Running a well pump on solar...

Discussion in 'Alternative Energy' started by seedspreader, Jun 16, 2006.

  1. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    I would assume wind would be best, but our well isn't deep in this area, figure 100 feet or less. What would be required to run a pump for say an hour or two a day during a power outage? The panels would be dedicated just to the pump.
     
  2. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    110 or 220 volt? And starting amp draw.

    BooBoo
     

  3. Aintlifegrand

    Aintlifegrand Well-Known Member

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    Is there a solar pump for a well that you can buy instead of the electrical pumps?
     
  4. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Yep,run on a single panel.Pricey tho......

    http://divpower.com/store_pattypump.htm

    BooBoo
     
  5. Aintlifegrand

    Aintlifegrand Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. We are finally getting the well in and that was what I wanted to have installed. Any company you think better than another to purchase the pump. Where should I begin looking rather than just googling?
     
  6. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Google away,so many different choices,but pricey,my oh my,they are pricey.
    Maybe Solar Gary has some innovative links?

    BooBoo
     
  7. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    I wanted one also but I sure dont want to spend 1k plus on one. I just wanted a shallow well one for 35 feet or so.
     
  8. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Shurflo's 9300 series can be found for well under $1000, usually around $700. I picked one up new off of ebay for $450, but haven't hooked it up yet.
     
  9. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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  10. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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  11. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    ZYG.....Stop to think what the weather conditions could/would be during a grid power outage. You might get thirsty waiting for a sunny day.
    And if you dedicate some PV to -Just- that pump,..then you could be wasteing a hugh amount of potential PV energy.

    Grundfos has some very good *soft start* 120vac pumps---around $580. Worth the bucks so as not to have to use a BIG inverter just for the start surge. They say a 1200 watt inverter will power these pumps.

    Grundfos also has the SQFlex series that can run on PV (a lot of it) an inverter, a battery, a generator, or the grid. And yes the price is $1500.

    And of course its easy to pump water with the wind........when the wind is blowing.

    Theres a lot more options for pumping water *today* than just a short time ago.
     
  12. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Well (no pun intended), I was talking about batteries and inverter also, I suppose I was just figuring that was assumed. Sorry.
     
  13. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    Yup, A *hybrid* system (I think) is the only way to go.

    PV---Wind---Batterys---Inverter
     
  14. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Gas generator $480, ac motor/pump $250, gasoline about $2.71/gal , pipes, don't remember :shrug: After checking out the prices of alternatively powered well motors/pumps, I went with conventional. Some of them are not only pricey but a little "iffy" with starting surges and less than optimum water quality.
     
  15. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    So with a typical well pump, how many panels would you need?
     
  16. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Just curious. I've got to drill a househouled well anyway, on grid electricity. Probably 160 - 200 feet, maybe less if I can actually get a driller to go shallow.

    Anyway, just curious, is there a way I could slip down to the bottom of the same hole a small (I mean really small) solar pump to bring up a couple of hundred gallons a day to help keep water in a stock-sized pond that I use as a water cache? Solar would be great because the cache pond could use the added water exactly when it was sunny, hot, and dry - not night or cloudy winter.
     
  17. SolarGary

    SolarGary Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    You might find a way to do it here:
    http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/WaterPumping/waterpumping.htm

    Gary
     
  18. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    ZYG, thats a loaded question.
    Just what do you define as a *typical* well pump ... ?

    cab, "really small"---"couple hundred gallons"........not likely.
    thats wishfull thinking.
     
  19. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I know little about it, am reading this thread to learn.

    You may wish to look at western USA livestock publications - they have various ads & suppliers for solar water supplies for livestock watering, from windmill pumps to solar pannels & pumps.

    Not just homesteaders are doing this, look outside the box. :)

    However, it is not a cheap thing - a low torq motor to pump water that high & solar panels to run it won't be a bargin bin item for sure.

    --->Paul
     
  20. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    In my thinking if you are going to have dedicated solar you might as well let her run whenever the sun is shining. So instead of 1-2 hours a day during a power outage, why not 6-12 hours a day? By running more continuosly the pump will not have to be as big, though it will have to be reliable or get replaced more regularly. You will eliminate batteries and charging and discharging losses and heavy startup currents. Perhaps you might still have a battery just to serve as a voltage regulator of some sort. You would need some sort of a cistern, and perhaps another pump to get from there to the house and up to pressure if that's what you want.

    Here are some pumps:
    http://www.enviro-equipment.com/products/proactive_12VDC_pumps.html