Underpinning for Camper

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Diana/KY, Jun 10, 2007.

  1. Diana/KY

    Diana/KY Well-Known Member

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    Hello, I need some ideas for underpinning on a camper. What do people use for this and how do they attach it to the camper? My son lives in this camper on our property and we're trying to find ways to make it more of a home. Do you think putting underpinning on it will help to conserve heat in the winter?
    Also, if it's possible to put underpinning on a camper, how to you go about getting around the trailer hitch? If anyone has done this or has any ideas, I'd appreciate your suggestions. Thank you, Diane
     
  2. CJ

    CJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In RV parks, where you have to keep up "appearances", you often see canvas (awning type material) skirts that can be custom made for the camper. They are attached via snaps which are installed on the camper body. Not cheap!

    Some people stack hay or straw bales around the camper. Bad idea, it's heaven for mice and they'll soon move into the camper and start destroying insulation and more. The added moisture is even more of a problem.

    Styrofoam panels work, attached like mobile home skirting. Not pretty, but efficient. You could pull the belly pan of the RV and see if there is room to add more insulation (we did that with ours)

    Wind is the worst. If you can block it, you'll help alot.

    The Wandering Quilter's Life in a Box!
     

  3. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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  4. Diana/KY

    Diana/KY Well-Known Member

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    CJ and BFF, thank you for the suggestions and the link. I never thought about "skirting". I put that in Google search and got a whole lot more pages with ideas. I actually found a website with a company that specializes in camper skirting. Nice, but VERY expensive. For our size camper, 26', it would cost 1100.00 for their skirting. Guess we'll just have to make our own. Thanks again.
     
  5. AmericanStand

    AmericanStand Well-Known Member

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    Sheet metal roofing or vinyl siding attached to treated 2x4 stakes or frame.
     
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  6. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The last one I did for My Wifes GD a few months ago I used 5 V tin because it was a older Camper(but looked good) so I did not mind a few screw holes at the bottom of the sides plus I already had the 5 V tin pieces. I dug a trench straight down beside the camper about 6" deep all the way around---cut the tin to keep it straight/neat with the bottom down in this trench. Because of the ground being soft it took less than a hour. The 2 20's girls that are living in it said it looked good and Cozy!! The several before that I done I used regular vinyl underpinning like a lot of Mobile Homes use.

    I know it helps---it blocks the wind from going under the camper----I lived in a camper on the back of my farm next to the lake for 6 years--off grid---by choice. I Loved it.
     
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  7. Bellyman

    Bellyman Well-Known Member

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    A very basic 2x2 framework and some of this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Foamular...uare-Edge-Insulating-Sheathing-20WE/207179253 (or something similar) would be way less than $1100.

    If it's temporary, no need to be pretty. If longer term or if in a place where looks count, finishing off the outside with siding of some kind would probably be a lot nicer to look at.

    Campsites are usually rather uneven in nature and you probably would have every piece being a custom fit. Not a big deal if you're doing it yourself.
     
  8. AmericanStand

    AmericanStand Well-Known Member

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    If the ground is soft (or you can soak it) you can pull a variation on fireman's trick. Most places that sell metal roofing have a sheet cutter.
    Cut those sheets 4 to 6 inches longer than the ground distance and simply push them down into the ground.
    It's even handier if they let you borrow the sheet cutter for an hour or two.
     
  9. Fishindude

    Fishindude Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Underpinning is the wrong word. I think you are talking about "skirting", which would be sheeting to close off the gap between the bottom of camper and the ground. Shutting off the cool air to that area will definitely help keep it warmer. Any number of ways you can accomplish this. Drive thru a trailer park and look at how they do it.
     
  10. MoonRiver

    MoonRiver SM Entrepreneuraholic Supporter

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    I put gym mat squares on the floor of my RV for a recent trip. I really liked it as the floor never felt cold and I also liked the feel of it. That might be too expensive for a larger RV, but you could put carpet down.
     
  11. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    While what you said is correct, the thread is 10 years old and the OP hasn't posted since 2009.
     
  12. Bellyman

    Bellyman Well-Known Member

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    Oops... Didn't realize. Sorry.

    Hope the OP finally figured it out. Would have been neat if they had come back and posted some pictures showing how they skirted the thing.


     
  13. jwal10

    jwal10 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I did one permanent. I put down heavy plastic sheet on the ground. Got the trailer set level. Made a frame to fit with treated 2"x along the ground, let the trailer down, level on the frames so I didn't fasten the frames to trailer. Used 3/8" T-111 that I glued 2" rigid foam to, installed with long screws through the foam to the frames. Kept it nice warm and dry under the trailer....James
     
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  14. Bellyman

    Bellyman Well-Known Member

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    Also, when you have things closed off nicely like what you did, even just a little heat underneath can keep the temperature under there warm enough that the comfort level inside the RV will go up pretty dramatically when it's below freezing outside.