which mulch works best for a high wind area?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by getoutoftown, Jan 30, 2009.

  1. getoutoftown

    getoutoftown Member

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    Could you please let me know which mulch works best for a high wind area? We are on a high hilly area in the Texas Hill Country with lots of wind and almost all of the mulch we put down last year in our garden beds has blown away - so we want to do it right this year.
    Thanks in advance for any advice. Jane
     
  2. JMJones0424

    JMJones0424 Well-Known Member

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    What are you mulching?
    - if trees or shrubs, use a thick layer of hardwood chip, 3 inches minimum. Most people don't use anywhere near enough mulch.
    - if vegetables, use straw up to 6 inches deep. Water above the straw if using drip line, not below. The straw will settle and produce a "skin" that will resist wind. You have to water very slowly, or the water will just run off. If wind still blows that away, then your problem is too much wind, not mulch type. A vegetable garden will need protection from high winds.

    If nothing else works, you can always use landscape fabric, but I don't like it because it doesn't add organic matter and in Texas it will BAKE the soil during the summer.
     

  3. getoutoftown

    getoutoftown Member

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    if trees or shrubs --> Yes JM Jones, the mulch is needed around our trees and shrubs only. Do you know if HOME DEPOT would sell hardwood chip mulch - or should I call around and see if any nurseries have this? Would any hardwood chip mulch work - or is there a specific hardwood chip mulch we should buy? Thanks, Jane
     
  4. Wanderer0101

    Wanderer0101 Well-Known Member

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    shredded native cedar
     
  5. Bruenor

    Bruenor Well-Known Member

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    How about asphalt? :)
     
  6. JMJones0424

    JMJones0424 Well-Known Member

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    Home Depot sells numerous types of hardwood mulch, packaged in easy to handle bags. You will be paying a premium for packaging, but if you are mulching a small area, it's worth it to have small easy to carry bags.

    Nursery centers do not produce hardwood mulch, they resell it. If you are buying in bulk, cut out the middleman by contacting landscaping services to find their source of hardwood mulch. Local city or county agencies may be able to point you in the right direction as well.

    The city near me picks up tree trimmings from its residents and shreds it, then offers it for free to citizens and for a small fee to county residents. This would probably be the most cost-effective source if available.

    As far as species of hardwood, I don't believe that it matters too much. Some say that certain species have alleopathic substances that would make them inappropriate, but if the material is aged, those substances decay and don't have any detrimental effect.

    The determining factor is chip size. You want chunky, bulky material, not fine chips like those sold for bedding material.

    Pine straw is another option if you are in the high limestone containing region of central Texas. It is quite acidic, and will moderate high pH as it decomposes. Pine straw, when compared to hardwood mulch, is more of a fire hazard though, so if this is near the home I might consider something else.
     
  7. JMJones0424

    JMJones0424 Well-Known Member

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    You're kidding right?
     
  8. farmerjon

    farmerjon Well-Known Member

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    Go rubber...No im not kidding, Cost a little more, but never rots looks like real muclch, Drains better, ezier on the hands when you are weeding, will not blow away. I own a lawn maintenance buisness and sell traditinal mulch in bulk and I still try to recomend rubber when ever I can. Plus its recycling:goodjob:
     
  9. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

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    I read that native mulch is best. Doesn't blow away or erode as fast. If there is a tree service near you they'll usually give it away. We have such a service in Dallas & you can go get it by the pickup load-free.

    Patty
     
  10. Bruenor

    Bruenor Well-Known Member

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    Well, it would keep down the weeds. :p
     
  11. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Look into getting free shredded Christmas tree mulch about this time. Almost every major municipality now shreds their trees. There's enough woody material in it to keep it from blowing away and lots of nutrients in the fresh needles and green bark.

    Martin