Waterproofing with atlas cement, lime and salt

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by doyle, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. doyle

    doyle New Member

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    Does anyone know the proportions of Atlas cement, lime and, I think, table salt for waterproofing a basement? I heard it years ago but don't remember it.
    Thanks.
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    I posted this and now it doesn't appear so I am posting it again. I apologize if it duplicates.
    The best method that I have seen to waterproof a basement is as follows.
    Treat the walls with the black roll on asaphalt products sold by lowe's and others then apply the rubber membrane material sold for flat roofs and seal all the joints. Carry the rubber from slightly above ground level to below basement floor slab. Place below the basement floor level a perforated drain line in washed stone on both the inside and the outside of the basement walls and gravity flow the drain lines to a point of natural run off. This may seem overkill but if you ever had a wet basement you can appreciate the results and you will forget about the additional expense in the above.
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  3. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    I has been 16 years since I did the outside of my block house, but I think that I used equal parts of cement and lime which was about a half a sack of each and about a half box of plain salt. Not clear why plain salt, but was told to. I mixed it with water and brushed it on. It was like a very thick paint. Seems like I would have to add water to the mixture ocassionaly. I also wet down my wall some before brushing it on to keep it from drying out too fast and where it would bond better. Hope this will be of some help.
     
  4. fernando

    fernando Well-Known Member

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    O.K. So, how did it work? Would you use that method again>
     
  5. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    Well, Ive posted this and I will do so again. Rubber roofing (EPDM) in not compatable with petroleum products. If you wipe a piece of it down with mineral spirits, it will outgas the elasticizers and become brittle. So if you are going to spend a significant amount of money to apply a membrane waterproofing barrier, why use a product, roofing tar, that will destroy it? There are proper adhesives for this application, and several alternatives that are cheaper and/or more effective. If you want a membrane, get a bid to have an elastomeric film professionally applied. If you want something that's dramatically cheaper and 100% effective, use Thoro-seal.
     
  6. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    Can thoroseal be used on interior walls of wet basements? I have a situation that I need to remediate.
     
  7. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely, you mix the dry thoroseal powder with water and their bonding agent, which is a liquid called Acryl 60. It is applied with a whitewash brush. The stuff is amazing. It can be used on concrete water tanks and swimming pools, so a basement wall is no big deal. I have used it on dozens of basements and never had a problem. Their website is thoroproducts.com Good luck.
     
  8. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    If you do a proper job of installing draintile, like Agmantoo has described, there is really no reason to put a waterproofing material on the basement's concrete block. In other words, the block will never get saturated. An alternative to "daylighting" the draintile (ie, perforated PVC pipe) is to have it run to a sump in a corner of the basement.

    IMHO, there is no "magic material" that you can "paint" on the inside, or outside, of concrete block that will effectively, and permanently, seal out water when the basement is below the watertable.
     
  9. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    My home sits on a slight slope and the basement gets wet when unseasonaly heavy rains over a period of days occurs.

    My plan is to put a 4 foot deep french drain in a horseshoe shape around the upper part of the home with each end of the horseshoe ending in a bigger pit on the lower side of the home.

    I would still like to coat the inside wall that faces the upper part of the slope as added insurance.

    Make sense? Thoughts?

    Thanks!
     
  10. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    Well, lets see. There is Thoroseal, UGL Drylock and several other cement based coatings that will do exactly what you claim cannot be done. They will appear to be damp and water absorbent when wetted, but will not allow the passage of water molecules. They will last the life of the structure, have been used sucessfully for decades, and have been proven in applications from basements to bridge maintenance. They are low cost and require little skill to apply. The only significant disadvantages are that they cannot be applied in low temperatures and they will not bridge cracks that develop after application. On thing many people don't realize is that asphault based foundation coatings are nearly worthless for basements. If you dig up a basement that was coated a decade or so previously, in many cases you will notice that the coating is only a faint black stain on the wall. This is because soil microbes actually consume the sealer and slowly make it disappear. Another bogus trend I see in this area is the use of clear silicone sealers for below grade use. I spoke to an engineer from a product supplier about this method. He was very clear that it will not work as it needs to be reapplied on a regular basis.