lawn mower gas tank leak

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Columbia,SC., May 4, 2006.

  1. Columbia,SC.

    Columbia,SC. Thats MR. Redneck to you

    Messages:
    831
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    on my moms riding lawn mower the gas tank has a leak. I have not seen it yet but she and my dad say it is near a seam. it is a plastic/vinal/molded type tank. any ideas on how to patch this? I know the gas is a problem with anything sticking to it. I was wondering about JB weld, or the epoxy stick you cut and mix like play do. I know those will work with steel but what about plastics with gas involved?
    Any ideas are very welcomed.. if none then they have to bite the bullet and buy a new tank.
    Thanks in advance,Columbia,SC
     
  2. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    660
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    Location:
    Effingham, Illinois 5b
    Boy I don't know about plastic but I've patched steel tanks with JB Weld. Another thing that works on steel even with gas coming out a hair line crack is Seals All I've used it on cars and motorcycles. I've seen Seals All at Wal-Mart it was in the glue section of automotive and is in a Yellow and Red tube if I remember correctly. :cowboy:
     

  3. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,093
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Plastic tanks are near impossible to repair. I have patched plastic battery cases using low watt soldering iron. Not sure that would be smart with gas vapors around.

    New tanks tend to be expensive. If you have a float carburetor and suspect you do, you can mount a non-original gastank, just fabricate some brackets and have bottom of it higher than carburetor, then run a piece of fuel line.
     
  4. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,843
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2002
    Location:
    central idaho republic
    yu could try a lawm mower wrecking yard.... if one aint avbailavbe then it is a good opportunity to go into business, not much to them and most of the dead ones are not dead..... usually a gas line, or something else pretty simple to fix and the neat thing is you dont need a full blown auto shop to do it all in...

    and canibalizing parts off one to go to one that needs fixed takes very little time too once you get the numbers figgered out.

    I agree that new tanks are spendy, but if the mower isnt in bad shape they can be worth getting as opposed to buying a whole new mower.....

    if the leak is in the seam it is probably a goner as even jb weld willl raise up off the seam and allow it to run farther, scuff it up really good before applying.... trouble is until you put fuel back in over the mark you wont know if its really sealed and at $3 per gallon its a psendy test to see if the leak is tolerable and fixed and rely on it as opposed to getting a whole new tank too... terrible to have to weigh options against a federal reserve accounting unit denomination eh?

    William
     
  5. Columbia,SC.

    Columbia,SC. Thats MR. Redneck to you

    Messages:
    831
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    I still have not seen the leak but I think it may more than can be repaired, I would LOVE to McGiver this thing back for my mom if at all possible. nut I am pretty sure of the outcome.
    Thanks for the help and any new ideas are always welcomed!
    What if I cleaned the outside real well and scuffed the tank with some snad paper- shallow cuts or shallow drilled holes for the JB weld to get a grip on? Just a thought.
    Thanks again!
    Columbia,SC
     
  6. Red Devil TN

    Red Devil TN Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    266
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Location:
    TN
    How good are you with fiberglass and resin? ;)
     
  7. Nature_Lover

    Nature_Lover Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    596
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    My first thought was Testors airplane glue.
    The liquid kind that melts the plastic.
    First melt the seam back together, then patch it with similar plastic.
    I've used this for repairing my glasses, cassette tapes, cracked steering wheels, you name it.
    If you do get it fixed, check the rest of the tank and make sure it's supported sufficiently. It might be leaking from vibrations pulling it apart because a strap or mount has come loose. Then again, it might be because the gas cap is defective or the wrong one, and it doesn't let in air to replace used gas, creating a vacuum in the wrong kind of gas tank.
    This should be an easy fix, since it isn't pressurized, and it shouldn't create too much of a vacuum.
    Let us know how you get it fixed.
     
  8. Gideon

    Gideon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    460
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2005
    Try this-it works on small holes in weedeaters/blowers/etc.--drain the gasoline completely and let air dry(lid off)for a day. Take some weedeater string and start it burning and drip it onto the hole/cut. The stuff will seal most anything plastic. Do not let it drip on your skin or touch it until well cooled or it will cook you badly. To digress, you can use a small blower(hair dryer) to dry the tank out faster. Remember that gasoline is very flamable so do not use it near open flames/sparks. Hope it works well for you. About fiberglassing--I just put two layers on my old Jeep tank. A new tank was well over $150. Used about $40 worth of resin/sheeting and have a much better tank than I could buy. Gideon