Ideas to get rid of Blight?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Backfourty,MI., Oct 4, 2009.

  1. Backfourty,MI.

    Backfourty,MI. Katie Supporter

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    A Local farmer told me to put lime on my garden & plow it up this fall to get rid of blight, has anyone else heard this? I guess the lime will supposedly kill it?

    I also heard not to plow up your garden until spring & I guess in this state the thinking is the freeze will kill it?

    Has anyone ever tried these things & do they work or do you have any other ideas?

    It was bad for gardens this year with the weather & then everyone getting blight here.
     
  2. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Blight is a fairly broad term.
    What crop is effected?
    If you grow potatoes, don't put lime on.
    A ph test will tell you how much, if any, lime you need.
    In your area the ground will freeze a lot deeper than what the plow turns.
    What type of soil do you have? Is it sandy, clay, muck?
     

  3. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Some crops don't get enough calcium liming soil can help but much is dependent on watwer also. Soil test will tell you if lime is needed. I don't think what you're trying to accomplish woulkd have to do with killing anything.
     
  4. country_wife

    country_wife Evil Poptart

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    If you mean the 'late blight' that so many of us suffered this year, here's some info:

    Late blight is caused by the fungus Phytophthora infestans. Unlike most pathogenic fungi, the late blight fungus cannot survive in soil or dead plant debris. For an epidemic to begin in any one area, the fungus must survive the winter in potato tubers (culls, volunteers), be reintroduced on seed potatoes or tomato transplants, or live spores must blow in with rainstorms.

    More info available at the link: http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3102.html
     
  5. Callieslamb

    Callieslamb Well-Known Member

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    Lime doesn't kill blight that I know of. But a well-balanced soil will produce healthier plants that in turn supposedly resist diseases better. Lime is added to the garden in the fall because it takes a while for it to start to work. Apply in the fall so it is available to your plants in the spring. You really shouldn't just haphazardly put lime on your garden. have a soil test taken and see how much lime you need to use first. You might not need any - depending on your soil type. Any conversation about lime in a garden, no matter what you are growing, should start with asking what your soil pH is to begin with.

    I till in the fall to get rid of weeds and prepare the garden for spring. That is when I add lime that needs to be tilled into the soil. After tilling, I sow annual rye on the entire garden. I let that grow until the winter kills it. It is either tilled in in spring or I plant right through the dead grass. Tilling in the fall means that I don't HAVE to till in the spring. If we have a very wet spring, this is an advantage in getting things planted on time.
     
  6. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i read the linked page. not to be argumentative, but it states that late blight cannot survive in the soil or on dead tissue. it also states to destroy all volunteer plants. am i to infer that the blight will survive in the seeds of tomatoes?
     
  7. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    No it will not.

    Martin
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Lime will reduce blossom end rot in tomatoes.
     
  9. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    maybe i am cursed with an eye for conflicting details, but if the fungus will not survive in the soil or on dead plant tissue, why bother to cull volunteer plants?
     
  10. country_wife

    country_wife Evil Poptart

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    Actually, that's a valid question. I googled that and am seeing conflicting information, mostly about whether or not the organism can survive on dead plant material. I'm playing it safe and tearing out all of my dead tomato plants, as well as any volunteers that sprout next year.

    There is, however, no cure for late blight, so the OP would still not need to lime their garden.
     
  11. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    That would apply only to parts of the country which have a nearly frost-free winter. Infected living volunteers from the previous season would then affect those plants of the next season.

    The reason why late blight was such a big deal this year was that it affected the Midwest and New England where it normally has not been a problem for some years. (Example is Wisconsin which had last seen it in 2002.) It's in the South every year. By tracking the spread of infection, it's thought that our strain started out in Texas and leapfrogged from garden to garden via the winds. It was reported about 30 miles SW of me a full week before it hit here. Even then, there is enough of a gap between our community gardens and my home garden to not have a single fruit or plant affected.

    Martin
     
  12. Backfourty,MI.

    Backfourty,MI. Katie Supporter

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    Thanks everyone, I will have a soil test first before applying any lime.

    I didn't get any blossom end rot on the tomatoes but the blight that I got in my tomatoe plants this year was worse than I've ever had before.
    I always rotate where I plant them & make sure to pull all my garden plants, etc. in the fall before tilling or plowing it up.
    This year though after the plants started turning brown the green tomatoes started rotting when still green. I noticed it first around the stem.
     
  13. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    That indeed was the late blight. Next year, keep a close eye on the news. If and when late blight is reported anywhere south or west of you, decide if you've already had enough tomatoes or need all you have. If enough, do nothing. If not enough, begin spraying with the fungicide Daconil. That's the only one that's effective against late blight on tomatoes. And once you see the price of Daconil, you'll probably accept whatever comes!

    Martin
     
  14. Backfourty,MI.

    Backfourty,MI. Katie Supporter

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    Thanks Martin, I am guessing it's pretty exspensive from the way you make that sound but I wrote down the fungicide Daconil & will check it out next year if I need to.
    So other than removing the plants, etc. & plowing up the garden this year I guess there's really nothing else I can do?
    I am taking a soil sample in Wednesday to our conservation district since I have to go in there anyways & have never had my soil tested for anything. My garden has always done very well so I don't want to complain because we always get enough of most everything I grow & enough still to share.