ideas for a cheap cattle guard?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by cab, Jun 21, 2007.

  1. cab

    cab Well-Known Member

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    All the cattle guards I have seen require a poured concrete bed, then an expensive welded pipe grate. Has anyone figured out a cheaper way to make a cattle guard? Thanks....
     
  2. Sand Flat Bob

    Sand Flat Bob north central Texas

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    When I was in High School, long ago, we got 9 foot Bridge railroad ties that the Railroad no longer wanted. We used them for the base and across for the grid. We ran loaded grain trucks over them and never broke one. The cattle never walked them and got out. Other animals, such as goats, would probably go across like they weren't even there. We got the ties free for keeping up the fence on the Santa Fe railroad that ran a mile though our farm.

    Bob
     

  3. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ................What some folks have done is build Or have built a lighter weight CG that can withstand a 1 ton truck and cattle trailer with a gross weight of less than about 30,000 pounds . This is predicated upon the fact that the CG will only have to support the weight of maybe two axles for a short period of time so the driver can't park on the gate ! The Other part of this solution will be the installation of a 16 foot swinging gate on either side of the CG for Very Heavy trucks too allow INgress\Egress so they don't drive over the CG . , fordy... :)
     
  4. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    My dad has one of felled trees about, I dunno, 4" diameter each? They rest on some pretty big logs, maybe 12"? I never really looked closely. But it works. He drives trucks and stuff over it.
     
  5. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Maybe or maybe not work, but how about digging up the required area and installing concrete blocks set on edge? If one broke it would not be a major job to replace it. Cost, about 1 dollar a block.

    You may have to dig out any accumulation from mud carrying tires occasionally.
     
  6. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .............In a way this is a good excuse for purchasing a welder and teaching yourself a new skill . Then , once you've mastered the art of "burning" alittle rod you'll understand why welders wear those funny looking little , all cotton caps and charge $40 per hour , LOL . Actually , I always enjoyed(and still do) bending metal into your "own" image . I'm assuming ,here , of course , that you're physically capable of welding , if not then I apologize . , fordy... :)
     
  7. pancho

    pancho Well-Known Member

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    I have seen cattle guards put in on asphalt roads. They just painted them on. Worked most of the time.
     
  8. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    In Paraguay, they were made from wood. Usually 2X or 3X on edge, with enough supports under them to make them sturdy enough to drive over. I think some treated 2X8 on edge with supports at the ends, and in the middle, would work.
     
  9. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    Problem with the 2x8's is putting them close enough together to be strong and still far enough apart for the cows etc to get their feet and leg into should they try to cross. sis