9.2% Nitrofurazone question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by animal_kingdom, Apr 19, 2005.

  1. animal_kingdom

    animal_kingdom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    567
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Location:
    PA
    I have a friend that just treated her herd with this medication because of a cocidia problem.

    First I would like to know if there is any information out there about slaughter withdrawl.
    Second I would like to know if there is any other way to treat the ground besides plowing it under.

    Her vet told her that the only way to rid the soil of coccidia is to plow the ground under. Also that coccidia is always present, but what causes outbreak is the conditions in which it incubates depends on weather and care. Apparently it takes a hard freeze to kill this stuff and we've had a basically mild winter this year.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
     
  2. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,061
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2003
    check the label for slaughter withhold on that.
    But the vet., told it true. cocci, is everywhere, and in the east, mild winter, very wet, summers, humid, is a cocci breeding ground. I just try to keep very clean houses, and keep a light dusting of straw down. not much else you can do. it is a mean thing, and kills fast. that is about all you can do. keep all water and grain dishes clean. that is about it. good luck.
     

  3. rhjacobi

    rhjacobi Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Hi animal kingdom,

    Debitaber must be down my way where we breed parasites in great abundance with the wet and hot climate. It is everywhere and I don't even think plowing your pastures under would do anything but possibly reduce it for a little while. You can't plow the barn under either. If you could completely rid the barn of Coccidia, you would probably kill the goats too.

    The Hoeggergoatsupply web page has some good information and preventative programs outlined. I think that we originally got our program from them, but haven't found that we have to do quite as much as they suggest in some of the articles.

    We try to prevent a clinical out break of Coccidiosis while they build their immunity to it. Beginning at about 3 or 4 weeks of age, we give them a drench of 12.5% Sulfadimethoxine (Di-Methox or Albon) at the dosage of 2cc per day for the first week and then 1cc per day for the second week. We also encourage them to get into eating the grain that we feed the kids which contains a coccidistat. Between the intial drenching and when they are eating enough grain to prevent a clinical outbreak, we also observe and do fecal sample tests to check. If necessary, we will do the five day treatment to keep it from becoming a problem until the coccidiostat and the immunity can begin working. We are usually feeding them this grower feed with a coccidiostat until they are about a year old. After that, there has never been a problem for us. I suspect that the danger is probably over long before they are a year old, but our procedures don't really let us learn that. I can say that we have not had a problem with Coccidiosis for years due to this program. Other areas and situations may require more or less prevention, but it is 100% preventable.

    Bob
    Lynchburg, TN.
     
  4. animal_kingdom

    animal_kingdom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    567
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Location:
    PA
    Thanks for the information on treating the animals while they're young.
    It hits mostly when they are young. They can't handle such large amounts of coccidia.

    My friend had told me that she notices that when she puts her babies out to pasture for the first time, that they all seem to loose some weight even though they are eating and no one has runny bottoms.

    Then I took a look at mine and realized that even though they aren't on good pasture ground yet, they too have slimmed down. Nothing that I was concerned about. Just thought that they had more exercise so it was"refining" their naturally good looks...lol

    Problem is this...we both have meat goats so selling them young is most popular. Most of them go to the butcher after purchase. Then we have the problem with slaughter withdrawl.

    If we start them and finish them with the albon or di-methox then do you know off hand what slaughter withdrawl is for that particular medication?

    I have a bag of Corid here. I could easily put that is the adult drinking water. Would it pass to the babies through the milk? Maybe I couldn't count on that being very effective.

    Once I had a problem with Coccidia. I bought goats from a woman down the road. Never will I again. The babies were infested with coccidia. Passed onto the dogs and even my other goats. I kept them separate for a couple of weeks. Should have treated them for all sorts of stuff even though I saw no signs. I had such a huge problem. The girls and I had to bury a few of the babies. I learned my lesson.

