3 PT Dirt Scoop - Will it help??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by shelbynteg, Dec 22, 2004.

  1. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    I have recently purchased an older farm tractor, 42 hp, live pto. I decided not to get a front-end loader, because of the added price. We have several areas, though, where a loader would be useful. I'm wondering if a dirt scoop could be useful in these applications:

    We generate plenty of used bedding from our barn, and are creating multiple largish compost piles, that need turning every week or so. Can I use the scoop, or will it be as useful to use a box blade to flatten the pile, and then back up with the same blade to re-assemble the pile?

    Also, several of the stalls have 18"+ of packed down bedding, mostly consists of wasted hay and droppings. If you dig it out manually, it almost comes out in layers because of the hay. Will the scoop effectively do the digging through this hardpacked material? The stuff will then be moved out manually.

    As always, many thanks.
     
  2. george darby

    george darby Well-Known Member

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    [a scoop would help but is more difficult to operate since it is backwards and you are looking behind you, id go back and get a loader if you could afford it its so handyand if you are turning compost and handling tons of material you will be glad you got it
     

  3. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    you can get rear end loaders that work same as a front end loader.wifo parmiter to name two. rear buckets are good for shallow digging or spreading soil/compost same with box blade or blade . busting out packed pen? maybe pulling but pushing you can knock out a wall easy!
     
  4. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    Best to shop around for a used front end loader.
    I've got both ... and find the loader is a lot more useful.

    If you add a set of forks to the bucket - or make them interchangeable - you'll find LOTS of uses for your "light-duty forklift" when you combine them with free pallets (from your local source).
     
  5. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You won't be happy with it. It will work with some of your tasks, but it won't dump high enough to make a good compost pile.

    While there is still straw in the compost, neither a blade nor a bucket will do much but skid over the top of it.

    It will not work with the fresh manure & straw mix _at all_. You need something with forks/ teeth, a manure bucket, for that.

    Try moving the manure/straw pack with a pitch fork. Then try moving it with a scoop shovel. You will see the difference in a hurry!

    The dirt scoop will move the composted compost for you, be good for that much.

    Sounds like you really needed that loader. With both a dirt & manure bucket.

    --->Paul
     
  6. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Ditto what Paul said. Plus you get very little volume in them. You'd need to make a hundred trips to move a moderate sized-pile of anything. I know, I've got one. Its like moving a mountain one teaspoon at a time.
     
  7. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    I was afraid it would be basically useless...I guess there's a reason that loaders are $2000 and up, and buckets are $200. I'll have to wait a while and collect the next piece of cash before I get the loader...
     
  8. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't say they are basically useless. But I will say this: a rear scoop is about 3 or 4 times as fast as using a shovel and wheelbarrow, and a lot less back-breaking. But a front end loader is probably 3 or 4 times faster than a scoop of the same capacity. I've had both, and the scoop was definitely worth the $150 I paid for it at auction.
     
  9. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I agree with Steve I've got 2 loader tractors a skidsteer and a backhoe, but I've got one of those little scoops too and its darned handy! Mine is a MF and you can hook it to push or pull (plane off soil) BTW I've never paid 2k for a loader, if you were closer I'd sell you a patched up but very servicable Case industrial loader for $350 with front pump but no bucket. Add the bucket for another $250, but Texas is kinda far away. My Ford has a Ford industrial loader that cost us $900 to put on years ago. Now the QA plate and stonefork/grapple we added a few years ago are a whole other bill but hardly a basic set up!
     
  10. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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    The front end loader is a must. I have a rear loader 3 point hitch, 6 feet wide and 30 inches deep that will dump. It is a great tool called super pan,but will only go up 40 inches high.
     
  11. popscott

    popscott Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For the folks with the 3 point hitch experience…

    One of the downfalls of having critters on the farm is every so often one will die. To dig a hole just kills me now a days (must be getting old or something like that)…if one of these scoop buckets were put on to push backwards…would it scoop a hole 2-3 feet deep if you kept scooping down in the same hole several times??? Most of my critters are smaller sized so a big hole is not needed…

    Thanks in advance
    Pam and Scott
    http://www.justkiddinfarm.com/
     
  12. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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    The tires spin when pushing in reverse,very little traction. Try puting the body in a gully and use the scoop to cover the body with dirt about 24 inces deep. Cover the body with lime before covering.
     
  13. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    the old farmer who sold us the farm used a scoop to hollow out a hill for his house. they have their place and in the right hands can work well. cad plans has a detailed rear loader. front end loaders can be very hard on front ends of tractors. dependent on the brand the loader you get may be next to useless! tend to over build and under use.also can tip a tractor over with a load transported to high .been there done that lived to tell.a rock fork on the back can move a lot of material as too stacking and turning compost done the same as a farmer filling a bunker silo. a lot depends on the skill of the operator
     
  14. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    CADPlans Corporation -- just found their website, looks like a great resource!
    Thanks, ford major.

    www.cadplans.com
     
  15. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    was going to get ross to post the web addy for cad plans,i am computor chalenged ,when the site locked up! good looking easy to follow.also foung a rear loader made in india but most likly as pricy as a fore end loader.hermits idea of a fork bucket or even bolt on tines may work . done the fork and wheelbarrow route too
     
  16. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    I found an outfit in Florida that is offering a 3 pt rear loader for $1200, I thought this was an item they stocked, but it may be that they've only got one used one available. King Equipment in Sebring.
    http://www.kingequipment.com/implements/index.htm

    From Appearances, looks ok to me...any feedback?
     
  17. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    We had a Parmeter (Parmiter?) rear loader similar to that. It was very handy but sold used for $500.
    Agdealer has a good search engine for this sort of thing. So does Iron Search (Luv their new format!)


    $1200 would buy a good used FEL, but if you only want an occasional loader those 3pth ones are fine. We use a rear round bale loader with the loader tractor to gather two bales at a time when loading wagons in the field.