? sow for summer grazing

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by gwithrow, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. gwithrow

    gwithrow Well-Known Member

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    we have an area that we are clearing for new pasture.... there is old/native grass that is sparse and we have rolled out round bales over where the burn piles were this spring and let the cows in there to fertilize and walk in what they don't eat...however I would like to sow something that will help hold the soil and give perhaps some grazing this summer...then sow fescue in the fall....

    I could use some suggestions as to what to sow in there soon....I know we will get fescue from the hay and whatever else is in there, but the cows need to put pressure on it as well....we want to keep the blackberries down....and add manure as well...

    once we sow new fescue we can keep the cows off it until it gets established...and/or sow rye in the fall and let the native grasses come on their own...I would like to discourage the bad stuff and keep the soil covered as well....
     
  2. gwithrow

    gwithrow Well-Known Member

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    I forgot to mention that this is an area with many stumps so the cows will need to do most of the 'mowing'.....
     

  3. Ironbutt

    Ironbutt Well-Known Member

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    I am using a blend of clover, teff grass & red river crab grass for summer grazing on new ground. This will allow the ground to mellow some. Then this fall I'm going back with brassica's, red clover, rye & oats. Then next spring native grass,bermuda grass & some crab grass & clover. I'm in coastal NC Fescue doesnot do well for me.
     
  4. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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  5. gwithrow

    gwithrow Well-Known Member

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    excellent, thank you for that link....and it confirms what we want to do in that back 10 acres....not disturb the soil...actually since the stumps are there it is easier to not try to turn anything over...first we have covered the soil with old hay....trompled by the cows and manure added....then we will broadcast, since we do not have a drill,....we will probably have to eradicate the awful yellow crownbeard that flourished there last year...hopefully we can get a jump on it before it gets too tall....

    there is a variety of native stuff....and to that we want to add or incorporate...clovers...and other seasonal things...so late or not, the clover will go in as soon as the rain stops...then shortly I suppose we will do the summer items...I have a little left over red river crab grass...can't afford anymore but what I have will be put down there...we are early for that, as well as the summer things...but it is not too early to plan....the cows are doing their part even today in the rain...walking all over what we have unrolled...

    they are looking forward to grass, which is slow to get going this year...but soon.....

    what are the best sources for seed?
     
  6. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Millet. It will grow good during the warmer/summer months.
     
  7. gwithrow

    gwithrow Well-Known Member

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    is there one kind of millet that is better than another? and where is the best place to get the seed?
     
  8. ramiller5675

    ramiller5675 Well-Known Member

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    For forage or hay, you are going to probably want to grow pearl millet. I've grown both millet and sorghum-sudangrass (or haygrazer) as a double crop after wheat harvest. I've never broadcast it into a pasture, so I can't tell you if that will work.

    I put down about 30-45 lbs. of N per acre and drilled it into the wheat stubble. When it gets enough moisture, sorghum-sudangrass will outgrow millet. If it gets hot and dry, the millet will die out faster than the sorghum-sudangrass.

    I just buy my seed from the local co-op or feed store, and it usually has to be ordered. Even if your local feed store can't get seed for you, they should be able to point you in the right direction.

    I have heard that millet likes sandier soils and sorghum-sudangrass likes soils with more clay, if that helps any.
     
  9. Allen W

    Allen W Well-Known Member

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    Cow peas. If it is time to plant green beans it's time to plant your summer grazing crops.