A new perspective look at the Dachshound breed.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by r.h. in okla., Sep 26, 2004.

  1. I just watched a show on pbs about the dachshound breed. Before I always thought they were just a good for nothing house dog that people pathetically treated as a baby. After watching the show I found out the dog was bred for actually hunting Badgers over in Europe. The reason for the short legs/long body. They showed here in America of people having field trials of rabbit and rat hunting with the little poochies.

    Well now I have a interest in them and seeing what kind of hunting we could possibly do around here. But if I do come up with a pooch or two, they still have to sleep outside where all dogs and cats belong.
     
  2. tat

    tat Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    Let me know how it works out! My dogs are constantly bringing huge rats out of the pasture. I never see them when I have a gun, or else my dog has already has it in his mouth. I would like to get a dog that would find the rat and then back off and let me shoot it! Sounds like fun


    Tommy
     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

    Messages:
    28,248
    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    SE Missouri
    The standard doxy is my favorite breed. And if I ever get another dog, that is the one I will have. I had one in Mississippi yrs ago and he cleaned out all the armadillos. They had dug HUGE burrows all over the property I was buying and he just went down and dealt with them. He wasn't trained for hunting. I bought him for companionship. Doxies make good house pets because they are clean and don't shed much. They are also very alert and when barking sound like a much larger dog, and are protective of their family.
     
  4. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    15,981
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2004
    Location:
    Michigan's thumb
    If you look at photos of these dogs from long ago, you'll see that they had short legs, but not the short legs of today. They simply had shorter than normal legs. Be careful when getting your doxie. They have back problems because they have been bred to have longer than normal vertabrae, and therefore a weak back.
     
  5. Pops2

    Pops2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,840
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2003
    Location:
    UT
    if you can get hold of full cry magazine there is a regular column from a lady that works her dachshunds on a variety game with hawks & lurchers. if you're interested PM me & i'll give you the E-mail published in the magazine.
     
  6. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    960
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    The standards are actually wonderful hunting dogs- I believe in Germany there is a size one larger than our American standard dachshund. They were originally bred to hunt BADGERS- armadillos and rodents are NOT a problem for them, and even the minis tend to be pretty good ratters.

    Pops2 already mentioned the articles in Full Cry, but there's also fairly regular ones in the newsletter for the Dachshund Club of America.
     
  7. JulieNC

    JulieNC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    441
    Joined:
    May 29, 2002
    Oh, yes--the wonderful badger dog.

    We've always had a mini dachshund--an all-around superior animal. My current mini, Beatrice, is admittedly a spoiled lap dog, but she earns her keep. She's forever finding voles for me, and in the house, she's a mouser. (I'm deathly allergic to cats, so Beatrice's hobby is a welcome one.)

    Obviously, being a mini, she'd be useless against a badger or for any serious hunting, but it's fun to see that the hunting instinct hasn't been completely bred out. I would say that if you are interested in hunting animals that hang out in holes, a regular-sized dachshund would make a nice dog.

    Regarding the bad backs, it's true--there is a tendency towards weak backs. We limit our dachshund's use of stairs and don't let her jump on furniture.
     
  8. Queen Bee

    Queen Bee Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    6,700
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2004
    Location:
    NC
    I have had Doxies for 30+yrs and they are wonderful dogs! They are smart and will "train" you given the chance! :haha: My last male (died last Aug.) was h--- on mice, rats and moles. For 17yrs, I had a small standard/large mini female who would not back down to a copperhead (or any other kind of snake) she would alert me if she got the scent of a snake and would dig,move rocks or small logs to get to one.. She prevented me from stepping on one in the garden, twice. She also caught a coon in the coop and killed it (while I went to get the gun). She was not yappy as some are but very protective of the chickens, geese and our kids...She was spoiled rotten and a little over weight but she earned her keep more than once.. If you decide to get one and are going to leave it outside or in the barn, may I suggest that you get a wired-haired one.. They do have several coats and colors and the wired haired ones would do better in cold weather.. Debbie
     
  9. mimsmommy

    mimsmommy Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    I have to weigh in on this subject, as we bought a mini-doxie, Bratwurst, as our trial "baby" (i.e. can we feed and care for something, and deal with crying in the night, etc.. ;) ) when we were first married. He is the smartest dog either of us has ever owned, and we had both grown up with dogs. He was house broken in a matter of weeks, and on his own initiative would bring the leash to us when he wanted to go out (still does). He understands so many words, we started spelling them (like bed, let's go to the ..., bath) but now he has figured out what those are too! He has great problem solving skills as well. He has never damaged any of our daughters copious toys in the house, but give him a toy and tell him it is his (esspecially if it squeaks) and it is guaranteed shredded bits in about 10 min flat.

