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AFKA ZealYouthGuy
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Does anyone know about regulations to do with reloading shotgun shells? Can you reload them and sell them? I am sure the govt. needs to have it's hand in on this, does anyone know of regulations or the such? Does anyone reload their own shotgun shells that is a member of this board?
 

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If anything the fear of lawsuit would make it not worth it to me. Think of all the old worn out and unmaintained shotguns of granpas that will get some of those shells. By the way I load several hundred a year for me and the boys for hunting and skeet
 

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Regulations or not......anyone would have to be a complete fool to sell "reloaded" shells of any type.....mainly because of liability. If someones gun explodes while shooting one of your "reloaded" shells, guess who they will be coming after? The fact that you made a perfectly good reload......means nothing.
 

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Check link below for your answer. Specifically, see answer H4 on page 22.

Relevant ATF FAQ

My dad has been an FFL for 30 years. Reloading, of any type, is generally a low profit, high risk (liability) line of work. You never know what someone you sell to will do with your reloads. Reload your own shotguns shells to your heart's content, but don't do it for anyone other than your immediate family.

Do you have specific questions about reloading shotgun shells? You asked if anyone here reloads their own. I have been doing so for years. Let me know if you want any information.
 

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AFKA ZealYouthGuy
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Discussion Starter #5
Stush said:
Check link below for your answer. Specifically, see answer H4 on page 22.

Relevant ATF FAQ

My dad has been an FFL for 30 years. Reloading, of any type, is generally a low profit, high risk (liability) line of work. You never know what someone you sell to will do with your reloads. Reload your own shotguns shells to your heart's content, but don't do it for anyone other than your immediate family.

Do you have specific questions about reloading shotgun shells? You asked if anyone here reloads their own. I have been doing so for years. Let me know if you want any information.
Wow, thanks Stush that is EXACTLY what I was looking for. Good information. What is your average cost per reload. I know that's a pretty broad question, so how about a small game load for 12 and 20 guages. Equipment wise, if you are just sticking to shotgun shells, what would be a good setup to start with?
 

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ZealYouthGuy said:
Wow, thanks Stush that is EXACTLY what I was looking for. Good information. What is your average cost per reload. I know that's a pretty broad question, so how about a small game load for 12 and 20 guages. Equipment wise, if you are just sticking to shotgun shells, what would be a good setup to start with?
That is a really broad question. Are you only intending to use your reloads for small game hunting? Or do you also shoot sporting clays or trap or skeet? Maybe small game includes days in the field dove hunting where you could burn through a box or two of shells a day? Unless you are burning up a lot of shells - say 100 rounds or more per week, reloading shotgun shells is not going to save you tons of money.

For example, an average factory fresh 1 5/8 oz 12 ga field load is going to cost about $0.30 per round. If you buy shells by the case at Walmart when they are on sale, you may be able to buy this same shell for $0.25 or even a little less. To reload this round, it will cost you approximately $0.18 - about a 40% savings off the full retail price. Sounds great, right? I simply figured the raw cost of components - the wad, primer, powder and shot. I did not figure the tax, shipping, etc. With those figured in, the real cost per round probably goes over $0.20. Plus, I calculated the component costs based upon large quantity purchases. 5000 wads at a time. 1000 or more primers at a time. 100 lbs of shot. 8 lb of powder. Now, if you shoot 100 rounds per week that works out to be a $520 savings over the course of a year. But then again, you did not subtract the initial cost of the reloading press and other misc equpiment yet.

Lets say that you only shoot one box of shells per week on average. In that case, reloading your own only saves you about $130 per year. Subtract the cost of a modest press and you probably break even the first year - not counting your time.

If you want to reload for the satisfaction of doing it yourself AND saving a modest amount of money in the process, I say go for it. Don't, however, simply do it for the cost savings. If you want to proceed, I would suggest a MEC press. Best value for your dollar, and many can be had for bargain prices if you find one used at a gun show or on ebay.

Let me know if you have any more q's. Glad to answer if I can.
 
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