Natural Preventatives and Remedies for Rabbit Illnesses

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by MaggieJ, Oct 11, 2007.

  1. vikav

    vikav Well-Known Member

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    I'm taking an herbal class, and have been reading on all kinds of remedies, and came across some that sound promising.

    I have an old timey Russian rabbit health book. They used to keep the buns on solid floors, most oldtimers probably still do. I imagine, coccidia was a concern. The book says as a preventative, to run a 0.01% iodine solution through the drinking water of pregnant does and does with young litters. I can look up how exactly they prepare the solution, but they are talking about iodine powder, which probably means pure iodine, w/o any additives. Is there such thing to be found in the US? Also, I know Vanodine has drinking solution recommendations. I wonder, if this could be used instead. I'm usually completely anti-chemical of any kind. Have to read up on iodine, as right now to me it sounds harmless enough if done correctly. Also, if iodine kills bacteria, can it upset the rabbit's intestinal flora? Anybody here using Vanodine or knows if it's ok to use in rabbits' drinking water?

    The next one is a fact I've read in one of the herbal books, that lamb's quarters plant is a powerful anthelmintic for livestock. I wonder, if it wouldn't also be true for rabbits' worms. It is safe for the buns, right? Anyone feeding this to their rabbits?
     
  2. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Re: Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album) a quick google search indicates that you are perfectly correct about its possibilities as a wormer. Purslane (Portulaca oleoracea) is another common weed that sounds promising in this regard. I feed both of these to my rabbits, but feed lamb's quarters only when young, before blossoming. We need to dig a little deeper for more information, but feeding plants like these may be more beneficial than we thought.

    http://www.holisticbird.org/pages/dgarden.htm

    Regarding iodine and Vanodine, I think Beaniemom may know. I recall that she uses Vanodine a lot in her rabbitry. I'll PM her.
     

  3. vikav

    vikav Well-Known Member

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    Is there a reason you feed it young, before it blossoms?
    Thanks, I'd love to hear what she has to say.
     
  4. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It is used as a human food in its young stages but not later... and I have noticed that the rabbits reject it as it gets older. In spring it is very useful because it starts early when greens are a bit limited; but later on the mallows, sow thistle, prickly lettuce etc. fill the gap. So I drop out the ones that may accumulate nitrates in their leaves: red-root pigweed, curly dock etc. I am not sure if lamb's quarters is one of these nitrate accumulators or not, but I treat it as such, taking my cue from the bunnies.
     
  5. vikav

    vikav Well-Known Member

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    Apparently, shepherd's purse can be used to stop or prevent hemorrhage post parturition. Some places say it has to be fresh, as some believe dried herb loses its potency. It works similarly to oxytocin, so shouldn't be taken during pregnancy, only following parturition. Here is the link to its uses in humans, and as far as I understand, animal uses are similar, just feed them the plant.
     
  6. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Excellent information, Vikav! :goodjob: I've bookmarked that website.
     
  7. nixcissmo

    nixcissmo New Member

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  8. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I came across this website while trying to find information on plants to increase milk production. The information is quite detailed and obviously the breeder has given the matter considerable research and thought. There is a lot of information on other topics as well, which I have not yet read, but I'm hoping it will be just as useful and well-thought-out.

    http://spangangoras.blogspot.com/2008/06/herbs-for-prego-moms.html
     
  9. Surfing_Bunny

    Surfing_Bunny Member

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    Blue Cohosh works in the same ways as Shepard's Purse. It can be used if doe has a hard time birthing or kit gets stuck. It will dialate the birth canal.
    Same thing, not something to give while pregnant, until doe is due. It will induce labor. Also it will help in healing once kits are born.
     
  10. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That's good to know, Surfing Bunny. Thanks! Is Blue Cohosh something one can gather and if so can you tell us a bit more about its habitat?
     
  11. Astrid

    Astrid Well-Known Member

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    Can anyone tell me what causes ear canker? I had some rabbits that we bought for breeding/eating and after a couple of months their ears were disgusting. We ended up butchering the whole bunch. I would like to start over again, but I am concerned about what caused this and how I can avoid it going forward. Is there any kind of remedy for this if it happens again?
     
