Use a potato to remove Rooster spurs ?!?!!??

Discussion in 'Poultry' started by Miz Mary, Feb 18, 2010.

  1. Miz Mary

    Miz Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here's the site ......

    http://www.fowlvisions.com/?p=39

    Has anyone tried this ?!?! I wonder..... we DO have a dremel ....but that means I ( ME ) have to hold the mean rooster !!!
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Chicken and dumplings works better, though potato and chicken soup is good too.
     

  3. Natalie Rose

    Natalie Rose Well-Known Member

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    How the heck did someone figure out that holding a hot potato against a rooster's spur would help remove it?
    I am all for the old ways, but even then how did some accidentally discover that?
    I would try it just for the heck of it, plus it sounds the least traumatic for everyone.
    I admit that when I get a rooster that starts going all Jackie Chan on me I just get rid of him rather than deal with his spurs or trying to rehabilitate him.
    However I do have two lovely roosters that have some impressive spurs on them, perhaps its time to bake some potatoes.
     
  4. wofarm

    wofarm Well-Known Member

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    Seems like an awful lot of trouble to go thru when a spur saw, or fine tooth hacksaw blade, will do the trick in about, oh, 2 minutes! or less
     
  5. nc_mtn

    nc_mtn Well-Known Member

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    I'm thinking someone got in a hurry and started cooking before cleaning? :shrug:
     
  6. xoxoGOATSxoxo

    xoxoGOATSxoxo when in doubt, mumble.

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    :rotfl:
     
  7. Callieslamb

    Callieslamb Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking this same thing as I was reading this thread.....There are some strange people out there.

    "Here, sonny. You don't have anything else to do, so while I toss the salad - go hold this hot potato on that old rooster's spurs and see what happens. Whadda looking at me like that for? Go on, be a good boy now. "
     
  8. egg head

    egg head Well-Known Member

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    I have read the strombergs book on sexing chicks and the man that wrote it just knows so much about chickens. It was like his life. We order from them and Ideal. The potato was probably just another one of his experiments, I have pulled off a couple experiments that well lets say didn't pan out.
     
  9. TwoAcresAndAGoat

    TwoAcresAndAGoat Well-Known Member

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    If you CUT the spur just trim the end there is blood at the base near the leg.

    If you want to remove the spur altogether grab the spur with a pair of pliers and twist it off. There will be a red spongy cone core left. Do Not remove the core. It may bleed a drop or two of blood if this bothers you put some blood stop on it. The spur will grow back.
     
  10. Falls-Acre

    Falls-Acre Well-Known Member

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    I once had a rooster with dangerously long spurs, I treated them like I would horns on a goat... cut them off near the base (maybe 1/2 inch from the leg) and then cauterized with a bud iron. It grew back much more slowly and was never as sharp as initially.
     
  11. roolover

    roolover It's Chicken Time! Supporter

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    Thanks for the cauterization idea, Falls-Acre. I've got a bunch of year-old roosters with dangerously long spurs, and have been cutting them as we move birds around to breeding pens. Having them grow back more slowly will be appreciated around here.