641 Ford tractor

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by tambo, Dec 7, 2003.

  1. tambo

    tambo Well-Known Member

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    Do any of you have one of these tractors or know anything about them?What HP is it?

    Tambo
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    PTO horsepower is 32
    The gas version is supposedly a good tractor. The diesel were hard to start in cold weather.
     

  3. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Manufactured 1959-61. Advertised prices range from $1,602 - $1,772. Average auction prices are low of $442, high of $1,662 and the average of $1,119.

    Gas: Ford 4-cyl, 134 CID, 34-37 PTO depending on model, 4/1 speed, 2,760 to 2,828 pounds. Original list price $2,555 to $2,665.

    Diesel: Ford 4-cyl, 141-143 CID, 32-3 PTO dependong on model, 4/1 speed, 2,936 to 3,014 pounds. Original lis price $2,990 to $3,095.

    Source: Hot Line Farm Equipment Guide: Quick Refernece Guide

    Ken S. in WC TN
     
  4. tambo

    tambo Well-Known Member

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    What is the difference between a live pto and a not live pto?

    Tambo
     
  5. Live power is when the power takeoff keeps turning when the clutch pedal is depressed. That is a good thing especially while mowing. If it is not live power the mower will keep pushing the tractor during mowing operations until the force of the blades slow down
     
  6. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    Good point. like through a fence....
     
  7. tooltime

    tooltime Border Ruffian

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    These old Ford tractors are excellent tractors, but you have to look at the actual tractor in question to see how it has been treated and maintained.

    The 641 Ford is a 601 series, 641 model. The 6 denotes that the tractor is a 4-wheel adjustable axle with the 134 CID Red-Tiger engine. The 4 denotes that the tractor has a four-speed transmission, and the 1 denotes the 601 series/Workmaster. The Workmaster/601 series was manufactured from 1957-1962, and the principal difference in the 601 series from the 600 series or from the earlier NAA/Jubilee series is that the engine has a higher compression ratio (7.5:1 vs. 6.6:1). Tractor had 33.6 HP on the PTO and 29 HP on the drawbar. Weight from the factory for the 641 was 2737 lbs., although the actual tractor you look at may weigh considerably more if it has fluid in the rear tires, weights, etc.

    The tractor's paint scheme (if correct) should be Ford red on all parts except the grill, fenders and wheels (Ford gray). The lettering should be in white and say Ford 641 Workmaster on the sheet metal above the engine. The way to distinguish the 601 series from the 600 series (other than the 601 series having the Ford red as predominant paint color) is the difference in hood emblem, if original. The 601 series has a hood emblem with a golden stalk of corn on a red/white background. Truth is that parts often got interchanged, and only way to tell for sure if tractor is really a 19xx 601 series is to check the serial number, which is located on the left side of the transmission housing, above and to rear of starter. The serial number is hand stamped onto a horizontal flat. Serial numbers ran from 1001-155,531. You can look up range of serial numbers by year.

    The 641 model did not have live PTO from the factory, only the 661 Workmaster had live PTO from factory. This tractor might have options such as power steering, power-adjust rear wheels, a Sherman auxiliary transmission and possibly dual hydraulics.

    I would avoid the LP and diesel versions, and avoid any Ford tractor with what is called a Select-0-Speed transmission.

    These tractors are extremely reliable, have excellent resale, and have three-point which means that they can use a variety of 3-pt. implements. They are a bit light for their HP, so fluid in the tires and/or wheel weights might be advisable. When these tractors were new, guys farmed 160-200 acres with these tractors. I've seen 641's sell typically from $3000-$4000, with restored tractors going for as high as $6000.

    I currently have a 1939 2N, a 1942 Ford 2N, a 1949 Ford 8N with FUnk V-8 and Sherman transmission, a 1950 8N with belly mower, a 1953 Ford Jubilee, a 1954 Jubilee with loader, a 1958 661 Workmaster, a 1958 861 Powermaster, a 1952 Ferguson TO-30 and a 1955 Fordson Major Diesel. These are great tractors, and the 641 is a good utility tractor. It is short and low to the ground, which makes it useful for mowing, pulling wagons, etc. Other than not having live PTO and being essentially a 30 HP tractor, the 641 is an excellent tractor. If it were in good or better shape, I'd pay at least $2500 for it.

    Whether the tractor is right for you depends on what HP tractor you are looking for; what options you want (power steering, 4WD, etc.). You'll get better value for your dollar purchasing a tractor like the 641 than one of the newer utility tractors, although some of those have 4WD. It also helps to have some knowledge of tractor maintenance and engine repair if there isn't a good Ford mechanic in your area.