2 Stoves Connected To One Chimney

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by veme, Nov 28, 2006.

  1. veme

    veme Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,446
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Could someone explain to me why 2 stoves connected to one chimney is not recommended and against code in some places? :shrug:

    I have a cook stove & a coal/wood heater connected to the same masonry chimney. The coal heater is in the basement and the wood cook stove is above in the kitchen.
    The chimney was made with both stoves in mind.
    Thanks.
    veme
     
  2. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

    Messages:
    6,613
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2005
    Location:
    Near Traverse City Michigan
    even if I could find the code, it wouldnt say anything about why it is supose to be that way. The code books are written to be obeyed, not understood. They are just another way to teach compliance, and obedience to the masses.

    If I was only going to use one appliance at a time, I would try it, but I would never exhaust 2 wood burnning apliances that would be used at the same time into one chimney unless they were not in the house.
     

  3. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

    Messages:
    11,456
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2004
    Location:
    NW Pa./NY Border.
    Actually, conspiracy theories aside, there are issues with draft and carbon monoxide.
     
  4. veme

    veme Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,446
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Why? :shrug:
    veme
     
  5. veme

    veme Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,446
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    There doesn't seem to be a draft problem. The chimney draws so strong it can put out a candle (almost).
    What kind of carbon monoxide problem?

    veme
     
  6. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

    Messages:
    11,456
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2004
    Location:
    NW Pa./NY Border.
    Say you one vented into the pipe below the other... you burn the lower one. Number one the draft to the bottom will be inhibited by the upper stove (the one vented at the highest point of the stove pipe. While burning the upper one (and your draft will decreast dramatically on BOTH stoves) carbon monoxide could drop through your lower stove. Carbon Monoxide is a strange gas.
    Remember a chimney does more than just let smoke escape, it sucks air to feed the fire and will suck it from where ever possible.

    I suggest reading this: http://www.mostwoodstoves.com/articles/getfiredup.htm
    and this: http://www.vogelzang.com/Manuals/pb65lMnl.htm
     
  7. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    I grew up with a brick chimney up from the basement throw the center of the house. We had a big wood and coal stove in the livingroom, and a wood burning cook stove in the kitchen, both hooked to it and both worked at the same time with out any lack of draft to either stove. The inside spacing of the flue was 6x6. Having hot smoke increases the draft in the flue.
     
  8. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,180
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    WI
    Never heard a flue called a "cubbie".

    It is the number of flues that are important, not the number of chimneys, for VEME. It is one appliance per flue. If you run more than one per flue, don't let the insurance company or building inspector see it. And hope you never have a fire and have to make a claim with an illegal installation.
     
  9. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,736
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    north central Pennsylvania
    We have had for the past 26 years 2 wood stoves hooked into one chimney that we built new for us in this old farm house. The one in the basement is a "homemade" barrel stove and the kitchen stove uses wood and coal..sometimes when it's very cold !! l Never have had a problem with the 2 going "full blast" during our cold northern PA winters here. We do though..clean this chimney a few times during the winters months just to be extra safe. We only have one stove hooked into the livingroom chimney. Maybe our old house isn't air tight..but do have a little gadget that tells us if there is carbon monoxide in the air. Are we doomed..or just been lucky in not being killed dead in our beds all these years..I'm not being funny about it..it's serious. Just never heard about not being able to hook 2 stoves into 1 chimney before. It's done a lot in our area !! :shrug:
     
  10. veme

    veme Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,446
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Helena-
    This is the EXACT situation that we have!
    I think the problem may be with CO (CO2?) or people putting oil appliance with a wood or gas appliance. But I'm not 100% sure.

    veme

    edited for CO or CO2 :shrug:
     
  11. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

    Messages:
    15,059
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Between Crosslake and Emily Minnesota
    The size (or area) of the door of a wood-burning appliance dictates the size (or area) of the flue. Large, open fireplaces require large flues. Air-tight woodburning stoves require smaller flues. Don't quote me on this, but I believe the cross-sectional area of a flue must be at least 25% ot the cross-sectional area of the woodburner's door or of the fireplace's opening.

    If the flue is too small for the opening of the woodburner (or conversly, if the door or opening is too large for the flue), the appliance will smoke when you open that door. The more woodburning appliances you have hooked to a single flue, the more likely you'll get smoke into the room if both doors are opened at the same time....because now, the area of the flue should be based on the area of both doors or openings.

    The other problem is with two appliances hooked to one flue has to do with air pressure. Smoke will take the path of least resistance. If the upstairs woodburner is not burning and its door is left open for some reason, the smoke from the downstairs woodburner can go right out its door.

    One should not expect a problem when both woodburners are operating and both the doors are closed. The problems arise when one burner is going and the other is cool and/or when the doors are opening simultaneously on both woodburners.
     
  12. dcross

    dcross Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,002
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Location:
    East central WI
    My dad keeps telling me I shouldn't have a gas water heater and a gas furnace sharing one chimney:)
     
  13. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

    Messages:
    6,613
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2005
    Location:
    Near Traverse City Michigan
    lol, yeah I know
     
  14. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,386
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Location:
    Wisconsin.. Zone 5
    Found this today:
    http://experts.about.com/q/Chimney-...-fireplaces.htm

    Of course there are those that think "codes" are made to be broken, because they are the work of , the trades(expensive work), big brother(tax, tax,) or just to be a pain.

    They are there to save your life.