Portable Milking Stanchion (pic)

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by topside1, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

    Messages:
    4,822
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Location:
    Monterey, Tennessee
    The front two bars pivot, bolts hold it in position while you milk. This new photo ought to give you perspective...Not a hard build, even sold a few....Topside

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Cheryl aka JM

    Cheryl aka JM Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,111
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    North Alabama
    I've seen your pictures before~ and I'm seriously thinking about building one Topside.....Just ran pregnancy tests on my bottle babies from two years ago and they ARE pregnant!! But bull has only been with them for 5 months so I've got some time still.

    I probably can't justify the expense with all the other expenses here lately....
    but if you were to build one for sale....
    what would it sell for?
     

  3. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

    Messages:
    4,822
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Location:
    Monterey, Tennessee
    Cheryl I'll PM you later this week..In case you were wondering it will fit in the back of a fullsize pickup....Topside
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2011
  4. barefootflowers

    barefootflowers Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    163
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    Topside- Thanks for the new pic. I didn't get the "pivot" part before. I showed my husband and it looks like we/he has a new project for this weekend. I feel like I'm the one having the baby :)
     
  5. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    12,042
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2006
    Location:
    Northern Michigan (U.P.)
    I like the simple design. I have an idea on the moveable 2x4s. Instead of bolting and unbolting each time, if you used those closer together bolts as stops and you could drop a piece of wood between the verticle treated 4x4 and the moveable 2x4s. You could keep it in place with a wider board nailed to the top of it or figure a way to hinge them.

    Actually, you could do it with just one 2x4 moving. My old barn had some home built stancions that had just one board moving. there was a notched board attached to the moving board, so when it was close together, that notched board dropped into a slot and kept the cow contained during milking. Then just lift the notched board and it opens up.
     
  6. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

    Messages:
    4,822
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Location:
    Monterey, Tennessee
    The stand in this photo is not complete, it's just an example. The bolts act as pins, not bolts. You don't complete and make adjustments until your cow is in place...Anyway enjoy the photo.
     
  7. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

    Messages:
    3,236
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2005
    Location:
    Kansas
    But it doesn't protect from kicking. Is there a way to build it that might protect from kicking while milking?
     
  8. katy

    katy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    687
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Location:
    NW MO
    Once upon a time, they had what could be called "cuffs" to stop kicking for serious problems.

    No idea whether they are still around and available............
     
  9. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

    Messages:
    4,822
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Location:
    Monterey, Tennessee
    You sit on the outside of the platform and milk, not on the platform. Plus if you had a crazy kicker maybe you should have left with an empty trailer or worked with the little heifer throughout it's lifetime. Buying a dairy cow can be tricky so don't buy them just because they look cute...Topside
     
  10. uarelovedbygod

    uarelovedbygod Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    243
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2003
    Location:
    Ky
    I need to build a stanchion soon for our pregnant jersey. Like your picture. What is the dimension of the platform, and what did you build the floor surface out of?

    Thanks!

    --Chris
     
  11. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

    Messages:
    4,822
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Location:
    Monterey, Tennessee
    Chris the floor surface is 90" long by 44" wide. Base is three 4 x 4's, the third 4 x4 goes down the center of the deck. Planking is rough cut hickory...Topside
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2011
  12. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,349
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2003
    Location:
    Missouri
    I built and used on very similar to your basic setup. Mine differed mainly in that one of the upright 2"X4"s was fixed semi-permanently to the upper and lower crossbars with bolts, I drilled extra holes 4" apart so I could adjust the width for different sized cows.

    The other upright 2"X4" pivoted on a bolt through the bottom cross pieces as your does, but I attached one end of a hinge to the inside of the 4"X4" frame post and the other side of the hinge to a "2X6" block. After the cows head was in the stanchion the "2X4" pivoting upright is closed on her neck and the block, which is sized to hold the upright vertical, comes down behind it on top of the upper cross pieces, locking the cows head in place.

    The handy aspect of this setup is there are no bolts to deal with unless the stanchion is being adjusted for cow size, simply raise the upright drop the block in place to restrain the cow and reverse the procedure to free the cow.