    He will chase anything that runs though, and we are concerned when we move to a bigger property and get some chickens and other livestock that he will have a stroke trying to get them. Once he is chasing something, it is nearly impossible to dissuade him. He just goes into hunt mode. I have been told that is one of the good/bad things about the breed--they are fearless, chasing prey without regard to whether they are big enough to take it down--and once in they don't let go(we have found this out the hard way with stolen fried chicken.)

    We love him though, and he is a great guardian against approaching strangers. Mostly he is a 11lb lap dog, but he is very tolerant of our dd and other children and has been a great companion.
    mimsmommy
     
  10. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

    Messages:
    3,736
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Location:
    VT
    My mother bred these dogs for years... and you don't know the half of "attack dogs." These are also HOUNDS. And they hunt in packs. One day our neighbor's attack trained "protection" dog, a full sized German Shepherd, jumped over our 5' high fence and landed smack in the middle of our pack. 1 Alpha male, 1 lactating female dog, and one female dog with her weaned puppies, as well as various and assorted other hanger's on: 12 of these little dogs in all.

    They shredded the Shepherd. Tore into that thing like no tomorrow. Every time the shepherd turned to protect its flank, the pack on the other side tore into it. My mother was terrified to beat the dogs off because she couldn't pull them all off and to safety at once, and she knew the only way they were going to survive was to fight as a unit.

    The Shepherd endured what seemed like a terribly long time of this before finally managing to break away and leap back over the fence. The vet bills were, apparently, quite substantial, but the dog did survive.

    You think they're fun in ones and twos? Get a dozen!
     
  11. beelady

    beelady Member

    Messages:
    24
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    I used to hunt deer over corn and soy. The guy who owned the farm taught his little doxie to blood trail deer. He was able to get through thickets really well because of his size. He was a great little dog. Did his job well.
     
  12. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,685
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2003
    Location:
    Bel Aire, KS
    Try to get European or German bred standard dachshunds..they have longer legs and shorter back...but they tend to be wirehairs. I've done research and there's a breeder in Killeen near me. I live in Austin, TX and have been wondering about their ability to bay wild boars. I've seen a mini and a standard bay boars and it was quite an experience but it was in a bay pen not in the woods which is a big difference. Good luck.

    Ted

    p.s. I happen to really like wirehairs myself.
     
  13. I didn't realize their were different breeds of dachshounds until I watched the pbs show. I think I will look futher into the wirehair breeds to use for hunting. I guess they must be crossed with the wirehair terriors to some degree. Airdale's were always one of my favorites.
     
  14. brosil

    brosil Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,112
    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2003
    Location:
    Ohio
    They're good on woodchucks too.
     
  15. reese

    reese Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,994
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2004
    Location:
    NO VA
    I have the most adorable little dox-box (doxy sir=boxerbitch=my girl)

    She is a German bread dog, has longer legs, shorter body, and the muscles and some markings of a boxer, she BEAUTIFUL! :D

    She will protect us like nobody's business, even moreso than the shelties I had growing up. She is a barker, but that's what they do. She is an awsome mouser, and was so proud of her first catch. She's 9 now, getting up in her years, but still acts as if she is 3.

    These dogs are diggers, and I've caught her trying to nip some of my hens tail feathers, but she's still getting used to them(have only had them a week).

    I like her short hair, so easy to care for and no hair flying around the house.

    As long as you understand the traits of the breed, and that you can't "beat it out of them" (rolling eyes, this is what her previous owners were trying to do) then it is a nice dog to have around imo. BTW, when she is gone, no more doxies for me ;) just too yappy for my husband although I'm greatful (and I'm sure he is too) for her protectivness.
     
  16. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    960
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Oh yeah- interesting link which is only somewhat relevent

    deerwatch.org - tracking program to find injured deer during hunting season in NY- most of the dogs involved are wirehaired dachshunds.

    Cait