'66 Chev pickup won't start

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by DJ in WA, Apr 21, 2006.

  1. DJ in WA

    DJ in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Okay, I finally need to get the old ’66 Chevy running (283 V8 with 2 barrel carb). I only drive it about 6 or 8 times a year to haul hay or something. I parked it last October, then forgot to put fuel stabilizer in it til December. Tried to start it then, but it wouldn’t go. Turned over strong, and fired when I poured alittle gas in the carb, but wouldn’t keep going.

    I added some gas to the tank, just in case the fuel gauge is wrong. Still won’t go. I see gas in the fuel filter near the carburetor.

    I’m no serious mechanic, so don’t know how involved I want to get, but since this pickup seems relatively simple under the hood, thought maybe I could try a few things. Where would you start? I assume it’s not getting fuel. Could carburetor gum up from sitting too long? Can fuel pump die while parked? Thanks for any ideas.
     
  2. mohillbilly

    mohillbilly Well-Known Member

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    Pull the fuel line off of the carb, then have someone crank the engine over and see if fuel is pumping from the pump. If not, then probably a bad fuel pump.

    If it is pumping fuel, then i would pull the carb and give it a GOOD cleaning, and be sure the needles and seats are cleaned very well and the float is not stuck.

    If it runs on gas poured down the carb, then it is most definatly a fuel delivery probelm.

    One more thing, put a ford or dodge emblem on the truck and it will start for sure!!!!!!!!!!!LOL!!!!!!! :) :p
     

  3. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    Before You Pull Everything Apart Pull A Plug Wire And See If You Are Getting Spark.
     
  4. DJ in WA

    DJ in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Okay, I didn't get any fuel out of the line (disconnected between fuel pump and filter) while someone cranked for about 10 seconds.

    So, since I know there is fuel in the tank (just added), does this mean it has to be the fuel pump? If so, I'm curious how it goes bad - it was running fine when I parked it.

    This is somewhat nostalgic, as in about 1975 at age 16, I replaced a similar one on my Dad's '68 Chev.
     
  5. mohillbilly

    mohillbilly Well-Known Member

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    Unless there is a restriction/blockage/loose line/broken line between the fuel tank and fuel pump, you have a bad fuel pump. Cheap to replace, and easy to replace. They can go bad due to the diaphram in them rotting or breaking.

    Go to the local auto store and pick one up and bolt it on.
     
  6. DJ in WA

    DJ in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Okay, I guess I'll resurrect this thread. I'm finally getting around to getting the old Chev going.

    I got a new mechanical fuel pump, and went to "bolt it on" and I can't get the bolts lined up. Seems the lever that sticks out of it hits a rod in the engine hole that I assume makes the pumping action. This keeps me from being able to line up the bolts (it rides high). Is there some trick you mechanics use? I've tried every angle and tried doing one side at a time, but no luck. The NAPA guy and I have lined up and measured the old and new pump and they look the same.

    THanks for any tips. Seems the simple fixes for me don't turn out simple.
     
  7. Highground

    Highground Well-Known Member

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    Spin the engine over a tad. That "lever" rides on a cam.
     
  8. DJ in WA

    DJ in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Okay, that idea had occurred to me - I gave it alittle crank for half second and tried again, but no luck. Had daughter turn engine over and I watched the rod in the engine, but it didn't appear to move. But I guess a cam is the only way to move the lever up and down. Maybe I need to crank a few more times and get the cam in the right spot. Thanks
     
  9. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    I Know on other small block chevies there is a rod that is inbetween the pump and the cam. Stick your finger in the hole and see if it has slipped down. If it has this rod there is also a bolt in the front of the block that looks like it's doing nothing. Remove that bolt and find one with longer threads. That hole bottoms out against that rod. Hold the rod up with one finder while you screw the longer bolt in tell it bottoms out to hold the rod up. You should be able to install the pump them. Be sure and replace the bolt before cranking the engine over.
     
  10. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    You have to push the rod to make it retract when the cam is in the correct position. The rod will not retract on its own. The arm on the fuel pump has the return spring on it. When you get the rod to where you can push it out of the way cram some clean chassis grease on it to hold it in place.
     
  11. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    Use a hacksaw blade to hold the fuel pump rod up while you put the pump in, until you can get the pump lever under the rod. You can get hold of the rod with needle nose pliers to slide it up and get the blade under it. :cowboy:
     
  12. WolfWalksSoftly

    WolfWalksSoftly Level II -Inappropriate

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    A small amount of heavy grease will hold it up too, so you can install the pump.
     
  13. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Two other approaches are available, one is to install a pair of studs rather than bolts - when you tighten the accompanying nuts they will pull the new pump into its position without fighting the spring loaded pump arm. Secondly, an electrical fuel pump can be installed anywhere it will mount adequately and a cover plate also installed over the original pumps access hole.
     
  14. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Just a caution. If you do not get the rod retracted and you attempt to mount the fuel pump an let the pump "force" the rod into position you can bend the rod.
     
  15. DJ in WA

    DJ in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the ideas. I think I now understand how things should work. The rod is down to the bottom of the hole, and I couldn't see how it would make the lever go up and down. I need to get it up and get the lever under it, then the cam up in the engine will push the rod up and down and then the lever.

    Might be a few days before I get to it. Wife thinks I should be getting ready for big gathering for daughters graduation, like cleaning cow pies off lawn, etc.
     
  16. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    Another option would be to scrap the mechanical pump,and pick up an electric pump(they are cheap).Run new hotwire to it,and get back on the road.Some of the older vehicles will run more smoothly with an electric pump,anyway.You'll need to use a block-off plate on the old mechanical plate to keep crud from making its way into the hole.
     
  17. DJ in WA

    DJ in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm back.

    The hacksaw blade did the trick and I got it running.

    I suppose an electric pump might be better, but the rig needs alot of work, and I'm not sure if I want to keep it. Rebuilt motor 30,000 ago, but otherwise worn out (wiring, suspension, body). Maybe someone might want for parts.

    To help me decide, let me bring up another problem. Again, the pickup has sat since October. So, I get it running the other day, go to move it, and discover the clutch won't disengage - it kept moving when I pushed in the clutch - had to jerk it out of gear to stop. Any ideas on how that would happen from sitting around?
     
  18. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Yes, the clutch disc is rusted to the flywheel. Put the truck against preferrably a big tree or tie the trailer hitch(if it has one) to an immoveable object. Hold the clutch pedal in and attempt to push or pull with the engine running and in 1st gear and the disc should free itself from the flywheel. Do not do this if the truck has a hydraulic type clutch actuator. I do not think it does! Regardless, with the engine not running and prior to the above, push the clutch in and determine that the linkage to the release bearing arm is functioning.