Used Carders?

Discussion in 'Fiber Arts' started by HendricksHearth, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. HendricksHearth

    HendricksHearth Well-Known Member

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    So I purchased a new Ashford drop spindle yesterday and 2oz of BFL, which I am very excited about. With that said, I am also interested in preparing my own fiber and have been researching the processing methods. I have my own angora rabbits and I would like to blend their fiber with wool in particular. From a more experienced standpoint, would you purchase hand carders or drum carders? I have been told it is so much easier to use the drum carder and create roving from the big batts instead of using rolags off the hand carder. Is this true and is there a place to locate these types of items gently used for less expense?

    Thank you!

    Lauren
     
  2. IowaLez

    IowaLez Glowing in The Sun Supporter

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    Hi,

    Usually drum carders hold their value very well, and finding one at a low price is difficult. You will find many drum carders on Ebay, some new, some used. I don't know of any other site where you can find used ones as easily. For working with angora fiber, you will want one that has finely set teeth on it, rather than one with coarse, to deal with your fine fiber. That usually costs more.

    There is no difference in spinability of fibers carded on hand cards vs drum carders, drum carders are just more convenient because they prepare a larger amount of fiber at a time than hand cards do. When I use my drumcarder, I spin right from the big batt, there is no need to attenuate it into a roving unless you want to.
     

  3. Marchwind

    Marchwind Fiber Arts forum Mod. Supporter

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    Lauren, I will add that in my experience it is easier to blend angora with wool on hand cards. For years I only hand hand cards, then I bought my drum carder, fine toothed with a fur brush ( this is supposed to make it easier to card with finer fibers such as Angora. If you do go with a drum carder sandwich the Angora between the wool and add small amounts at a time. It's so slippery it wants to slide away from the wool.Having said this I still use both my hand cards and drum carder and combs.

    You an try the weavers and spinners house leaning pages for deals on tools. I'll go find the link and be back to post it here for you. Here is a direct link to the page with the carder ads http://www.kbbspin.org/taxonomy/term/3
     
  4. HendricksHearth

    HendricksHearth Well-Known Member

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    Thank you so much for the info and the link- that is very helpful. I will go with hand carders to start, but I will still hope to save up and one day be able to get a nice drum carder. Would an Ashford set of hand carders be okay or do you recommend another?

    Thanks!

    Lauren
     
  5. Marchwind

    Marchwind Fiber Arts forum Mod. Supporter

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    If you will be carding a lot of finer fibers, such as Angora, Merino wool, or others you might want to go with a finer toothed card or maybe even a medium. Stay away from the ones with courser teeth. The ones I have don't have a name on them so I really can't say. I don't know that I have ever used a name brand set of hand cards.
     
  6. Forerunner

    Forerunner Well-Known Member

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  7. rabbitgeek

    rabbitgeek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You rarely find drum carders for sale cheap. People love their carders.

    We got tired of waiting for a good deal on a used drum carder. We bought a Strauch Petite to use for blending angora (rabbit) and sheep wool. We found a good bargain price for a new one with the brush attachment for about $420. That brush attachement is worth the extra money!!!

    It works great. When we sold it I think we got $300 for it. We sold it when we moved to a condo where we can't keep rabbits anymore.

    Anyway, I've done a lot of blending using the large slicker brushes for dog grooming as wool cards.

    Have a good day!
    Franco Rios
     
  8. Marchwind

    Marchwind Fiber Arts forum Mod. Supporter

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    I have the one that is 5th from thew top in your link. I agree with everything Franco aka rabbitgeek said. I don't know anything about the "Kitty" Kitten carders never heard of them. That other one, second from the top, looks hand made and looks very course.
     
  9. Forerunner

    Forerunner Well-Known Member

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    That's the kind of decisive info I like to see.

    Is there ever a downside to having a superfine carder ?
    Does the carder shown look to be offered for a reasonable price ?
     
  10. Marchwind

    Marchwind Fiber Arts forum Mod. Supporter

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    Well mine isn't the "superfine" cloth, I believe mine has fine or medium cloth. I card everything on mine, angora, sheep's wool, mohair, alpaca, bison. Medium to fine cloth would do most things. Make sure you get the brush attachment.
     
  11. rabbitgeek

    rabbitgeek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The Strauch Petite is a "fine" cloth carder. If you take your time, which you always should, you can not only card angora rabbit, but heavier wool and llama fiber.

    If you tried to turn the wool through the carder too fast, it stretches the wool until the fiber snaps. When the fiber snaps, the ends develop little coils like springs and you get all these little curlies in the carded wool.

    Going slower allows the fibers to separate from each other without breaking, making for a smoother batt.

    A little practice, patience, and attention to the process will reaps rewards in an improved outcome.

    Have a good day!
     
  12. Marchwind

    Marchwind Fiber Arts forum Mod. Supporter

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    Yep, yep what Franco says. Also remember to fluff your fibers before putting them in the carder. Never over load the carder, put small amounts in a bit at a time. If you bend the teeth you can't bend them back or replace them unless you replace the whole piece of cloth and that's really expensive.
     
  13. rabbitgeek

    rabbitgeek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, fluff the fiber! Dog rakes. I forgot to mention dog rakes which are good for fluffing the fibers before putting them in the carder. Or at least tease them by pulling apart with your hands.

    Have a good day!