Poison Hemlock

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Phillip, May 8, 2010.

  1. Phillip

    Phillip Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone had experience with this plant?

    It is growing in many ditches around here (south central TN). I recently found out what it was ... I had always thought it was Queen Ann's Lace (wild carrot). Quite a few of the plants are already topping 6' tall.

    Link to Wikipedia, photo on the right.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conium
     
  2. glenn amolenaar

    glenn amolenaar Well-Known Member

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    Phillip,
    Get it sprayed or it will take over, it is very aggressive and in a short time will be in lawn, garden and any other place you dont want it. Here April and early May are the best time to spray it, spraying is against my way but is the only thing I have found to slow it down.
    Glenn
     

  3. ronbre

    ronbre Brenda Groth Supporter

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    i should pull fairly easily before it goes to seed
     
  4. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Very invasive and should be controlled. I have seen it around here and it can ruin a pasture if one allows it to.
     
  5. SFM in KY

    SFM in KY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Poisonous to livestock. I'd had no experience with it until I lived at Pryor, MT where it was uncontrolled in some places along Pryor Creek. I lost one mare to it for sure ... another mare recovered, but had respiratory problems as a result and actually died in her early teens from it.

    Some animals develop an addiction to it and will search for it, even if there isn't much of it, even if they have adequate grass available, though most animals will avoid it.
     
  6. Phillip

    Phillip Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I've pulled or cut all of it within sight of my residence.

    It pulls up along with the root real easy. I've read its a biannual so I just got to keep it from going to seed...
     
  7. COSunflower

    COSunflower Country Girl Supporter

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    My BIL gets alot of it by his irrigation ditches. He takes a shovel with him every day when he checks the ditches and just digs or pulls it out. Constant vigilance has kept it at bay.
     
  8. Oldcountryboy

    Oldcountryboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Very poisonous. I've read that this is what the native americans made their poison darts with. Supposedly if you have a scratch on your hand and happen to be handling it and get some residue from the plant on your scratch, you can die from it. It's that poisonous.
     
  9. beaglebiz

    beaglebiz Wasza polska matka

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    didnt Socrates die from hemlock??
     
  10. JHinCA

    JHinCA Well-Known Member

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    We are constantly working on controlling it here. Goats and sheep seem to be able to eat it without harm, but I have heard it is very poisonous to cattle and know people who have seen horses die of it. It is allelopathic (sp?), which means that other plants won't grow near it so you definitieyl don't want it in your pasture even if you have goats. We do not spray it, just pull it or dig it up. There is still quite a bit but we are making progress. I have seen it 12 feet tall with stalks that look like you could use them for firewood!

    I have gotten juice in a scratch and am still here, but have heard stories of children dying from just putting a stem in their mouths.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2010
  11. suitcase_sally

    suitcase_sally Well-Known Member Supporter

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  12. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The reading I've done on it said that children have been poisoned by using the green hollow stems as blow guns. We did that but we used the dried up ones and got lucky.

    The hemlock I had on my farm was a biannual. I would just put on gloves and pull it out. Then throw it in a pond where the goats couldn't get it.
     
  13. Patt

    Patt Well-Known Member

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    Weird our cows ate it with relish and no ill effects......we never had much of it here though.
     
  14. bloogrssgrl

    bloogrssgrl Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps the relish is the antidote to the poison.
     
  15. Patt

    Patt Well-Known Member

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  16. Oldcountryboy

    Oldcountryboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've never seen a cow eat relish, but I guess anything is possible. I like relish on my hotdogs, I wonder what else the cows eat it on?
     
  17. kyweaver

    kyweaver Well-Known Member

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    Round here there are several huge stands of it.
    It really freaks people out once you tell them what it is.
     
  18. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Was reading on the internet that a woman died from eating it. Apparently people are mistaking it for carrot tops and other various herbs and gathering it in then mixing it in their salads. It does look somewhat like carrot tops but you have to know what you're looking at before you eat it.
     
  19. JHinCA

    JHinCA Well-Known Member

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    It smells so bad to me I can't imagine anyone eating it.