What to do with UNRIPE apples?

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by GoatNamedDunn, Sep 2, 2008.

  1. GoatNamedDunn

    GoatNamedDunn Well-Known Member

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    The apples arent even ripe yet, but they are falling off the tree. I think its the birds... but anywho, I don't want them to rot... smells like I got some kind of apple liquor factory going on under my tree if I let them go. I think they are too acidic for compost?? Just curious as to what you all think I should do with them. I want to get them off the ground before they start to ferment... attracks the yellow jackets.
     
  2. Use Less

    Use Less Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They could have bugs or worms in 'em. Weather changes can also produce a "drop", especially if it was suddenly extra hot. Or sometimes wind & rain. You can gather them up, trim thoroughly and try making sauce. Or if you have a press or juicer, you could try making cider and add sweetening. Or vinegar. Or apple wine. Chickens, ducks & gees will eat them. Goats will eat some, but be careful about quantity and food balance, so you don't make them sick. Sue
     

  3. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You could cook them up for the pectin in them and use it for making jelly and jam. I just made applesauce from apples that were a bit on the green side. With sugar and cinnamon in it, the applesauce was really good. Some of the jars have a layer of clear gel on the bottom and the applesauce is very, very thick...I'm sure it is pectin. I"m thinking of taking some of the applesauce and mixing it with peaches or blackberries and experimenting with cooking it up for jam. Peach/apple or blackberry/apple sounds like it would tast pretty good. I figure that if it doesn't jell enough, it'll be pancake sauce, if it does, then jam. :)
     
  4. GoatNamedDunn

    GoatNamedDunn Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the idea's! I didn't know you could make pectin from apples, neato!
     
  5. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    I'd like to hear more about how to do that.... Manygoatsnmore... could you teach us?
     
  6. sheepish

    sheepish Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We let the kids throw them to the sheep in the next pasture. It's great exercise. The sheep love them and the kids get great fun out of seeing the sheep chase them.
     
  7. BlueHeronFarm

    BlueHeronFarm Well-Known Member

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    Get some pigs, quick! ;)
     
  8. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They compost very well, too.

    Making pectin is not at all difficult, and apples that are not quite ripe are the best source. I really like pectin from crab apples.

    Just cut your apples into halves or quarters. Put them into a big pot, and barely cover with cold water. Cook them down very slowly, stirring occasionally so they don't stick to the bottom of the pot. (A heat diffuser is VERY helpful when doing this!)

    When the apples are pretty mushy, put them into a jelly bag (old t-shirt with the bottom sewn shut and a broom handle through the shoulders, hanging between two chairs, is what works me). Let the apples drain into a large pan or food safe bucket. Some people squeeze the apple sack to get more juice out, but I don't do that because I don't want the jelly to be cloudy.

    The measurements of pectin:sugar are about 5 cups pectin to 7 cups sugar. Be sure to add enough sugar, and to boil the daylights out of the fruit/sugar/pectin mixture for a full minute after it comes to a full rolling boil. STIR IT SO IT DOESN"T STICK!

    It's so gratifying to make your own, rather than having to spend money on packaged stuff.
     
  9. Ohio dreamer

    Ohio dreamer 1/2 bubble off plumb

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    How far are they from ripe? If they aren't roting or have any holes you can put them in a brown paper bag for a while and they will ripen.
     
  10. hillsidedigger

    hillsidedigger Well-Known Member

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    We have put up dozens of jars of apple butter and apple sauce with not so ripe apples picked from trees. Note: The apples we use are not good eating aplles even if they are ripe.
     
  11. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    if you mix about 1/3 unripe apples in with ripe ones you can make jelly without pectin or lemon juice.
     
  12. GoatNamedDunn

    GoatNamedDunn Well-Known Member

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    They are pretty far from being ripe... they usualy ripen the last off september, so a good 3 weeks away.
     
  13. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    if kept cold, they should keep fine until others are ripe.
     
  14. Ohio dreamer

    Ohio dreamer 1/2 bubble off plumb

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    Brown bag trick should work, 3 weeks isn't that far out. They may never be as good as the tree ripened ones, but cooked into a pie, canned, dried, etc they should be fine.

    My mom picks green plums and not ripe pears all the time and ripens them in a bag. Pears will be ready to go about a week before the tree, so she can get a jump on her canning and baking.