It has purple flowers with a bright yellow inside and the leaves have kind of a ruffle on the edge and are 1-3" long.

    Anyone know what that might be? Later I'll post a link to a pic.
     
  2. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,117
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Location:
    France
    I think they're related to artichokes...feed em to the rabbits, they love em.
     

  3. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

    Messages:
    1,358
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Location:
    GA
    I have no rabbits, just chickens, dogs, cats and quail.

    Here are some pics:

    Pic 1
    Pic 2
     
  4. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,117
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Location:
    France
    That's the one. A small thistle relative. Chard family, I think.

    Maybe try steaming the young ones, and eating them with buttr, salt, and pepper.

    Ever consider rabbits?
     
  5. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

    Messages:
    1,957
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana - North Central
    We call 'em ground cherries.
     
  6. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

    Messages:
    1,957
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana - North Central
    It's correct name is horsenettle.

    the berries are poisonous.

    DO NOT EAT THEM OR ALLOW CHILDREN TO EAT THEM.
     
  7. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

    Messages:
    1,358
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Location:
    GA
    We considered rabbits several years ago but our diet has changed considerably since then. Now we wont eat things with paws.

    I guess that's a good thing... our dogs are now safe... lol.

    I'll search along those lines but if anyone remembers a common or scientific name, I would sure appreciate it.
     
  8. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

    Messages:
    1,358
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Location:
    GA
    Hmmm... No, I don't think it's related to thistle or the Chenopodiaceae (chard) family. The flower petals are all connected and it opens up into a five pointed star. All of the thistle I viewed had hairlike petals and are structured completely different.
     
  9. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

    Messages:
    1,957
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana - North Central
  10. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

    Messages:
    1,957
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana - North Central
  11. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,283
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2003
    Location:
    Southern Maryland
    Just in case Gailann wasn't loud enough :)
    It's Solanum carolinense aka horsenettle.
     
  12. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

    Messages:
    1,957
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana - North Central
    dude, they weren't listening and the plant is dangerous...

    :shrug:
     
  13. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

    Messages:
    1,358
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Location:
    GA
    I had not re-loaded the page while I was looking at photos so I did not see your response Gailann... I see it now...lol.

    Thank you for the reply and the info. I appreciate it.
     
  14. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

    Messages:
    1,957
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana - North Central
    ain't no big thang. Just didn't want you or your kids to get in trouble...

    I actually have wondered for YEARS what the plant was. Was gonna make jam out of it.

    Glad I never did...
     
  15. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,117
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Location:
    France
    Maybe I shouldn't have suggested eating it, after all....I won't do that, ever again!
     
  16. mihal

    mihal Peterfi Mihal

    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2006
    Location:
    MO
    As above i5 horse nettle. Paste Of berries useful for curing Mange.
     
  17. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    442
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2004
    Its the genus Solanum. There are many common species. Some, such as nightshade, are poisonous.
     
  18. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

    Messages:
    1,358
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Location:
    GA
    Are you kidding me? Mange? How is it applied? I know a woman who took in a few dogs that were abandoned but the dogs had gotten mange pretty bad. She has really dumped some money into trying to fix those dogs up but she just can't beat it. I think she has sense enough to mess with it without poisoning herself... or the dogs.

    What is done to make it useful, do you know? Just berry paste?
     
  19. soulsurvivor

    soulsurvivor Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    12,678
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    Location:
    KY

    oh that hit my funny bone. I'm a veggie eater and have always thought of it as not eating anything that has a brain.
     
  20. skruzich

    skruzich Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    873
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2003
    Location:
    Georgia
    Horsenettle isn't poisonous, it is medicinal and can be dangerous in a overdose.

    Horsenettle
    Botanical: Solanum carolinense (LINN.)
    Family: N.O. Solanaceae
    ---Synonyms---Bull Nettle. Treadfoot. Sand Brier. Apple of Sodom. Poisonous Potato.
    ---Parts Used---Air-dried ripe berries, root.
    ---Habitat---United States of America. This weed is a hardy, coarse perennial, found growing in waste sandy ground as far west as Iowa and south to Florida.

    ---Description---Bears orange yellow berries which is the most active part of the plant, they are glabrous and fleshy, with an odour like pepper, taste, bitter and acrid.

    ---Constituents---Probably Solanine and Solanidine and an organic acid.

    ---Medicinal Action and Uses---Sedative, antispasmodic; has long been used by the Southern negroes in the treatment ofepilepsy; is a useful remedy in infantile convulsions and menstrual hysteria, has no unpleasant effects, but its usefulness is said to be limited, unless given with bromides.

    ---Preparations and Dosages---Fluid drachm three times a day. Berries are given in doses of 5 to 60 grains. Root, 10 grains.