woodstoves with long burn time

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by TexasArtist, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

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    what wood stove out there have the longest burn time?? I'm thinking of replacing the one I have it just wasn't made for heating a house a long time. BRRRRRRR
     
  2. mtc

    mtc Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure I follow your question. Any woodstove IF it's rated to the size of the area you're trying to heat and IF you're feeding it properly, and IF you're not dealing with an uninsulated house whose walls tend to open to the outside when it gets windy (don't ask me how I know that), should keep you warm.

    However, having said that, Vermont Castings makes nice stoves with catalytic converters that are a little more efficient in how they burn their wood. (you burn the partially combusted gases too.)

    We have a parlor stove and it more than heats our two story house to a comfortable temp on most days. (Every so often we'll turn the circulating fan on to help the air flow, but that's about it.)

    Maybe if you provided some more details it'd help with the advice people can give you?
     

  3. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

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    I've got one of those little cheap chinese vogelzang things from tractor supply. The box is so small it's hard to keep the right amount of wood in it.
     
  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    The longest burn time will be from a true "air-tight" stove with the largest firebox. In other words, filling the firebox full of a large air-tight stove and turning the air controller to allow almost no air into the stove will give you a very, very long burn time while the firewood smoulders away. Of course, this "long burn time" will provide little heat and also create a ton of creosote in the chimney.
     
  5. -TWO-

    -TWO- Well-Known Member

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    We bought a Quadra-fire 4300 this year & I like it alot. Its a super efficient, clean burning stove. It will easily hold a fire for 10 hours with the draft shut down. Running it wide open I fill it up every 4 to 5 hours. Its rated to heat up to 2800 sq.ft.@ 70,000 BTU's. It has an efficiency rating of, up to 76.9% (which is excellent).
     
  6. Auric

    Auric Registered Doofus

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    Check out Blaze King. They advertise a 40 hour burn time, but that's with a full firebox of about 90 pounds of oak. I wanted to get one of these this year, but they were back ordered and wouldn't have one until January. I settled for a Morso 3160, and am actually pretty happy with it. I can get the burn to last about 7 hours. If I fill the stove at about 11pm, I still have enough embers by 6am to get the fire going again; all without closing down the air intake!
     
  7. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We bought a Char-Master "Chalet" a couple of years ago after doing lots of research on furnaces. We replaced an older woodburning furnace with it. We put wood in it 3 times a day in below zero weather, to keep the house at 68 to 70 degrees. I usually don't fill it as full as possible, unless we are going to be gone for more than 10 or 12 hours. We have an old 2 story farm house with a bit less than 2000sf total on both floors. It will still have a good bed of coals putting out lots of heat after 14 hours if I use good dry wood, even when it is 25 below, and I don't really know how long it would hold a fire if I worked at getting the maximum amount of wood in it.

    edit to add link: http://www.charmaster.com/wood.html
     
  8. Watcher48

    Watcher48 Well-Known Member

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    My woodstove for the house is basically a peice of pipe (23") welded into a big box with a door at the end. The blower blows around the pipe and into the duct work. Will burn as long a 12 hours on a load. Generally I reload about every six.

    The stove for the shop is made out of a 250 gal propane tank. It will go 4-6 hours on a load.
    Both depend on the ind of wood your burning. I even burn sawdust in the shop stove and it will go for 3 hours. I just put a pipe in the middle and pack sawdust around it. Take the pipe out and light it off. Works great.
     
  9. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    The species and size of the wood your burning has a lot to do with the burn time.
     
  10. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have the mid size of the Vermont Castings stove described in the link below. With good wood (seasoned oak/hickory/maple), I have ample coals to quickly get a good fire going after eight hours. With less than optimal wood (poplar/gum), I can go six hours between loads. The larger stove in the link below is supposed to go 12 hours between loads. I usually leave the air supply open all the way to insure a complete burn and minimize the creosote accumulation. Plus, it provides incentive to get up in the morning to rekindle the fire...rather than lying around in the bed too long. Best wishes on finding a stove that works for you.

    http://www.vermontcastings.com/content/products/productdetails.cfm?id=311
     
  11. RVcook

    RVcook Defending the Highground

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  12. Pouncer

    Pouncer Well-Known Member

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    I have a Blaze King Ultra, just installed this past summer. I love it, it burns well and holds great-easily over 12 hours. And that's with fairly green birch with a little spruce. It has a large firebox, and we got the circulating fans and I am glad we did. We have around 1800 sq. ft to heat on one level and at temps below zero we can do this easily with just using fans to draw colder air out of the rooms.

    We check the pipe every three to four weeks and typically have only a cup or two soot that comes loose. And we only need to remove ashes maybe every ten days to two weeks, depending on how much spruce we use.

    I am gone every day for nearly 12 hours, and I usually have a either a big bed of coals left, or even some log parts when I get home. I just move them flat into a bed, reload, and let 'er rip for a half hour-brings up the temperature quickly in my house.
     