    Until my friend had this problem with a baby that just went down within 24 hours and was fine prior to that, I hadn't ever thought about coccidia maintanence. Never knew it was here to stay!

    Thanks for helping on this one. I'll pass all information to my friend this week. We are learning together. We each end up with quite a different array of situations that it has helped us both to reconsider our ways of doing things.
     
  5. rhjacobi

    rhjacobi Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Hi animal kingdom,

    I can say that I have never had a case of Coccidiosis in a goat over a year old. Actually, probably not even after about three months, but that may be because of the medicated feed. Somewhere in that period of time they develop an immunity and it should no longer be a worry.

    I used the last bottle of Sulfadimethoxine so I don't have the label to read for withdrawl time. There is a web site that lists withdrawl times for just about any kind of medicine. Unfortunately a computer crash also took everything that I save in favorites. It is probably somewhere in the USDA web site, but I know that it is posted out there by the government who requires theses withdrawl times. Generally after about three months (weaning time for us), we would not have a reason to use Sulfadimethoxine and we wouldn't be selling until they are at least about 6 months so it hasn't been an issue for us with this medication.

    We feed a medicated grower feed to the kids and by weaning they are eating enough to get ample supply of the medication. The coccidiostat in the feed is called Decoquinate. There is no withdrawl time for this for meat. There is a warning not to feed to does that are producing milk for food.

    We use Corid for the calves and it works great, but have not found it effective for goats. I see that the jackmauldin web site suggests Corid, but in conjunction with another medication. I have never tried this approach, but probably prefer to stick to one medicine over a short duration. We have not pushed it that far, but I understand that an effective dose of Corid would be enough to create a Thiamine deficiency (goat polio). Goat polio isn't pretty and takes a lot of TLC during recovery so I avoid it. The kids may sometimes get some if we have calves on pasture with them and we add some Corid to the water for the calves. Again, it isn't anywhere the dosage needed to cause a problem or to be effective for goats.

    Coccidiosis can be a nasty and costly problem. However, now that we have put a program in place that works in our area and situation, we haven't had a problem with it in years.

    I hope that this helps some.

    Bob
    Lynchburg, TN.


     
  6. animal_kingdom

    animal_kingdom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    567
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Location:
    PA
    Thanks Bob!
    You are always a tremendous help. I read alot of your posts and they are very educational and I sometimes print them out for reference later.

    I had a polio baby once. Was very sad. He died. I think we treated him too late and should have been more aggressive with everything. It was just pitiful to watch him.

    I now know what to look for and hope to never have another.

    I never had a major outbreak of coccidia. Only once from the woman we bought the goats from that I mentioned before. Since then, we have no problems with any of our animals. But the information you gave me will get me going with a treatment plan.

    Thanks a ton! :D
     
  7. okiemom

    okiemom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,292
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    N.E. OK
    I lost my first kid crop to Cocci. There were no signs except for pneumonia. After a lot of $$$$ I found out from the vet the pneumonia was a secondary infection from the cocci it killed fast. w/in 24 hrs the kid went from healthy to dead. I had to treat the babies w/ a coccistate and the adults to get the levels of cocci down. Sweetlix w/ rumensin helped. I have not lost another baby to pneumonia sense. We now leave a block out with all the heavy bred does so they will have reduced numbers of cocci and them so will the kids.

    Cocci is not to be underestimated. It kills. It may not show itself in the classic case of bloody stools etc. It can be hard to detect w/o a fecal. It pays BIG to fecal test kids.
     
  8. rhjacobi

    rhjacobi Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Hi animal_kingdom,

    I am glad that I can be of some help. I still remember my learning curve with goats when I went from an old cattle rancher to goats. I'm hoping some folks can pick up a few things learning from my mistakes rather than having to make all the same mistakes that I have made over the years.

    Bob
    Lynchburg, TN.

     
  9. rhjacobi

    rhjacobi Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Amen okiemom.

    Bob
    Lynchburg, TN.