Need Advice on Removing Metal Barn Siding

Discussion in 'Homestead Construction' started by badlander, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. badlander

    badlander Well-Known Member

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    After looking at the thread about the pole barn house (one of which we are currently living in) I figured that this was the place to post this question.

    Our back porch overhang roof looks very much like LaMoncha's without the upright supports. The previous owners were Amish and before deciding to sell had started to turn the east end of the porch (poured slab concrete with hydrant and drain present) into a summer kitchen of sort where his wife could do laundry and cook and be out of the weather. The enclosure is unfinished, with the exterior walls the same metal barn siding as the house.

    We have considered finishing the enclosure into a screen porch but after looking at it from all angles have decided that it is probably cheaper to just take the enclosure out and have an open porch with a fantastic view of the woods. The enclosure does not add anything positive to the back of the house.

    So that is the spring project is to tear down the two walls and remove the one really nice window (trust me, it looks strange to have a window on a three walled open porch) and recycle the 2X4s and siding into other ongoing projects.

    My question is HOW do you remove nails from barn siding (regular washered type barn siding nails) with out tearing the begeebers out of the metal? I'm sure some body here has tackled the problem and can provide the answer. Is there a special tool that can be used? Do you use a regular pry bar, hammer or what?

    Thanks in advance.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  2. T-Bone 369

    T-Bone 369 Well-Known Member

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    We disassembled a couple of small pole barns a few years back and found the easiest way was not to pull the nails (ring shanks) but to clip the heads off. We used a couple pairs of large end cut pliers (handles about 16" long) which made pretty short work of them.
     
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  3. badlander

    badlander Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info. We have a small set - 6". I'll look to pick up a pair of 16inchers at Ace.
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Can you just remove whole sections of wall with the framing in place? Then reuse the sections as complete walls?
     
  5. badlander

    badlander Well-Known Member

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    I'm thinking probably no. We are planning to use the 2X4s and sheet metal for different projects. The sheet metal is going to go to closing in a wall on the barn. The barn is three walled and needs to have the fourth wall closed in to get better insurance rates from the Farm Bureau. We plan to replace the crooked hedge posts with regular square posts and use the siding there.

    We have approximately 8X24 feet of siding and wall to take down. If you look closely at the video you can see the open south wall of the barn in the background.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbiA9BECel0&feature=youtu.be

    Sorry about the hyperlink but I couldn't get the youtube tag to work.

    Another question. We have a plan to put an overhang porch similar to the one "LaMoncha" has on his house which means we are going to have to loosen the roofing in order to slide another panel under it. Can you use the same method of cutting the head of the nail off and if you do, how do you then pull the shank without damaging the roofing?
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2013
  6. T-Bone 369

    T-Bone 369 Well-Known Member

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    On the porch I'd clip the head on the bottom row to allow you to slightly lift the edge then cut the shaft with a sawzall.
     
  7. badlander

    badlander Well-Known Member

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    But will you be able to reuse the existing hole for the new nail and if not, how do you deal with the old nail hole?

    Sorry to sound so dumb but this is new territory for DH and I and we want to do it right so we don't have leaks. We are looking at about 60 feet of new 6 foot overhang porch.
     
  8. mickm

    mickm proud hillbilly

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    One small word of advice, be careful! You might be suprised at how much support the tin gives to the structure. Keep an eye out, and possibly add bracing, as you deconstruct!

    Folks are right about clipping the nail heads off, but keep in mind, you may want to pull nails for projects using the studs.

    Just a few more things to consider!
     
  9. badlander

    badlander Well-Known Member

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    I'm not too worried about the support issue. The existing porch has no supports at this time, it is just a large overhang. We are considering adding supports just to secure downspouts. This picture was taken of the porch right after we took possession of the farm. The small out building and tank are now gone but you can see the two walls I am referring to to the far left on the porch.
     
  10. littlebitfarm

    littlebitfarm Scotties rule! Supporter

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  11. badlander

    badlander Well-Known Member

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    Whow I can see why your friend calls it a Swedish Knuckle Knocker! Have you used one? And if you have how did it treat the material around it? Pulling the nails would be nice but denting or marring the siding would be a real bummer.

    The item details says that the smaller one is easier on the surrounding material but would it be strong enough to pull the washer-ed shank nails?
     
  12. T-Bone 369

    T-Bone 369 Well-Known Member

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    As long as the nail holes hit the new framing you should not have any trouble re-using the nail holes. I would use screws with the rubber washer for the new work - they hold better IMHO and can easily be taken out in the future if you want. Places where the holes are not used put a dab of silicone in them.
     
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  13. littlebitfarm

    littlebitfarm Scotties rule! Supporter

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    We used it pulling old nails out of old wood, they were flush with the surface. So there was a little divit where the nail was. I would think with a rubber washer under the nail you could get away from the divit. When you go to rock it and pull the nail out, shove a 1 x underneath it to protect the metal.

    Kathie
     
  14. dkhern

    dkhern Well-Known Member

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    clip nail heads or use puller or use 2 claw hammer set claws of one on nail and hit hammer face w/other hammer to drive claws onto nail. with puller or hammers use plywood to pry on. will protect metal. as said use screws for new construction. silacone will plug holes