15 pound chicken?

Discussion in 'Poultry' started by brumer0, Aug 24, 2017.

  1. brumer0

    brumer0 Well-Known Member

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    So here I am watching Netflix's Steak Revolution and finding it a pretty decent show. At 48 minutes this English guy is talking about a 16th century book he read about 7kg chickens. He mentions that he was able to raise a bird of such size.

    Huh?! I have turkeys (Narragansett hens) that don't get that big. Is this guy full of it? What breed would be that large?!
     
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  2. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    Average broiler chickens if left to grow too long. That wouldn't be 16th century though,

    A few of the Oriental game breeds.

    Jersey Giants.
    Just to name a few possibilities
     

  3. Clod Kicker

    Clod Kicker Well-Known Member

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    Sumo chickens?
     
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  4. barnbilder

    barnbilder Well-Known Member

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    O'Shamo, Kulang Asil, Malay, Saipans could all hit those kind of weights but in many cases would be overweight. Brahmans and Jersey Giants could do it. Probably at that time there was a bird called the chittagong, a large asil type bird that got pretty big, langshans got big, and Cochins or something crossed on some of those. The chittagong ended up in a lot of our modern breeds, but there aren't any around now. Comparitively, the hardfeather orientals are hard to get to an impressive weight like that, they are tall, but not real thick. Ive got birds that can eat off a trash can lid, but only weigh ten or twelve pounds. The Chinese feather footed derivatives carry a lot more weight and some of it is feather. Have heard of a 22 pound asil in India, have seen pictures, impressive bird, legs like sticks of firewood and head the size of a man's fist. Not many like that in the states, if any.
     
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  5. Forcast

    Forcast Well-Known Member

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    My Jersey giants got as heavy
     
  6. brumer0

    brumer0 Well-Known Member

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    Wow. Thanks everybody for your replies. I have a lot of reading to do about all the breeds mentioned here. I would love to have dual purpose breeds, and many of the aforementioned breeds could probably fill that desire.

    The thought of a 15lb chicken still blows my mind...
     
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  7. barnbilder

    barnbilder Well-Known Member

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    Some of these birds that get really big take an incredibly long time and a lot of feed to do so. With some of the bigger birds I have dealt with, it wasn't a matter of just butchering them early to save on feed, either. Nothing but bone and feather until they get done building their frame, and they only fill out once they reach nearly mature size. For the big birds it's more of a fancy thing, and not so much for the utilitarian aspect of raising chickens. If you've just got to have them, and want to make use of the extra cockerels, try crossing a couple breeds, the extra shot of hybrid vigor will make them grow a little quicker. I did some cochin turken crosses that grew good, impressive size and fairly fast growing. The hens laid much better than the pure cochins. Right now I have some Ga Noi Wyandotte crosses that I have been butchering, nice carcass and good flavor.
     
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  8. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    Barnbilder! Would love to see more of your Ga Noi. Currently have an extra Ganoi stag I am about to separate off (single hatchling) and put with my laying hens for lack of a better situation. Dad is supposedly pure feathered ga noi and Mama is naked, which in this case means there was some Turken in her background somewhere. Both good birds for what they are.
    The stag looks feathered right now, but when he was a little younger I thought he would take on his Mama's NN traits...a fine little guy indeed for what he is.
     
  9. Alder

    Alder Well-Known Member

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    That's the problem. Dual purpose birds like the Jersey Giants take forever to get up to size. I hate to sound like an Evangelist, but the best dual purpose birds I've found are the Welp Hatchery Slow White broilers. They are broiler sized (big) in 11-12 weeks for butcher, but they will breed naturally, (not double-breasted like CornishX, with decent strong legs) so you can keep a rooster and raise their chicks. The hens make excellent layers - big eggs, consistent and early layers of brown eggs.

    They are like a BIG, fast growing White Rock.
     
  10. MichaelZ

    MichaelZ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think you would have to mix in some #8 lead shot with your grit :)
     
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  11. dyrne

    dyrne Well-Known Member

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    I ordered some Jersey Giants some time back in the mistaken belief that the bigger roosters would be a big help protecting the hens. Some things to watch out for are that they're much bigger than the hens of other breeds so their ah, attempts to breed might be problematic for the ladies. They also seem to take quite a bit longer to mature than say my egyptian fayoumi's do -those guys are awesome btw. With all that said, the Jersey's are a cool bird and I think I'll always have a few around for special occasion meals and to freak out guests.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017
  12. Yellowsnow

    Yellowsnow Well-Known Member

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    Cornish Cross will get upwards of 15 lbs. Most will die before that, but many can make it to that point.

    I'll take some pics tomorrow of some. Butchered some last week that dressed out to 9.5 lbs.

    Cochin and Brahma regularly get to 12 lbs. I'm sure with some select breeding they could get to 15 easily. But like Barnbilder said, slow growing.
     
  13. Skandi

    Skandi Well-Known Member

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    I would think the man was talking about a capon they were pretty common and it can double the "normal" weight of the bird.
     
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  14. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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