A question about fruit trees root stock

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by ChuckinVA, Dec 11, 2004.

  1. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    I received a catalog in the mail today that had root stock for sale in it. My dad has several apple trees on his place in West Virginia that I would like to grow here in Va. The trees were planted by my grandparents over 50 years ago. My question is this. Could I purchase the root stock and then graft the Wv trees to it? Would I need to do it there or is there a way to protect slips that I take off the Wv trees to get them back to Va for grafting ? Is root stock usually shipped in a container ? I could start them in Wv but the deer are pretty prolific and I don't know how well they would fare with out any one around to keep the deer off of them. ( Dads been trying to grow Chestnut trees there for about 20 years and they keep eating them. )
     
  2. byrdzeye

    byrdzeye New Member

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    Your slips, called scions, must be dormant and grafted to an actively growing rootstock to ensure success. Harvest the scion wood from 1 year old water sprouts about 3/8 inch in diameter and cut into 6-8 inch lengths in late February. Bundle and wrap in a moist paper towel, sphagnum or sawdust and store at 32 to 36 degrees until the rootstock has started to grow, usually in May. Don't seal the scions in plastic or they will rot and don't ever let them get warm or the buds will break and it will be worthless.

    The rootstock should have leaves the size of a squirrels ear when ready to graft. (Rootstock is shipped dormant/bareroot)

    Another option is to bud graft, done in August, no storage necessary.

    You need to do a lot of research if you want to successfully graft. This will answer most of your questions. Most is available on extension web sites. Timing is absolutely critical.
     

  3. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    Thanks,
    And welcome to the forum. So the scions are harvested from the trees I want to propogate in February and then grafted to the activley growing rootstock in May. In the meantime the scions must be kept at a temperture between 32 -36 degrees? I guess a small refrigerator that is never opened might be able to achieve those temperatures ? The root stock is planted either in the ground or a large container until spring and until the Scions are grafted to it ?
    I'm just trying to get a mental picture.
     
  4. byrdzeye

    byrdzeye New Member

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    Thanks for the welcome.

    You got it.

    Your everyday fridge should work just fine. The warmest your fridge should be is 40. Recomended fridge temp is between 35 and 38. The 32-36 is an industry optimum for storage. Mother nature isn't as exacting in her requirements. I just checked mine and its very close to 32, thermometer could be off though.

    Did you know - The original golden delicious apple tree was discovered in WV.
     
  5. Ray_Scheel

    Ray_Scheel Well-Known Member

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    The back of the fridge towards the bottom should stay in that range.
     
  6. Shagbarkmtcatle

    Shagbarkmtcatle Hillybilly cattle slaves

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    And the Grimes Golden apple came from WV too. I mix the Grimes Golden and Golden delicious apples to make a applesauce that is sweet without adding extra sugar.
    We have tons of different apple trees all over our WV farm. Some are delicous and some don't really have any taste at all. I would like to be able to identify them though.

    Laura Lynn
     
  7. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    I think my mom calls this apple an early gold.