A Lurker Come Out

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Lazy J5, Jan 21, 2005.

  1. Lazy J5

    Lazy J5 Member

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    Hi everyone. I just wanted to take a moment to introduce myself. I have been a lurker on this wonderful forum for a long time. My dh and I live in the mountains of central Colorado. We raise polled Dexter cattle, have two Belted Galloways bred to one of our Dex bulls, and recently purchased a Holstein/Dexter heifer (thanks Christina, she's wonderful!). I milk a Dexter every year and we raise steers for beef. Also have chickens, muscovies, brown Chinese geese, a red heeler, and cats. I was a vet tech for 10+ years, but now just tend my own critters at home. Dh owns a tire store in the nearest town, as he says, "Every farm needs a nurse cow." I do the bookwork for them. A couple years ago I completed the courses at the Colorado Institute of Taxidermy. It makes a great home based business.

    I have never lived in a town or near a big city (I think I spent half my childhood on a school bus). I can't really relate to all the folks who wish to leave the city for the countrylife, but I can sure understand why they want to.

    Anyway, I just wanted to say Howdy and hope to make some new friends here.
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi there Lazy Lurker. Come on in. We can use a good calf Doctor. How is the Taxiderming going? That does sound like an excellent side line for a boonie lifestyle. We all look for something that will put some change in our pockets without leaving the homestead. I too was born in a farm house in Ind. and have never lived in town. It don't seem like I'd know if I liked town living or not, but there is no question in my mind about it. Keep a close watch on the cow forum. There are emergencys poping up there all the time. Glad you are here. Uncle Will.
     

  3. COUNTRYDREAMER

    COUNTRYDREAMER Member

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    Welcome Lazy J! I have been reading for some time as well too, but have posted a few times. Well, I must say I am envious of both you and Uncle Will. I have always lived in/near the big city of Indianapolis, and it is such a huge dream of mine to be out in the country! I know I'll be there some day, so for now I learn all I can from wonderful forums such as this one and wonderful magazines such as Countryside and MEN. I'm glad you decided to post and I'm sure you will be of help to many here. Diane :)
     
  4. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    welcome and ready for some heated talks
     
  5. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Welcome, pull up a chair and join right in!
     
  6. crashy

    crashy chickaholic goddess

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    Welcome Lazy J !!! Heated talks??? What you mean? I thought this was all funnin and stuff. LOL I guess you can either get heated or just laugh I will laugh. Even tho I have been heated myself a time or two. Anyways welcome and I hope you learn a lot and have a good time with everyone I know I really enjoy this forum. :)
     
  7. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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  8. margo

    margo Well-Known Member

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    welcome in. There's a lot of good info here, as you know, and very helpful advice in just about any homesteading area you can think of.
    Me, I stay out of the "hot" discussions for the most part, just because. Something for everyone here.
    Have a great stay. :) .....Margo
     
  9. Lazy J5

    Lazy J5 Member

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    Thanks for all the warm welcomes. I knew there was a reason I wanted to join. I'll think I'll stay out of the heated discussions, but will enjoying reading them. It's very easy to have a heated talk here at home. I'm interested in getting a breeding trio of Nigerian Dwarf goats and dh is absolutely NOT interested. He was not impressed when I mentioned that I could probably trade a Dexter heifer for a the goats, but maybe someday...

    Uncle Will, the taxidermy is a good home business, but I don't make what I could at it. I like to do my own pieces for resale, and I don't have a regular taxidermy shop. I get calls all the time around hunting season and could have several full freezers if I said yes to them. But, I don't want to hassel with customers and deadlines. Also, I like to spend lots of time on the habitat bases for the mounts, and most taxidermists don't have time for that. I do it for the artistry end of it and would get very bored doing deer and elk heads all the time. I also paint and things, and a taxidermy shop would very quickly become full time. No thanks!!
     
  10. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    A big, hearty hello to you from GA. :)
     
  11. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Hi neighbor, welcome to the forums. I'm in the next state east, so will try to be neighborly.

    I really wish that I had more first hand knowledge about Colorado. I haven't spent much time there other than when skiing, which I haven't done for a number of years now.

    I do have deep Colorado roots however, a great great uncle (Folsom Dorsett) and his maternal uncle (Charles A. Lawrence) had one of the first four cabins in Denver, Kansas Territory. Uh, you do know that about half of Colorado used to be Kansas don't you? I get a real snicker when I see those bumper stickers that say "Native Coloradoan". I think me too. lol. Some of the Dorsetts purchased and operated "The Elephant Corral" for a few years before selling it. It was an early Denver hotel/livestock/salebarn of sorts.

    My great grandfather is shown in 1860 newspapers as hauling blasting powder to the mines.

    Later my grandfather worked as a teamster hauling freight in the Leadville area, circa 1880s.

    From all I read in Colorado history books, Colorado certainly had an exciting youth.

    Please tell us, what does the Dexter/Belted Galloway look like? Does it retain the belt? What about coloring? Hm, think I'd toss a Hollywood movie star into the cross so that the belt might have sequins on it. lol. What amount of milk do you get with each milking? How about butcher weight on the steers? Sounds great, I hope you will post more about them.

    Again, welcome to the forum. I'll try not to tease you too hard in the future.
     
