What can I do with corn cobs?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by bunnylover, May 13, 2008.

  1. bunnylover

    bunnylover Well-Known Member

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    Bought several large bags of corn still on the cob for the chickens. I shell about 8 ears a day for the chickens, and the corn cobs are piling up fast. Any ideas for them?
     
  2. tn_junk

    tn_junk Living Simply

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    How about a basket of them by the procelain throne.:nana:
     

  3. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    They make good fire starters. We would soak a few in kerosene for a very few minutes and then use them to start a fire in the wood burning range.

    As galump pointed out they were once used as toilet paper replacement.
     
  4. oldie

    oldie Member

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    The cobs burn well in our cook stove and wood heater
     
  5. GrannyG

    GrannyG Well-Known Member

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    If you are a crafty person, they make such cute little magnets...the corncobs are cut into slices, about 1/2 inch or less thick. Little sunbonnets are glued onto the corncob..tiny eyes...just a cute little face. The magnet is glued onto the back, under the sunbonnet. Makes a cute item for a craft store or little gift. Most of the ones I have seen use gingham material in pastel colors for the little bonnets.
     
  6. Lilandra

    Lilandra talk little, listen much

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    grind them up for animal bedding
    [​IMG]
     
  7. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If ya got any stumps. pile the cobs on and lite a fire. the cobbs burn inward and will burn a stump right down into a hole
    And as said they work good in the stove. just don't get carried away they burn HOT!

    Roll them in lard and then birdseed. Nailem up

    Make corncobb jelly

    And there is an article in some silly mag called countryside small stock journal that has an article
    http://www.countrysidemag.com/issues/86/86-3/D_L_Flyger.html
     
  8. wildhorse

    wildhorse Well-Known Member

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    Make corn cob pipes and sell them at tourist shops.
     
  9. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Make redneck backscratchers for all your relatives.

    BTW...a redneck backscratcher is a corncob with a stick inserted into one end. Drill a hole in the other end and tie a string through it for hanging.
     
  10. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    If you have a persistant soft spot that always turns into a mudhole (for example where livestock approach a barn or water tank) keep throwing corncobs in. With enough corncobs it will firm up just like 4" rock will.
     
  11. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    Fire starters for one thing. I use them for that. I also keep a bucket of nice soft corncobs in the outhouse. Work better than toilet paper since the mice generally don't chew them up like they do a roll of paper.

    Guests are usually shocked that A. I have an outhouse, B. that I still use an outhouse despite having indoor plumbing and C. that there are actually corncobs in there to use.

    Like up north says, if you have enough they're good to fill in muddy spots.
     
  12. wwubben

    wwubben Well-Known Member

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    Pile the white ones and red ones in separate piles by the throne.Use two red ones and then one white one to see if you need another red one.
     
  13. silentcrow

    silentcrow Furry Without A Clue

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    As Ravenlost said, back scratchers...I've made a few:D Also, my dad made beads out of some. I've been wanting to make a few myself, they look really interesting and would most likely hold a dye well.
     
  14. MiniMama

    MiniMama Love the Country

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    Well, most of the ways of using corn cobs make sense, although I have to say, using them for one's bathroom hygiene is not one of them. Now, Sears catalogs I understand. You can wad them up a few times to, ahem, soften them for use. But, corn cobs!? We had an outhouse when I was a kid, and I don't recall ever using cobs, thank goodness! Maybe I'm missing something, but they just don't sound very comfortable to me. LOL!

    Oh, and Quint, although I do admit that it does seem a little odd to have an outhouse, when you have indoor plumbing, there's an advantage to it. You won't have to worry about leaks, or changing out pipes, or how much water is being used up with each flush! You'll never have to worry about spending hard-earned money to put in a new leach line, or septic system! LOL! Thinking about you having an outhouse made me think of my husband's grandpa, who lived in Georgia. My husband remembers that his grandpa had an outhouse, because he would not allow a bathroom in the "big" house. He didn't think it was civilized!:D
     
  15. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Too funny!!!! obviously a former user LOL
     
  16. Justaplain

    Justaplain Well-Known Member

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    Find somebody who smokes hams and bacon. Cob smoked is the best. Check Harringtons store in VT.

    How much would you want for a grain bag full?? bcs
     
  17. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I'll tell ya why I have one. When you're outside doing chores and nature calls and it is freezing, raining, sleeting and snowing with a northwest wind. It's much easier to go use the outhouse than to go inside, remove your muddy boots, muddy and wet coat and overalls just so you can go use the bathroom. It's also a sight more comfortable than copping a squat out behind a bush. Likewise in the spring when everything is muddy it is easier to leave your boots on and use the outhouse rather than struggle to get your muddy boots off and any other muddy clothing just to go inside to use the toilet.

    I actually have two bathrooms inside my house (three if you count down in the basement). The one off the master bedroom is mine. It is the only one I use. I can keep it as filthy as I like (I am a single guy after all) and no one ever has to see it. The one that is accessible to the rest of the house is for guests and females particularly. I've NEVER even used it since the house was built. It is immaculately clean and is properly stocked with good towels, soap and the like. The only problem is that it can get quite dusty if I haven't had the chance to go in there and dust. That is the "presentable" one. You'd be surprised though how many folks that aren't from the country have to go use the outhouse at least once while they're here. Little kids, little boys especially, find the entire concept fascinating and would rather use the outhouse. Once when I had my cousin's kids here they got into a fight over who got to use the outhouse first.
     
  18. MiniMama

    MiniMama Love the Country

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    Now, that's good country common sense, using the outhouse when you're outside doing chores. But, oh, do I remember using it in the wintertime! Good heavens, I hated having the wind whistling through the cracks, and around one's backside! LOL! But, although I don't have one where I am, (unfortunately, I live on only a half-acre, in a subdivision, but I hope to change that in a couple of years!), I would probably put one in, if I had some acreage. The way our economy is going, it's not such a bad idea. One more way to be more self-sufficient.

    I find that hilarious that folks who visit you wind up using your outhouse at least once.:D Is that for emergencies, (too far from the house at the moment), or is that nostalgia involved, for those older folks who remember using an outhouse, when they were growing up? Now, the kids I can understand, especially the boys. Little boys will answer the call of nature in the backyard, in front of God, and everyone! LOL! So, a chance to do things like the "old" people did, (or do), is a chance not to be missed!:D
     
  19. MoonShine

    MoonShine Fire On The Mountain

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    I burn them, too. I even burn the fresh ones from just eaten sweet corn. It works out nice in the summer, when I am canning over a fire out in the field. When I get hungry, I pull some corn and boil it on the fire and when I'm done eating, I throw the cobs into the fire. It seems like they can get the fire good and hot like nothing else can. Burns a good while,too.
     
  20. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    With some older folks it is for nostalgia and with other folks it is just out of curiosity or just to be able to say they've used an outhouse.

    The outhouse I have is getting to be a little decrepit so I'm planning on building a new one in the next couple of years. I'm half wondering if a good wind is going to blow it over while I'm in there sometimes. When I build a new one it's going to be a bit larger just so it is easier to remove a coat or something if needed.