    This isn't complicated and is much easier to make than it sounds.
     
  13. Menglish

    Menglish Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    535
    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Location:
    Michigan
    My dad built one for my sister of a very similar design. He did use upright posts at the back corners and ran a 2X6 above and put a tin roof over it to protect from rain. Also built a feed trough on the front to feed grain/sweet feed while milking. Worked great on a Dexter and now my sister's Jersey.
     
  14. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,349
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2003
    Location:
    Missouri
    I read this again and realized it wasn't very clear, so here is a, not to scale, sketch, it was made of oak from a local sawmill. Sorry, about the poor sketch, it's obvious I'm not a draftsman.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2011
  15. Cheryl aka JM

    Cheryl aka JM Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,111
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    North Alabama
    Back in March when Topside first posted this I considered buying one of these from him. He quoted me a great price, but I declined because I was having a hard time walking and was not sure I would be able to keep my animals. I didn't know why my hip hurt. Long story short~ turned out my hip was broken (yes it's possible to walk around on a broken hip and not know why your hip hurts...I wouldn't believe it either if I hadn't lived through it) Well after getting some pins in my hip and 7 weeks in a wheelchair....I FEEL GREAT! MUCH better than I did before! BUT~ I'm also having to pinch more pennies. (Hip surgery is expensive even with insurance). So I am going to build myself one of these stanchions. I've got lots of ideas how to adjust it to fit my needs~ I want skids and a roof on it. I have more questions though

    IS 6 foot X 3 foot floor space large enough? The wood dimensions will work out more easily at 6'X3' but I don't want to find myself a bit short when it comes time to load Bessie in it...

    And I will want to use it when I need to train Bossy to milk...Bossy is not as easy going as Bessie and I have a mighty fear of being kicked. (We are pretty sure a cow kicking me is what caused the broken hip before). So I know I want horizontal bars alond the side to control potential kicking action~ but I also want to use it to allow foster calves to nurse from the girls....so how many horizontal bars should I use and how high should I put them to afford the most kick protection and still allow my arms and/or a calfs head to fit through?

    Edit to add~ I'm thinking of using 2X4 pressure treated for pretty much the whole thing including the kick bars if that helps you see what I'm imagining.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2011
  16. Cheryl aka JM

    Cheryl aka JM Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,111
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    North Alabama
    OK~ well I'm not done but I got it started. The 2X4X6' wasn't available so I went with the 2X4X8' which changed the dimensions I had to work with some. The stanchion is roughed out completely at 7'X3' floor space~ the roof with be 8'X4', the front of the stanchion standing at 6'6" the back at 6'. The kick bar is at 18" high. Hopefully these dimensions will work as it is too late to change them. I hope to finish is tomorrow if nothing else comes up and then I'll put Bessie in it and take some pictures for critique.
     
  17. Cheryl aka JM

    Cheryl aka JM Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,111
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    North Alabama
  18. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

    Messages:
    4,822
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Location:
    Monterey, Tennessee
    Cheryl, you are one motivated, creative gal...."Bravo Zulu" as we used to say. Simply meaning, be proud of your work...Topside
     
  19. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

    Messages:
    4,822
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Location:
    Monterey, Tennessee
    I especially like the flower pots hanging to the right and rear of your milking stanchion...nice touch, you must milk from the left side....Topside
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2011
  20. Cheryl aka JM

    Cheryl aka JM Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,111
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    North Alabama
    LOL! It does look like those are hanging from the stanchion! They are actually hanging from the porch, the stanchion is in front of the porch. The goat stand is on the porch as well, and the eventual placement of the cow stanchion Im thinking is right alongside the porch where the large bush is now. That way the overhang roof from the porch will help add weather protection and the electric will be easier to access. It's in front of the porch right now because it is WAY heavy ~I'll need to lift is with the boom on the tractor and get a couple people to help me position it correctly after I rip out that bush~ so I need help to do that part~

    Thanks for the compliments I got the entire idea from modifications I wanted to make to your milk stanchion but buying yours just didn't work out...and as it worked out thats the most work I've put into a project in a while and it was much more a challenge than I anticipated. I'm pretty well whooped