Lost key 93 ford ranger

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Daryll in NW FLA, May 31, 2012.

  1. Daryll in NW FLA

    Daryll in NW FLA Well-Known Member

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    Like an idiot I lost the only keys to a 1993 ford ranger I bought to fix up. Anyone know if a Ford dealer can make a new set of keys from the vin number? Nearest dealer to me is 45 miles away and doesn't seem to be answering the phone. Thanks.
     
  2. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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  3. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes they can, as long as the ignition switch hasn't been changed. I think you can get them straight from Ford (bypassing the dealer) but not real sure.
     
  4. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You didn't toss your keys in your tool box did you?
     
  5. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Yes they can. My nearest dealer made me a key at no charge. He had a manual key cutter. I had never seen a key cutter that required no electricity.
     
  6. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    I dont know when Ford went to the coded keys on them, if they did, assume they probably did. Been several years ago, but friend bought a '91 at auction. Repo with no keys. We bought a new lock at Autoboned for $20 or somthing. There is little locking pin that keeps cylinder in place. If I remember its back of steering wheel on bottom side of steering column. Beat it back in with pin punch and hammer. Pulled out old lock, slipped in new one and it started right up.

    Now if they have went to the kind with the security chip on the key then get ready to fork over some big bucks from dealer. There is no bigger scam than those security chip ignitions. I personally would convert to an aftermarket MegaSquirt computer system eliminating all that factory security stuff, before I paid dealer or locksmith big bucks for stupid key.
     
  7. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    93 doesn't have chipped keys.
     
  8. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Good, then probably a new lock is easiest and cheapest way. Unless you have a very friendly dealer/locksmith buddy. Nobody does anything for $20 anymore unless its a desperate crack whore and I doubt she would get the Ranger going.
     
  9. mekasmom

    mekasmom Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can just take off the steering wheel and pop out the tumbler. Then you could replace the tumbler for about thirty dollars or just start it with a a screwdriver. We have done that with a few old cars in the past before they started chipping everything. Back when all the kids were small we were too poor to always get a lock smith or buy a new tumbler, so we had a few cars that we drove with nose pliers or a screw driver depending on which tool worked to turn them on.
     
  10. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    As I told him, you dont take off the steering wheel on a Ranger. I think might have to remove the plastic clam shell housing around the steering column, but thats trivial. Then punch that little pin in with pin punch and hammer and the key lock pops right out. Now on GM I think you had to remove the steering wheel, but been too long since I had a GM.
     
  11. firefighter1129

    firefighter1129 Active Member

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    The dealer probably can't help you. I am a locksmith and deal with this type of thing on a daily basis. Ford only goes back 10 years on their key codes, after that they purge their system. You might get lucky and find a code written in the owners manual, or if you know the original dealer that it was purchased from they might have the codes on file a little longer.

    The easiest thing to do is to call a locksmith. It should be less than about $100 depending on where you live. If you change just the ignition, that doesn't help with the door locks and you WILL lock yourself out again in the future because you still don't have that key.

    Hope this helps! I'll be happy to answer any technical questions if you need anything else..... Good luck!
     
  12. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Autoboned sells door locks too, lot cheaper than $100, not big deal to change out. Though by that age, locking doors on a Ranger probably not big deal. If you are stupid enough to leave anything valuable in sight, thieves just break window and grab it. Otherwise doubt they will steal truck, just dont leave key in ignition to prevent joyrider kids. They are the only people stealing such a vehicle and then only if you make it super easy and convenient for them.

    One thing if you do go to bother of replacing all locks or keys, keep spare set on nail in kitchen cupboard or someplace you know where they are. Maybe in a bottle duct taped to inside of frame rail on Ranger. Again nobody is going to go to lot trouble looking for spare keys on some old beater pickup in order to steal it. Now if you have a pristine 1953 Corvette with 20k miles, maybe want to take a little more care. Or just leave it parked at my place, I will protect it.... I'll even occasionally drive it for you just to keep battery charged of course...
     
  13. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If it's like the 91 wagons you just remove the housing from the steering column to change the ignition switch. Not real difficult but takes a little time. I know the cars of that year still had different keys for the locks and ignition. Don't know if the trucks had different keys or not.
     
  14. Daryll in NW FLA

    Daryll in NW FLA Well-Known Member

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    Planning on heading to town tomorrow for new ignition- wife comes in with the keys in her hand! Found them in the passenger door pocket. Going to town tomorrow to get an extra set of keys made! Thanks for all the help!!
     
  15. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    I'm nominating this post for the Funniest Post Of The Month Award.

    Very funny, but also true!
     
  16. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    Your advice here is spot on...but, FWIW:

    A friend of mine had an '89 F-150, which even though the truck was solid and ran great, it was an old beater.

    Just a few weeks ago, a crack head stole the truck from a mechanic's lot, where my friend had it parked for a muffler repair.

    The crackhead must have used a slim jim to get the door opened, and then beat the column with a sledge until it broke, and then hot wired the truck.

    The crackhead thief used the truck in a bank robbery, and then joy-rode it, 4x4 style, and left it abandoned in a farm field.

    It cost my friend about $350 in impound fees and towing, plus the truck, which was nearly trashed after the crackhead was done.
     
  17. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You need to buy her some flowers or something special for finding those keys.
     
  18. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    If this is likely in your neighborhood, there are tricks. Sticking kill switch in a secreted place under dash. And using it. Or some oldies like GI's did in WWII with the oft absconded with jeeps. They would either swap out two of the wires on distributor, or they would remove distributor cap and take rotor with them, or use a lead pencil and draw lines between the posts on underside of distributor cap so ignition would misfire constantly and jeep would be undrivable.

    Do you really think the crackhead wouldnt just bust drivers window to gain access through a locked door? Driving a vehicle with window "down" not going to raise any red flags. Now a busted out windshield would probably get you stopped. The secreted kill switch probably about as effective against this kind of person as the chipped key thing. 1989 F150s were computerized vehicles so not going to be easiest thing to wire around the ignition.

    And if truck totalled, why did the guy pay $350 to get it back? Thats about scrap value isnt it? I'd just write it off and find another vehicle that needed less restorative work. Though really cops should hold crook responsible for impound and towing fees, not the victim. But the victim has money, the thief does not.....
     
  19. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    HJ,

    Car theft is actually uncommon around here. Even though I've lived here all my life, I'm not sure that I've ever met anyone that has had a car stolen, except for a guy in town that drove a brand new Suburban to Chicago, and the truck got stolen there.

    The crackhead actually lives in another very rural town, and police believe he was in our town looking for a car to steal.

    Not sure why my friend paid the $350 in impound fees...the police wouldn't let him near the truck before paying, and even investigated him to see if he was in on the bank robbery. From a distance, the truck looked fine. I think the small town cops also scarred him into paying the fees, saying that unpaid impound and storage fees would add up, and he would be held liable for all costs.

    I think he was also under duress, without a vehicle, and with hard nosed small town cops breathing down his neck, I am guessing that he just paid the $350.

    Insurance did pay on the truck, which they deemed totaled to the tune of $1250, I think...so he wasn't out too much.