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Weighed the biggest hog today and he is 226lbs and ready for the butcher. Three weeks earlier than last year.

Now the other three are close behind.

This is a good year for pork :yeeha:
 
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How did you weigh the pig? And how long did it take to get him that big?
 

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Unregistered said:
How did you weigh the pig? And how long did it take to get him that big?
We bought him in March beginning and he was three weeks old at that time.


MEASURING​

1. Girth Measurement: Take the heart-girth measurement. Your measuring tape needs to go around the body just behind the front legs and over the shoulder area. As an example for you I will use the measurements of Flower. Her girth measurement is 43 inches.
2. Square the result (Multiply the measurement by itself). Example: The measurement was 43 inches. 43 X 43 = 1,849
3. Length Measurement: Measure the length of your pig. Start at the top of his or her head right in between the ears and measure down to the start, or base, of the tail (not the end of the tail).
Flower's length is 39 inches.
4. Girth Result X Length: Take the girth measurement result (in the example above this was 1,849) and multiply that times the length of your pig. In our example this would be: 1,849 X 39 = 72,111.
5. Weight Calculation: Divide this result by 400, and you'll have a weight accurate to within about three percent. In our example: 72,111 divided by 400 = 180 pounds. Factoring in the 3% variance (5.4
pounds), this means Flower weighs between 174.6 and 185.4 pounds.

Credit for this formula goes to the Old Farmer's Almanac 1993
 

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Good deal for you Siryet. Are they all for your family? Big freezer :) ?
 
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Siryet, Thanks for the great expaination of wieght calculation. I grabbin the tape measurer and headin for the pig pen right now.
(time for a pig rodeo)
Travis
 

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Tango said:
Good deal for you Siryet. Are they all for your family? Big freezer :) ?
No we raise for our neighbors also. Just two of us here so we don't need a lot of meat. We fill two freezers each year. Wife and I eat well. Animals are all raised medication free and hormone free.

neighbors are cattle farmers who don't have the time to raise hogs. This year we raised 5, not many compared to your operation but we enjoy it

We usually keeo one for ourselves but this year because we had to butcher one early (belly Buster Hernia) we will have two.

Along with the two grass lambs we raise and the rabbits, chickens, ducks we have plenty of meat to eat.

We shy away from Beef, for no particular reason just sorta lost our taste for it.

We do have lamb bergers and Pork bergers so we don't miss hambergers.

thanks for asking
 

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Raising our own pigs does seem to reduce the amount of beef we consume too, and eleminated all purchases of pork except ribs. At 225-250 lbs. I can't get enough ribs to keep the smoker full, and not enough meat on them, and I am not going to mess with a 400+ angry hog. Boy do they taste good though, and it is amazing how lean th emeat is when they have not been pumped full of hormones and forced to grow at abnormal rates. The first year my wife did not believe we would eat a full hog in one year, second year we kept 1 and a half, this year she wants 2 :). I have to keep closer track of size this year though. Last year we got piglets that had a long frame and I kept arguing with everyone that they were getting too heavy, wife and help claimed they weren't big enough yet. Two of them ended up are 320 to 340 (I was right), so meat ended up a little tougher, so no guessing this year, we'll be measuring.
 
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