2 day old jersey calfs

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by candywilber, Feb 8, 2005.

  1. candywilber

    candywilber New Member

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    Here is my ordeal. My feiance brung home two jersey bull calfs that are about 2-3 days old. They came from a livestock sale near us. I have bottle fed a jersey bull before but he was a few weeks old, and allready starting to eat on his own.. I have no clue how to start theese calfs out. I am kinda paniking because I have tried searching up what the best way to start theese babies out and I hear diffrent things. Theese babies are verry skinny allthough verry alert and over all healthy looking/acting. I live in Michigan and rite now we are still dealing with cold weather in the 30's and we have no heated barn so what we did was placed them in a two horse trailer and boxed them in with a cattle pannel attached so they can wonder outside but can't stray from shelter.
    This is what I have found out so far that really made sence for starting a calf out from birth.
    vit.B, J-5, vit. E, Tsv 2 (how much to give them and for how long?)
    for 14 days feed colostrum (how much a day, is this mixed in with the calf milk, given straight, or one bottle this and one more milk?)
    treatment for scours is penicillin, sulfea pills and oral electrolytes.(how much do I give, how often, how long and do I use any one of them or all three???)
    I found in one place to only feed twice a day and up to two quarts at a time but this seems too little for new borns. I was planning on feeding them two quarts three four times a day but then I read that this could cause problems cause they will be over fed.
    I really need some help. I don't want to loose them because I over/under fed them. the brand of milk replacer that I am useing is INSTANT CALF REPLACER and has 20%protein, 24%fat, it is suposed to aid aginst them from scouring. Is this a good replacer? how much shoudl I feed them?
     
  2. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    They don't need colostrum for 14 days; the lining of a calf's stomach can absorb it only for 12-24 hours and after that it's wasted.

    I'd suggest 3 feedings a day because the warm milk will help keep their body temperature up. (I'll let someone else recommend the amount, as I'm used to dealing with Holsteins, and they're bigger and thus eat more.)

    Make sure the horse trailer is parked out of the prevailing wind and has a good layer of straw inside that they can snuggle down in. Muck it out at each feeding time so it is kept as clean and dry as possible.

    Make sure the milk replacer you're using is actual milk protein and NOT soy-based. I've heard bad things about those soy-based products.

    If the calves are shivering, you could try making little jackets for them out of old sweatshirts, blankets or whatever you happen to have on hand.

    Good luck! Aren't calves cute?! :)
     

  3. allenslabs

    allenslabs Saanen & Boer Breeder

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    We just got a little beef bull calf ourselves on saturday and I am pouring a lot of effort myself. We are still having problems with ours as he had a real rough time at that auction and was there maybe 2 days w/no mommy. We got him from a trader who realized he had the wrong cow calf set. But anyway we noticed him to be real weak and stiff legged and the vet had me give him selenium. So if you start noticing continually stiff movement you might look into that. And he said that it's best to have replacer that has animal fat versus vegetable fat. Good luck with your babies! They are just so cute!
     
  4. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    Well I hope you fed theses guys something. Jeserys should get half a bottle 3x a day to much milk and they will scour. Get a whole milk medicated milk replacer, no soy. Warm milk like you would feed a baby. Store milk will also do fine. Treat for scours ect with oxytetracycline in there milk. Add a little bit of red cell to there milk if worried they need extra vitamins. Try to avoid needles as it will only stress them more.
     
  5. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Glad to see this post....we just got a 6 day old heifer from a neighbor who found the mama cow shot...she had had colostrum but was one mighty hungry little girl. Have her on three feedings of 2qts. replacer a day plus a bottle of warm water after each as she isn't really drinking much from the pail. Fresh hay and a little bit of calf starter that she is nibbling at which we replace daily. She is a live wire and adorable...first calf I've raised in ages as our mamas do it themselves. Had a mama in the stanchion feeding her the first couple of days but she just plain wasn't gonna take her....Honey has filled out nicely,stools staying firm. Deal is we will sell her at 5-6 months with our neighbors and split the money....we have time to fiddle with her and they don't. Biggest challenge is keeping my DH from killing her with kindness....he can't stand to hear her blat and thinks she is hungry!!! DEE
     
  6. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Have not raised calves from a sale barn but we have been raising Jerseys on this farm for decades.

    We feed 2 bottles a day for the first week or so (this is generally colostrum, but that is because we store the colostrum collected in the first three days rather than throwing it away and then feed it up before switching to milk replacer for heifers and junk milk for bulls), then train them to a bucket. They end up getting about 5 pounds total of liquids a day for a couple of weeks and then it is upped to six pounds 2x a day. The bottles hold about four and a half to five pounds of liquid, its a two quart bottle. When using a milk replacer keep in mind that you are going to want to use less than the suggested amount for Holsteins.We use a milk replacer by Land O' Lakes. The milk replacers generally come with a cup to measure it out. I would start with 3/4 of the amount they suggest mixed with water (you want the bottle to end up lukewarm, just as a human's baby bottle would be). See how they do on it. If they start to scour then cut back on the amount of milk replacer and see what happens. As they age they will be able to handle more. But it also depends on the replacer. If you could list who makes the replacer, maybe someone will have more personal experience with it. I have worked with Land O' Lakes and Cow's Match (Jersey Match).

    They would be skinny because they hadn't eaten in awhile and little calves just look skinny right before it is time to eat.

    I would assume they will scour a bit at first because of all the stress and the new bacteria.

    Make sure whereever they are kept is draft free and dry! But make sure it is well ventilated as well. With the two togetehr they can help keep each other warm.

    Are there any farmers nearby you could talk to? A kind farmer is generally the most valuable.

    Also, you can start offering them a starter grain (usually in pellet form) right now. They will not eat much if any of it for the first week but they may start to nibble at it and it will help to train them to put there head down.

    Good luck with your new babies!
     
  7. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Keep in mind that everytime you give a calf antiboticis you kill all the bacteria within its body includeing the benficial ones that aid in digestion. After each injection you need to replace that bacteria from either acidopholis milk or yogurt, and there are other sources. Without the benifical bacteria boost you are creating scours. Put 'raising calves' into search for many older posts about this subject.
     
  8. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    Good point Moonpup. You can also give it probios pills.

    I put the injectable oxy right in the milk , no shots
     
  9. Christina R.

    Christina R. Well-Known Member

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    I was stuck feeding my young 'un twice a day, but i heard 3 times a day was better. The bag the milk replacer comes in will tell you how much to feed, but you have to have a good guesstimate as to what the boys weigh. When I went into this, I remember being overwhelmed with how many diefferent things the could get sick with, but many calves don't get sick. You'll do okay.
     
  10. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have read that it is bad for young ruminants to be fed water, as it dilutes the milk in their tummies so that it doesn't "curd" and stay in their systems long enough. It can thus cause scours. If your calf was still with mama, she would not likely be drinking water this young. I'd stick to the milk.
    mary
     
  11. Valmai

    Valmai Well-Known Member

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    mary tx I dont bottle feed my calves water but I always have water available, they do need it because they are being fed differently to what they would if they were still with mum. Hand reared calves will start drinking water in the first week if its there.
    candywilber could you stack some old hay around the horse trailer or put some tarpaulin over it? Wind and drafts are very bad for the little ones. With calves who have had a rough time, it is much better to give them little and often rather than one big drink a day.
    If you are using a good quality CMR they should not need anything else as long as they remain in good health.
    allenslabs are the knees swollen or warm? Is the navel clean? Could it possibly be navel ill?