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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just wanted to share this:



A Letter from a Shelter Manager


I think our society needs a huge "Wake-up" call. As a shelter manager, I am going to share a little insight with you all...a view from the inside if you will.

First off, all of you breeders/sellers should be made to work in the "back" of an animal shelter for just one day. Maybe if you saw the life drain from a few sad, lost, confused eyes, you would change your mind about breeding and selling to people you don't even know.

That puppy you just sold will most likely end up in my shelter when it's not a cute little puppy anymore. So how would you feel if you knew that there's about a 90% chance that dog will never walk out of the shelter it is going to be dumped at? Purebred or not! About 50% of all of the dogs that are "owner surrenders" or "strays", that come into my shelter are purebred dogs.

The most common excuses I hear are; "We are moving and we can't take our dog (or cat)." Really? Where are you moving too that doesn't allow pets? Or they say "The dog got bigger than we thought it would". How big did you think a German Shepherd would get? "We don't have time for her". Really? I work a 10-12 hour day and still have time for my 6 dogs! "She's tearing up our yard". How about making her a part of your family? They always tell me "We just don't want to have to stress about finding a place for her we know she'll get adopted, she's a good dog".

Odds are your pet won't get adopted & how stressful do you think being in a shelter is? Well, let me tell you, your pet has 72 hours to find a new family from the moment you drop it off. Sometimes a little longer if the shelter isn't full and your dog manages to stay completely healthy. If it sniffles, it dies. Your pet will be confined to a small run/kennel in a room with about 25 other barking or crying animals. It will have to relieve itself where it eats and sleeps. It will be depressed and it will cry constantly for the family that abandoned it. If your pet is lucky, I will have enough volunteers in that day to take him/her for a walk. If I don't, your pet won't get any attention besides having a bowl of food slid under the kennel door and the waste sprayed out of its pen with a high-powered hose. If your dog is big, black or any of the "Bully" breeds (pit bull, rottie, mastiff, etc) it was pretty much dead when you walked it through the front door.

Those dogs just don't get adopted. It doesn't matter how 'sweet' or 'well behaved' they are.

If your dog doesn't get adopted within its 72 hours and the shelter is full, it will be destroyed. If the shelter isn't full and your dog is good enough, and of a desirable enough breed it may get a stay of execution, but not for long . Most dogs get very kennel protective after about a week and are destroyed for showing aggression. Even the sweetest dogs will turn in this environment. If your pet makes it over all of those hurdles chances are it will get kennel cough or an upper respiratory infection and will be destroyed because shelters just don't have the funds to pay for even a $100 treatment.

Here's a little euthanasia 101 for those of you that have never witnessed a perfectly healthy, scared animal being "put-down".

First, your pet will be taken from its kennel on a leash. They always look like they think they are going for a walk happy, wagging their tails. Until they get to "The Room", every one of them freaks out and puts on the brakes when we get to the door. It must smell like death or they can feel the sad souls that are left in there, it's strange, but it happens with every one of them. Your dog or cat will be restrained, held down by 1 or 2 vet techs depending on the size and how freaked out they are. Then a euthanasia tech or a vet will start the process. They will find a vein in the front leg and inject a lethal dose of the "pink stuff". Hopefully your pet doesn't panic from being restrained and jerk. I've seen the needles tear out of a leg and been covered with the resulting blood and been deafened by the yelps and screams. They all don't just "go to sleep", sometimes they spasm for a while, gasp for air and defecate on themselves.

When it all ends, your pets corpse will be stacked like firewood in a large freezer in the back with all of the other animals that were killed waiting to be picked up like garbage. What happens next? Cremated? Taken to the dump? Rendered into pet food? You'll never know and it probably won't even cross your mind. It was just an animal and you can always buy another one, right?

I hope that those of you that have read this are bawling your eyes out and can't get the pictures out of your head I deal with everyday on the way home from work.

I hate my job, I hate that it exists & I hate that it will always be there unless you people make some changes and realize that the lives you are affecting go much farther than the pets you dump at a shelter.

Between 9 and 11 MILLION animals die every year in shelters and only you can stop it. I do my best to save every life I can but rescues are always full, and there are more animals coming in everyday than there are homes.

My point to all of this DON'T BREED OR BUY WHILE SHELTER PETS DIE!

Hate me if you want to. The truth hurts and reality is what it is. I just hope I maybe changed one persons mind about breeding their dog, taking their loving pet to a shelter, or buying a dog. I hope that someone will walk into my shelter and say "I saw this and it made me want to adopt". THAT WOULD MAKE IT WORTH IT


Best dog i ever owned is sitting right here beside me. Ellie my english mastiff. Such a wonderful friend and companion. She is a purebred and was/is in perfect health. Ill never buy from a breeder. I used to breed dogs a diffrent times of my life. No more, not for me. I have seen first hand the horrors of a puppy mill. The sad horrid conditions. The unloving way they are handled. :(
Please if you are considering a new best friend or too add to your family please consider your local shelter.

