A question or 2 about Cherry Trees.

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by BrahmaMama, Apr 22, 2006.

  1. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    I have a cherry tree in my yard, it is full grown. It blooms nice in the spring but rarely produces fruit (not surprising), last year I got 1 cherry! :p
    Any way these are sour cherries (VERY sour).

    Here's my dumb question ~
    If I plant 2 sweet cherry trees near it, will they cross pollinate to produce something inbetween that is at least good for making pie filling?

    Another dumb question~
    What should I spray it with and when? (bugs aren't a problem) but I don't know what 'dormant spray' is for really.

    TIA. :)
     
  2. btai

    btai Well-Known Member

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    I have another cherry question. I saw in a Stark's catalog that some of the sweet cherry trees can be grown as far south as Zone 8. I've never heard of fruiting cherries this far south. Is it possible to grow sweet fruiting cherry trees in Georgia?
     

  3. IowaLez

    IowaLez Glowing in The Sun Supporter

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    For making pies, sour cherries are used. Sweet cherries are for eating fresh. Your tree needs a pollinizer to set fruit. Cross-pollination with a sweet cherry will have no effect on fruit flavor. The flavor comes from what variety it is to begin with. Cherries need a cold spell in winter in order to fruit properly the next Spring. If you can grow apples or pears, you can grow cherries. If you have Spring frosts during bloom time you may not get a good fruit set, either. Choose a later blooming variety if this is a problem. I would also get one that is semi-dwarf, as the trees can get quite big and picking fruit can be difficult.
     
  4. lacy

    lacy Member

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    I have 1 sweet and 1 sour cherry tree. Both are self fertile, though this is the 1st year the sweet cherry has actually bloomed, its 10 years old. I've never had a problem with my sour cherry producing fruit. You might want to watch and see if you have any bees or other pollinators buzzing around. The lack of any might be part of the problem. Also, I've never sprayed my trees, my biggest problem is birds eating the fruit.
     
  5. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    Good advice thank you! I don't think the pollenating is the problem, there are lots of bees, wasps and butterflies around here. I think it's just been neglected (my bad).
    Thanks again! :)
     
  6. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

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    I bought a house with a Rainier (at least I think it is anyway - the one cherry I found had one that coloring). It got no cherries last year (we were here in July) because there is no pollinator. We planted a Bing - but darn it! The Rainier has flowered already and the bing has not. Anyone know of a better variety that will flower sometime in between?

    Kids
     
  7. 3ravens

    3ravens on furlough-downsized Supporter

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    Bramamama,
    All the bees in the world won't help if there is no pollen from another tree to fertilize your blossoms....plant another cherry tree that flowers about the same time. Since you want eating cherries, plant a sweet cherry tree.
    kidsngarden...... maybe the extension office guy? or someone in your area with an orchard? could help you. Maybe look online and see if your tree is an early, mid, or late flowerer, and get something to match?
     
  8. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    Some Cherry are self fertile read the posts above. Even they would benefit from cross pollination though.