  12. Natureschild

    Natureschild Well-Known Member

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  13. Lazy J5

    Lazy J5 Member

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    Hi Windy in Kansas. My hubby was raised on a farm near Oskaloosa, KS, so maybe he's a Colorado native, too. He'd love to hear that. Interesting history about your grandfather. I'm about 40 miles south of Leadville and we go up there quite often. Small world.

    The Galloway belt is a dominant gene, but is not always a carbon copy of the parent's belt. Somtimes is has a spot in it or doesn't go all the way around. I like the sequins idea, though. All the Dexter cross ones that I have seen have been black and white, but my two are bred to a dun bull, so we'll see. Mine are small, about 46" at the hip, not much larger than than bigger Dexters. I selected them because they were a bit smaller. Hoping to get a couple of Dexter sized heifers with nice belts. Haven't slaughtered any yet. I usually get right around 400 pounds of beef in the freezer from my Dex steers, which is just right for the two of us and some to share with our families. All grassfed and wonderful.

    I don't milk my cow in the "traditional" way. I let her keep her calf, then when I want milk, I separate them the night before, milk the cow in the am, and turn them back out together. I usually milk 2 or 3 days a week. More if I'm making cheese, less if I'm really busy or have to go somewhere. Works out great and I don't have to find a cow sitter if I leave. I get a gallon per milking this way. Yes, she drops her production with this method, but it's worth it to me to have the flexibilty, and I have a healthy calf that I don't have to hand raise.

    Thanks for the welcome and come visit sometime. We aren't usually too hard on you "flatlanders". :haha:
     
  14. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Welcome Lazy,

    Are you close to Buena Vista? I bought some property east of Salida last year and look forward to eventually making a homestead there. I'm opposite you, in that I have always lived in a city. Now I long to leave.

    Best Regards
    Gary
     
  15. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    That's an interesting way of milking, any sanitary issues? I like this method as it would allow me to be lazy about keeping a cow and getting a cow sitter like you say...
     
  16. Lauriebelle

    Lauriebelle Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Arkansas
    Hi Lazy!! Welcome to the forum!

    I got a little breathless reading your posts because ...though I was born a flatlander, my heart lives in the mountains!!! I lived in Colorado twice as a child and my husband and I lived in Buena Vista as newlyweds. We have missed it desperately since we left. We will possibly be moving to Fort Collins early this summer! Woooo Hoooo! It may not be the Collegiate Peaks...but I'll take the foothills over nothing...lol!

    Happy to meet you!! Also...I would live to see some of your work! Do you have a website or online album? I'm sure that many of us would love to see your artistry!!!

    Take care! ~Laurie
     
  17. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    One of the most interesting taxidermy works I have ever seen was that of a stubble duck. They remind me greatly of the famed jack-o-lope.

    The stubble duck bears the body of a ringneck pheasant, the head of a mallard duck, and the webbed feed of a duck. When done correctly the result leaves no doubt that the species have interbred and produced this unusual creature.

    Speaking of flatlanders, the last time I skiied I was making it down the mountain for the last time as the lifts had closed. I came across a rather large lady that was down, so stopped to see if she needed assistance. Otherwise it would have been quite a while before the ski patrol cleared the slope and she would have gotten help. Yes, she couldn't get up and needed help. Her legs were uphill and she had been trying to pull herself uphill to get up.

    Anyway, she was from Georgia, said she had skiied before, but had never SEEN mountains so large and so high. I don't know what she might have skiied on before, but I figure it was about like the one ski area in Kansas that has around a 300 foot drop from top to bottom. Flatlander indeed.

    I strained my knee so hard in pulling her up that it was ballooned up the next morning and I've not been skiing since.

    Thanks for the invitation. I currently work a part-time job so have no money left over for travel. However I do expect to do some in a few more years.
     
  18. Lazy J5

    Lazy J5 Member

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    Location:
    Colorado
    Laurie and Gary, OH MY GOSH, what a small world!! I am 8 miles south of Buena Vista on highway 285 toward Salida. Gary, where in general is your property? I grew up in Howard, 15 miles se of Salida on Hwy 50. My folks still live there and I go down there a lot, it's about a 40 minute drive.

    Laurie, I have started a website for my studio, still working on it. It's:
    www.chalkcreek.homestead.com

    Windy, I'd love to see a stubbleduck, too funny.

    Zealyouthguy, I haven't had any sanitary issues with milking this way. I keep her udder clipped, clean her well before milking. I use a strip cup and mastitis test cards. I don't know if this would work with a very heavy milker like a Jersey, never tried it. I know of a few other Dexter owners that do this, too, and haven't heard of any problems. In fact, one of them shared her experiences with me and that's why I decided to give it a try . After milking Jerseys for years, it's a really nice change.
     
  19. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum Lazy J. Glad you decided to join in! :D
     
  20. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Lazy J

    You have a nice web site, beautiful property, and artistic talent. You are so lucky.

    My zip code is Cotopaxi. The property is 5 miles south of Texas Creek, hwy 69, and 5 miles east on CR 28 (gulch road). I bet you know the area well.

    In summer of 2003 I camped at Hayden Creek and Lake Creek campgrounds. As I drove out toward Hillside, I got out of the van and took a picture looking east and said outloud, "Wouldn't it be a dream to live around here." Well 6 months later, after I had bought the property, I was looking at photos and recognized Lookout Mountain. The property is less than a mile from Lookout Mtn.

    What altitude is your property? Do you garden? I bet you're close to the hot springs.

    Gary