Keep your powder dry
 

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I adopted from a shelter once. It was a terrible experience. I filled out a 5 page application. I took my other dog up to meet the new dog to be sure they were compatible. I paid the fee for shots, worming and spaying. The day I came to get the dog a shelter worker decided that my home was not suitable because I had other dogs and this dog was malnourished.

Eventually after a couple of shelter workers argued for about 30 minutes I got to take the dog home. I took her to our vet 4 days later for an initial check. She had distemper. I had to pay to treat her for that. I had to pay to treat my other dogs that had developed pnuemonia ( a secondary infection). I had to change all my plans and keep that dog inside for 30 days so she didn't infect any other dog - the only way to keep my vet from putting her down.

My shelter dog ended up costing more than any purebred I have ever owned. So, the next time I found someone that had a litter of pups to give away. I'm done w/ the shelter. They made it such a horrid experience I will not return.

A view from the other side of the coin.
 

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i agree with countryshine--

i am a great dog owner. dogs who hate others, love me on first sight. but a shelter puts a person thru so much crap, that a litter of free pups is a better option. plus, the cost of a shelter dog is not cheap! but really, i adopt dogs that someone has locally and can't find a home for. i like getting young adults that others have given up on, as i know i can get the dog on the right track. the last one i got was a pup dumped in a ditch during a blizzard. he's no genius but did get my daughter a purple at the local 4H show.

a friend tried to get a shelter dog and the shelter wasn't open yet for 15 mins. my friend was hours from home and asked to please just look--no way. why would she want to deal with those ppl?

its a very sad situation, i really had to argue with DH to spay our female, but happy that i got it done. i dont' think its so much the purebred breeders but those who have mutts (like my ditch dog!) and dont' bother to fix them. its really a bad situation with little end in sight, sadly.
 

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Don't whine to me if you feel bad for running a death camp for fido. You don't like the job then quit. Close the shelter. Let the person with the dog be responsible for putting it down rather than running a shelter and giving them an easy out. I'm spelling it out for you since anyone fool enough to assume a dog has a soul has no clue about life. Save your hand wringing for soap and running water at the sink. I charge everyone else that if you want to be a pet owner then take the responsiblity to care for it. Shelters are another example of Americans wanting the good without the grief, the easy way out. I got no use for peta pukes and their myoptic view of life. Grown folks treat their animals proper, but we don't confuse them with, nor hold them to be the equal of human beings. Take that long walk over the hill and into the holler a time or two and you'll know if you're cut out to be a pet owner. If you aren't willing to take care of that pup from piddlin on paper till that last walk then you're letting somebody else do your dirty work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
At shelters around here the fee is small $35-$75 Usually on the downside for adult dogs. I personnaly dont like puppies. Im looking to adopt anothe mastiff. Ellie is my ESA dog. Emotional Support Animal. She has the certific that allows her to go where i go. Much like a seeing eye dog. Dogs cost alot more than just the intial fee.

Keep your powder dry
 

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My shelter here, underwritten by the county government and given police status is a proud contributor of PETA, HSUS, and is vehomently anti-hunting and anti-farming.

To obtain a pet from these people you need to pay many hundreds of dollars, submit a written application, suffer through a criminal background check and a physical inspection of your home. All members of the household must then be interviewed to determine suitability of them all for pet "companionship". If you fail, you are simply out the money you have given them.

If you are unfortunate enough to obtain a pet from them, they have you sign written authorization for them to come inspect your domocile at any time during the life of the companion animal, and to take said companion animal at any time they deem it to be in the best interest of the animal.

Thanks, but no thanks. I'll have nothing to do with that shelter, even if I'm forced to give them money from my taxes.
 

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Maybe if the people who volunteer or work in the shelter were a little more compassionate for the humans that visit some of these shelters, there wouldn't be such an overpopulation.

Two of the local shelters I've been to have the rudest people working there. I refuse to set foot in one just to get treated like crap.

(I know, not ALL shelters are like this but from what I've seen and heard, this is a big problem in a lot of them).
 

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Why do you want to share that ? I took a dog that was abandon to the shelter and was questioned as if I was at fault.
 

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I totally understand the thread originator's thoughts & think that everyone who is thinking about buying a dog / cat should at least give a shelter a try....if they can stand it.

