52 Massey Ferguson Tractor

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by WolfWalksSoftly, May 24, 2006.

  1. WolfWalksSoftly

    WolfWalksSoftly Level II -Inappropriate

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    I need some help getting an old tractor started. It's been sitting for a year. I replaced plugs, points, gas, fuel filter. I pulled a plug and am not getting any spark at all..do I need to replace the coil ? Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    The condenser would be the next obvious thing for me to replace, check the coil with a test light to see if it is getting currant. A coil works by loading the outside wire wrappings, then overloads to the point that the electricity has to go somewhere, which makes it jump to the inward wrappings - this causes a current flow which causes a spark to travel out via the distributer, to the correct cylinder, the condenser is a short term storage battery for this action that can happen hundreds of times per minute, even at a slow idle. A defective condenser will not hold enough electrical storage for this to happen.
     

  3. WolfWalksSoftly

    WolfWalksSoftly Level II -Inappropriate

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    Thanks, I am hoping my MIL has a manual(she said she has one for it),I don't know what a condenser looks like. I am new to tractors and not much better with cars..lol. I've been told a Chevy coil will work on this tractor, if true, would make finding it easier.

    This tractor is in good shape otherwise and after seeing pictures of a restored MF, after I get it running I would like to paint it and bring it back to life.
     
  4. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Does your tractor still have 6volt system? If so you need a 6volt coil, can be off any make vehicle/tractor/stationary engine with a 6volt system. If its been converted to 12volt, then you need a 12volt coil off something with 12volt point type ignition (1974 and earlier on cars/trucks) though some early non-GM electronic ignitions on cars without computers used same coil also. Now these come in two varieties with and without built in ballast resistor. If whoever converted your tractor to 12v used coil without built in resistor, you should find one attached near coil on your tractor. Trace back wire from + side of your coil. Many were ceramic with terminal on each end. Now of course if guy who converted your tractor was lazy he may have just not included a ballast resistor. This will eat up your points faster than necessary but tractor will run ok. If it helps, coils with external ballast resistor were far more common than coils with builtin resistor.
     
  5. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Oh, condenser is small shiney cylindrical metal thing that has wire coming off one end. It may be mounted under distributor cap next to points or some were mounted externally, usually on side of distributor. Around inch long and half inch diameter.
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    With the key off, and the distributor cap off, crank the engine to where the points are closed. Now with the key on use an insulated handle screwdriver open the points and determine if you have a small spark. If not, the power is not being delivered from the battery and this needs to be corrected. If you have spark move on to what the others have suggested.
     
  7. WolfWalksSoftly

    WolfWalksSoftly Level II -Inappropriate

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    It's been converted to a 12 volt system, and it does have the outside condenser..I remember seeing it after having it described..thanks for all the info, I appreciate it.
     
  8. WolfWalksSoftly

    WolfWalksSoftly Level II -Inappropriate

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    Just an update.... With the help from this forum, I got the tractor up and running. I also discovered the radiator had a leak, but Bars Leak fixed that.
    Thanks again everyone.
     
  9. spam4einstein

    spam4einstein Well-Known Member

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    Drain that cooling system and radiator. That stuff used to be my favorite fix. I still like it, but learned my lesson about leaving it in the system after its done its job.
     
  10. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    A man who has suffered from plugged heater cores, thermostats, and water pumps... LOL.


    Good advice.
     
  11. spam4einstein

    spam4einstein Well-Known Member

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    It has damaged almost all of the above and a radiator too. Only the thermostat was spared, but it was replaced first, so it may as well have been bad too. I get the he-be geebes just thinking about it.
     
  12. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    The "bars leak" that has the little black tar like pellets wont plug anything else up. Wont maybe solve your leak problem a real long time, just as a stopgap measure. Those powdered aluminum stop leak products will plug up your heater core for sure.

    The best way however is to drain, flush, add just water and use sodium silicate (also called egg glass or liquid glass). You can run it indefinitely in radiator that contains only water , though usually half hour at operating temp will seal any small leaks. Then drain and flush again and put antifreeze mix back in. The sodium silicate patch will hold indefinitely. Do NOT mix liquid sodium silicate in radiator with antifreeze. It reacts and WILL PLUG YOUR SYSTEM. The small amount of sodium silicate that actually plugs hole becomes inert and wont react with antifreeze.

    easiest way to buy sodium silicate is at auto parts store, but cheapest place is somebody in pottery supply buisiness as its used as a mold release. A gallon there will go for same price as little bottle in autoparts store. You just need a small amount though. Dont put a gallon in your radiator. People used to suggest buying it at a pharmacy. I've never seen it in a modern pharmacy, but hey worth a try I guess, especially if you have an old independent pharmacy in your locality. The modern chains sure arent going to carry it I bet.