a few goat questions?????????

Discussion in 'Goats' started by farminghandyman, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    how many years do most get out of a doe, milking?

    what is the expected good number of years of producion?

    what do you consider good milk production out of a yearling doe, first freshing?


    what do you consider good milk producion out of a mature doe?

    Thankyou, for you input,
     
  2. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    I'm not certain about the number of years (I think maybe 8? But I'm fairly new to this still). But I was getting 3/4 of a gallon out of a first freshening Saanen (very cooperative) and the same from a mature, but previously un-milked, Nubian (annoyingly argumentative). As for the mature doe's production it depends on so many different factors that it would be hard to tell. Every breed produces a different average and every doe is different in it's own breed category. Saanens and Alpines and LaManchas and Nubians and Toggs...they all have averages above a gallon a day...Nubians have lower volume but higher butterfat, Saanens have higher volume but lower butterfat...those are the two breeds that I have and am going into the second year of milking next month.

    What breed of milk goat are you interested in the most? Maybe the experts on that breed can help a bit more? I'm also sure that diet and health care management play a big role in how long a doe lives and is in full production, too.

    Sarah
     

  3. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    ok you may find this odd, but I have had GOats since 1999,

    and yes we have had 3 years of drought and not the best feed,
    and lots of wind hard on the animals, in my opinion.

    but I have one old doe that is really showing her age and has really dropped in milk production, and was born in spring of 98, and I don't think she will do another year, and have not had the experience to know what is a good run on one,

    I have lamancha and nubian and most of the off spring are crosses,

    my best milker is lamancha and pumps out a gallon a day easily, but here kidding has been mostly males, I finally got one doe out of her last year and she kidded and raised two nice bucks up to weaning age, and I started to milk her and i don't think I am getting a quart out of her a day, and thinking back I thought I at lest got 1/2 gallon a day out of the others I have raised, now granted I took the kids off of her and this was the first week on the milk stand, (she has settled down and not minding much), but momma is a good milker and I am currently disappointed with her daughter, and was so hoping to be able to build off of her and her momma, she is such a good looking and strong animal,

    I have had good luck with the Nubian's milking I have had and most have been good milkers, but not as good as the lamancha, but the udder attachment on the Nubian's is so poor on my batch,
    and the old ones the udder hangs so low and the does are so nervous on getting up on the milk stand as not to step on there teats, so I was hoping to rebuild my heard on the lamancha but so far i have been disappointed, my Nubian's are horrible mothers and the lamancha ones are great mommas,

    that lamancha doe had a weak kid and had a hard time get up the first few days she would stand over it and lower her self to let the kid suck, never had to worry about kidding or the baby's not getting licked off, the Nubian's would let the kids lay in the after birth after having them and drowned in it if your not right there when kidding,

    and so I thought I would ask to see what other thought, thank-you.
     
  4. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    with good management a goat can easy live up to 15 years and be productive. an 8 years old goat is at the high of her live. to keep animals out of harsh wind shouldn't be this difficult with a three sited shelter. with milk production you get out what you put in. a lamancha goat is one of the best milker so i heard. she can give easy 1 1/2 gallon per day. maybe you need to rethink your goat management? internet is a very good source to learn.

    susanne
     
  5. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    how many years do most get out of a doe, milking? Most of our bloodline lives, kids and milks healthily till 12. Really from that point forward they have problems getting bred, problems with their stamina, problems loosing thier place as herd boss with younger does challenging them. Once they get this age, I choose to put them down, I don't have facilities for an old folks pen. I think it is much better for a quality of life. I have had one doe to 14, she had to be helped up each morning, it wasn't much of a life for her, after she was put down, I made up my mind, and haven't faultered from my mind.

    what is the expected good number of years of producion? 12

    what do you consider good milk production out of a yearling doe, first freshing? At least 6 pounds, sure you may have a flush of 8 pounds, my first fresheners are real yearlings, kidding on their first birthday, but a good 5 or 6 pounds for 10 months after the first flush of milk is ideal.


    what do you consider good milk producion out of a mature doe? 8 and 9 pounds consistantly. We have a doe who will peak at 16, but even she will go down to a good 9 pounds consistantly for the 10 months. I would expect a doe at maturity to milk this well (5) and continue at least until 9 at this range, milking less as a young milker and milking less as an aged doe.

    The biggest thing for me is that it is better to have a handful of quality does milking out of good attachments, on excellent care, than a barnful of mediocre milkers, with poor attachments that get scratched up in our woods/underbrush, on less food because of expense in a large herd...and who you also can't get as much for their kids or bucklings. Vicki
     
  6. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    the "Old" Nubian I am talking about I was told when I bought her she was born in 98 but that my not have been true, she could be older, (she is grayed and looks tire and old, when getting up on on the milk stand she literal craws, up, I have put steps in front of it for her or had as I let her dry up, as she was not doing well), the people I got her from did a lot of line breding and I had three of there does at first and have not been impressed with the stamina and the long term quality of that herd, so that is why I was or would like to build on my very good Lamancha goat, but like I was discussing her off spring has not been as impressing as hope for, (below)

    now my little yearling (Lamancha Nubian cross), may just be down to to stress, as the kids were sold, and she has had a little difficulty getting familiar to the milking, (calming down now) and the wind has been miserable ever since the kids were removed, most of the last week, winds have been 40 to 60 mph most of the day light hours, and even tho they have shelter, they are not out eating and doing there thing, a lot of stress, for them,
    I am hoping now that she is getting use to the changes of the last few weeks she will improve, and that could be the reason for the lower than expected milk producing.

    Thankyou all for you input,
     
  7. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Do you supply feed for the goats inside their shelter? Hay at least should be available to them 24/7, even if they get most of their feed from grazing/browse most of the time. When the weather is bad, they won't go out to feed, and must have food available indoors at that time.

    Kathleen
     
  8. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure this has been answered elswhere, but, would someone describe what a good attachment looks like, what a poor attachment looks like?
     
  9. billooo2

    billooo2 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    re: udder attachment....

    The best way to learn is to go to a goat breeder who has been showing, and, ideally, on DHIA for milk records.

    Have them show you a good udder vs. a not so good udder.....and feel the texture, and have them show you how to evaluate the area of attachment, and what a "pocket" is.....and how a good fore-udder should blend into the body of the goat.

    The extremely bad udder, when viewed from the back is pear-shaped, long and pendulous, huge teats, almost dragging the ground.

    If you check the websites of some of the goat herds, they usually have pictures of the udders on their goats. This will give an idea for starters.
     
  10. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    I expect 8 years out of my does, at least. and I expect at least a gal a day out of my does, My second year fresheners, are giving me a gal and a half right now a day .I think If I had a doe that gave only cups a day, I would cull her, and nothing excepted nder a half gal a day, isn't worth my time. but then again, you get what you pay for.