I can also understand, and attest to, the almost-insane hoops & paperwork & interrogation that they make you go through in order to adopt. Want you to give SS#'s, phone / addresses of you AND relatives, the "right" to visit your home when they feel like it, etc.

We've lived in two different states & have been to serveral humane / adoption agencies throughout the years and have had almost the same treatment with each. Our dogs / cats have been adopted from these places, but each time we think about adopting again, I dread the whole "process".

I think that the shelters "think" they have the animals' best interests in mind when having the potential adoptive parents "screened", but I'm sure that they have soured many in the process and therefore lost the chance to adopt an animal....probably many, many others also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
At shelters around here all you do is walk in the kennel and pick which dog you want. Give a name and address for the dog tag. Nothing else. I agree that alot of places especially the humane society are a joke and try to extract huge fees. I dont go to these places. I go to my county dog pound, and counties surrounding mine. At the county pound you could give a false name and addy if you want they dont check id's or any such thing. I guess its diffrent wherever you are. My point is only consider a shelter animal instead of buying from a puppy mill. Have you ever been to a puppy mill. I have lots of them, and most i must say are disgusting.

Keep your powder dry
 

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At shelters around here all you do is walk in the kennel and pick which dog you want. Give a name and address for the dog tag. Nothing else. I agree that alot of places especially the humane society are a joke and try to extract huge fees. I dont go to these places. I go to my county dog pound, and counties surrounding mine. At the county pound you could give a false name and addy if you want they dont check id's or any such thing. I guess its diffrent wherever you are. My point is only consider a shelter animal instead of buying from a puppy mill. Have you ever been to a puppy mill. I have lots of them, and most i must say are disgusting.

Keep your powder dry
The place you are talking about sounds similar to the Animal Controls throughout the country that have very high kill rates. Trust me, I've picked up a carload of puppies from one of them to find homes for so that they wouldn't get put to sleep, and they really do just want the animals to have a home. And I'm not about to show up at anyone's door for "visitation rights" or anything else silly.

It is too bad that so many shelters have turned people off of adopting animals. Our family would not qualify for a shelter animal because we have a toddler, but high kill animal controls are thrilled to have me pull dogs to place in homes. Honestly, it's alright with me that our family wouldn't meet the requirements to adopt from a shelter. The rescue worker doesn't know me, or my family, and their rear is on the line if anything happens to the dog or my daughter. I have also seen shelters refuse people who truly should never own an animal. It goes both ways.

Anyways, for you anti-shelter people, if you're looking for a dog or cat try craigslist. Lots of free or cheap animals that people got at one point and now can't keep because they are moving or had kids or didn't know how much time an animal required or didn't think the pet would get so big or didn't ask their parents or spouse before bringing it home.

Kayleigh
 

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May I ask how you have come to see so many puppy mills? Reason I ask is that alot of people have no knowledge of the existence of such places.
 

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I would bet that the county where that letter originated has more space available for stray dogs than for homeless people. Perhaps we have our priorities a bit mixed up.:cool:
 

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We were gonna adopt from a shelter. . .until we saw the "application". Other animals, fenced yard, on-site inspection (meaning they come *to my house* to see if it is fit for animals). Uhh. . .yes, no, not-on-your-cotton-picking-life.

And try finding a papered GSD in a shelter. . .heck, a papered *anything*.
 

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I would bet that the county where that letter originated has more space available for stray dogs than for homeless people. Perhaps we have our priorities a bit mixed up
I agree. I've been in nursing homes and have seen animals in shelters treated better than we (collectively) treat our elderly.
 

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I adopted my terrier from a no-kill shelter: he had been there about a month. And, they had a vet on duty.

He was healthy and friendly, and he cost $115. We had to all come in and meet him, but there was no home inspection: I would not have tolerated that!

Yes, the application asked where the dog would be living, but, I THINK that was just so they could say something if you wanted to put a great dane in a 1 bedroom apartment? I am guessing, here.

All of your horror stories make me think that there must be an awfull lot of really badly-run places!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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2 of our 5 pets came from humane shelters the other 3 just showed up on our doorstep.
I agree, the hoops shelters make you go through are really stupid, the last one made us wait a week before picking up a kitten, but I still would get a pet from there over buying one.
 

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There is a big difference between most city-run animal controls or shelters and the private rescues here. The "rescues" are usually expensive and the city/suburban ones are trying so hard to place animals that some will give them away....that's how I got my $1,000 wonder dog Ruby! But they were honest and told me she had heartworms...then they gave her to us.
All of our pets are rescues, in one way or another, but I would not jump thru hoops like some places want.

Windy in Kansas- i was thinking the same thing when I opened this!
 
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