  12. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ear canker is caused by ear mites and results in disgusting looking crusted and scabby ears. It is quite easy to treat with either mineral or vegetable oil. Warm the oil slightly, just to body heat and squirt or drop it into the rabbit's ears. Wear old clothes, because the rabbit is going to shake its head vigorously! This causes the oil to be distributed through the ear and it smothers the mites. You may have to repeat the treatment a few times over a couple of weeks if the infestation is heavy. You may need to treat rabbits in neighbouring cages as well. There is no need to remove the crusted material... It will go away on its own as the mite infestation is killed off.

    There is certainly no need to butcher rabbits for such an easily treated malady.
     
  13. Astrid

    Astrid Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info Maggie. We did try the oil method. We even bought some commercial ear medication and it didn't help. It was only after a couple months of almost daily oiling that we gave up. I want to make sure to prevent it in the future.
     
  14. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I can't remember a case where the oil didn't work, but there are medications that will certainly kill the mites. I'm not familiar with them myself since we seldom have problems with ear mites here, but I think if you use the search button in the menu bar to search for ear mites (few people here refer to it as canker) you will find reference to it. Except for the oil, however, I know of no natural methods of controlling the mites.
     
  15. berryrabbit

    berryrabbit New Member

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    Maggie; have been reading all this for a couple of days and need some ideas. I bought feed for my rabbits that has turned out to be really and am working with the company on that issue. It stressed my rabbits and now I have lost must of my herd to pasturilla and and trying herbs, does any one have any ideas please. Berryrabbit
     
  16. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Berryrabbit, I'm sorry to hear you are having problems. Many rabbits have a dormant form of pasteurella that surfaces when the rabbits are under stress. I assume the bad feed brought this about in your herd.

    Unfortunately, I know of no good treatment for pasteurella, natural or otherwise. Some rabbits do survive, of course, but they are still carriers even though they may not show symptoms.

    Natural remedies work very well for small ailments and you have no doubt seen the discussions about treating GI disturbances, nest box eye, diarrhea etc. in the preceding threads. You can certainly try feeding lots of good grass hay, tonic weeds like plantain and dandelion, berry leaves, willow etc. if they are available. I don't know how much winter you get and what if anything you may have to work with. These things will contribute to your rabbits' good health, but they are not cure-alls.

    I think you should post about your problem in more detail in the main part of the forum. That way people with experience in treating pasteurella can make suggestions. My rabbits have been very healthy and for that reason I am not skilled in treating illnesses. People who have been through something similar to your sad experience will be better able to give you good advice.
     
  17. volchitsa

    volchitsa Well-Known Member

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    Neem (Azadirachta indica) is great. I'm not sure if this plant is found readily fresh (other than tropics and humid climates), but it really is wonderful. We have a tree on our farm and every other day we feed a sprig (leaves, bark, fruit, seeds, flowers, etc- it all works) of it to rabbits we aren't trying to breed. It is works as an anthelmintic, antiviral/virucidal, antibacterial, antifungal,anti-mutagenic, and anti-carcinogenic. It also helps boost the immune system and is packed with nutrients. The only problem (or not, if this suits you) is that in large doses it can work as somewhat of a contraceptive in both bucks and does. It can also act as an abortive for very early stages of pregnancy. I only feed to young buns, and ones that aren't breeding or are pregnant. Although super bitter, the buns really love it. I also take it in tea when I'm sick or need a boost.
     
  18. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    Where do I get the grape seed extract to use in treating fur mites???? My Angoras just keep getting them. HELP!!!
     
  19. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That should be grapefruit seed extract, not grape seed extract. Ann Mary posted a correction further down the thread. You should be able to get it from a good health food store or online.
     
  20. bellissima

    bellissima New Member

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    How do you give the ACV water and the GSE water: mixed together or first one for a certain amount of days and then the other for another number of days...? Anyone knows?