  13. ericjeeper

    ericjeeper Well-Known Member

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    To heat a house..Many different things come into play. It is called "heat loss" A structure is going to lose a certain amount of heat due to windows,doors and lack of insulation.So to heat a house you have to provide heat plus enough extra to account for the heat lost.
    Many old homes require 100,000 btus per hour to heat.Ok in a pound of firewood there is roughly 6500 btus. It will take around 16 pounds of wood consumed to heat the house.Now to take in consideration inefficient woodstove. Maybe as low as 60-80% Meaning 40-20% of the heat went straight out the chimney.
    So it is like Cabin fever says.. Long burn times are not what every home needs.
    Someone mention 90 pounds of Oak lasting for 40 hours. well it produced 585,000 btus.. Not even considering what went up the flue. So in 40 hours it basically produced enough heat to heat most old farmhouses for about 6-8 hours. So at that 40 hour burn time.. Homeowner was likely cold.And the flue likely got a pretty good coating of creosote to boot..Seasoned wood will make creosote when smoldered over a long period of time.

    I would recommend looking for an airtight stove,Still in production today,With as large of firebox as possible.
    Oh and on cold nights. set your alarm clock for midway through the night.Wake up and go feed the Magic box, As it has magically made all the wood you put in it earlier disappear.
     
  14. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    There are so many variables that two people with the same stove can get much different burn times. Any air tight burner should give good results.

    My new Heartwood is wonderful. The site says it has a 5 hour burn time, but I can put a few logs in at bedtime, and the house will still be comfy warm in the morning with a good bed of coals to toss in a couple more logs and have a roaring blaze in minutes. I get the longer burn time because I have a damper installed in the exhaust pipe.

    About once a week I toss a handful of rock salt in when I have a thick bed of coals. The salt keeps the creosote burnt out so I don't have chimney fires.
     
  15. Cartman

    Cartman Well-Known Member

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    We have a Buck stove that is rated to heat 3200 sq ft.
    It has a catalist and I get it hot enough to close the damper or ingage the catalist and shut it down about half way. holds a fire for 12 hours. With the blower on it heats our 2055 sq ft 1 level nicely. 22 degrees and windy today and had to open the window for a while. I agree with the others the wood you are burning makes a big difference on how long the fire lasts.
     
  16. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    I love your numbers.....

    But you are double discounting the efficiency.

    Wood has 8000 BTU's per pound. 100,000 thousand btu's per hour is absolutely mind blowing heat. ;)



    To the original poster...

    We have a England stove works stove. They are sold by lowes and Home Depot. They are made in the USA, meet UL and EPA ratings. They are rather well built for the money.

    Mine will heat for 9 hours with a full load burning bright (NO CREOSOTE).
    keep coals for 14 hours or so total.
    It's rated at 70,000 BTU's
    The stove is the 30NCL rated AT 78%


    If you wish to hear about stoves (more than one could possibly need) Go to www.hearth.com and check out the message board.
     
  17. ericjeeper

    ericjeeper Well-Known Member

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  18. neolady

    neolady Well-Known Member

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  19. arbutus

    arbutus Well-Known Member

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    www.Hearth.com as mentioned above. I *think* they had a comparison page with several different manufacturers, stove models, prices, and btu output there, but it may be somewhere else.

    Based in part on the feedback from hearth.com I purchased the largest Pacific Energy stove. I wanted a large plate steel stove and it was 800 dollars cheaper than the comparable sized Quadrafire and had the 3/8 inch thick top that was none of the competitors had.

    I have a thermometer right on top of the stove just in front of the pipe. I can load it with oak or apple at 10 pm and still have coals and a 300 degree temp at 6 am when I get up for work.

    I have to throttle the stove back most of the way during the day or it overheats.

    My furnace doesn't kick on when the stove is going - even on COLD nights, and the house stays warm.

    Supposedly the Englander stoves sold at the big box stores are a good value, good performing, and long lasting too.

    Probably the largest contributor to long burn time is firebox size. There is no substitute for being able to put three extra 8 inch oak logs in for an all night fire.

    The modern EPA approved stoves aren't truly airtight either - the airtight refers to the door, and the fact that the air entering the stove is routed so that it is preheated and burns with maximum efficiency. You can throttle them way back, but about 25% of the air opening will remain open on ALL modern EPA rated stoves. Some stove brands make it more convenient to modify the air inlet shutter than others. However, without draft, creosote formation becomes a REAL problem if you haven't burned all the volatiles out of the wood. This isn't something I have tried or recommend, just an interesting tidbit.

    As I was doing research on stoves last year (when I bought mine) I came across several claims of fantastic burn times. I told you about my 8 hour burn time above - that leaves the stove hot enough to heat the house and be useful. I think most stoves are in this range - 8 or 10 hours, and claims of much longer burn times (24 or 36 hours) are based on the last glowing ember. I can rake way back in the ash after 24 hours and come up with a couple of glowing embers too, but at that point the outside of the stove was cool to the touch several hours ago and had ceased to be a useful heat source. The one possible exception to this is the Blaze King brand ... they make a stove with a much larger firebox than the 3 to 3.5 cubic foot max size that the other manufactures top out at.
     
  20. wvstuck

    wvstuck Mountaineers are free

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    Englander here, replaced an old Fisher with a new air tight stove from Lowe's $799 retail but the floor model was negotiated for $700 even.
    http://summersheat.com/13-nc.html

    I added a pipe (cast iron) damper, I can let air in and keep heat in at the same time. Plus a good brush down the pipe every 30 days or so takes care of any creosote.

    I am heating 1800 sq feet with no problem. I use Oak, Hickory, Ash and Sycamore as my wood mix. I'm in my prep room and very comfortable in the coldest part of the house, looking at my wife in the living room sitting cozy on the couch knitting herself a new scarf and hat.