Siding a barn

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Strange Bear, Feb 15, 2007.

  1. Strange Bear

    Strange Bear Well-Known Member

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    I am thinking that I will need to reside my barn this year. What suggestions do y'all have for this fun and expensive project. Would you use wood again or side with other siding? What costs should I expect?
    Thanks
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here in my area, can't really find good wood any more.

    Steel is the way to go.

    But, steel doesn't like livestock rubbing up against it.

    And if you don't leave the old wood under, or otherwise vapor barrier it, it can sweat a lot in some climates.

    Your location & the type of livestock & if they get to touch the siding will probably make a difference.

    --->Paul
     

  3. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm using rough sawn siding milled from trees I cut. My brother has a band mill, so it's just labor and a little gas/oil for me to get it. He charges $150 per thousand board feet to cut for the public if the customers will assist by off bearing and stacking the lumber. That might be an option if you have some trees that would make lumber/siding.

    Rambler's suggestion to use metal would be great (and better than wood probably) if you can find a deal on it. Metal is awfully high here right now, but it might be a better value where you are. Good luck.
     
  4. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    If you put steel over the existing wood, and that existing wood is rotten, it will keep on rotting and the barn goes away.

    Pulling the old siding and treating the timbers in suspect areas with a penetrating epoxy will keep it around for the future.
    Once rot starts it doesn't like to quit.
     
  5. Michael W. Smith

    Michael W. Smith Well-Known Member

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    Putting steel on the sides of a barn? Yuck!!!!!! It's not a barn to me anymore!!!!

    Our barn had needed resided several years ago and as far as I know, it was still the original wood that had been put on the sides when it was built. When we were having timber cut from our property, I made a deal with them, that they would cut enough hemlock trees to reside my barn. They cut the trees down, hauled them off to be cut into boards, and I "paid" for the sawing by taking the sawing price off what I would get for the timber. If memory serves me, the sawing bill was around $1600.00.

    Once they brought the hemlock boards back, I stacked them outside with spacers between rows of boards so they could dry. After drying for over a year, I had the local Amish guys come and reside the worst 2 sides of my barn. In no time at all, the boards turned the gray color as the other 2 sides and all is well. Sometime in the next 5 years, I plan on residing the other 2 sides and should have enough boards to do it.

    1" thick hemlock boards is what you need. Use "aged" boards that have dried so when you put them up, you can nail the boards side by side without very much of a gap, and they won't "shrink" leaving large gaps between boards.

    While I did "cheat" and put steel on the roof of the barn, I would never dream of putting steel on the sides - especially of an old barn as it ruins the look of it.
     
  6. Tiffin

    Tiffin Well-Known Member

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    We decided to go with red steel on the east and west side of our barn because it was completely destroyed due to severe storm winds. We took off any old rotted siding, put up Amish wood perling and then covered with the steel. The rest of the barn we were able to replace a few boards and paint. Also had the roof replaced with steel. I am happy with it; it doesn't leak anymore. We get many compliments.
     
  7. Tiffin

    Tiffin Well-Known Member

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  8. just_sawing

    just_sawing Haney Family Sawmill

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    Okay
    I'll go in my information mode that customers ask oftem. First all old rot has to come off. Check all seal beams those are also called plates. If the seal plate are bad they have to be replaced. The wood in the past is post oak. Do not use pine poplar ect. Now check the lowest banding (In a earlier post they were called pearling but here pearling is what is under the roof) The lower banding is what takes the most abuse. I suggest from poplar at 50 cents to sassafras at 80 cents. Pm me if I can assist
     
  9. Bret

    Bret Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You have just received the Right As Rain Ranch Purple Ribon Award for your barn improvement. Very well done.

    Bret
     
  10. Tiffin

    Tiffin Well-Known Member

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    Thank you, Bret. I never heard of the award but I'll take it. The back side is due for some help this coming summer. But, this east end, front, west and roof was a must do or we lose the barn.
     
  11. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I could not remember where to find the pic, but I remember your barn now from the "barn pic" thread. I think it shows that metal can make a great looking barn, but again, since I have access to "cheap sawmilling", I'm going with wood. You have a great looking barn.
     
  12. Bret

    Bret Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We call our place Right As Rain Ranch. When we see someones project that looks like very nice we say that we need to give them the Right As Rain Rach Purple Ribbon Award--as in the Grand Champion Award. We say it alot.

    Bret