idea for planting fruit and nut trees ???

Discussion in 'Home Gardens, Market Gardens, and Commercial Crops' started by chaossmurf, Apr 20, 2017 at 9:44 PM.

  1. chaossmurf

    chaossmurf Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    220
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Location:
    citrus county , florida zone 9a
    i was wanting to scatter a lot of wood chips around the trees on my dream homestead & am wondering if my idea would work for many many years ---

    my idea is to make mounds several feet tall2-3 ? and the base of the hills be in the 10-15 ft range in shallow cone shape & plant the trees in the top/center ---then every year scatter woodchips from commercial tree companies around these fruit & nut trees in my food forest ---for constant mulching of the chips for many years into the future

    what im wondering really is ---does it sound like a great idea ?? or a good idea ?? or even a bad idea ?? and does anyone have a better long term solution for planting fruit & nut trees they can share thatd be ,somewhat organic ---basically no chemicals and pesticides is my goal :)
     
  2. geo in mi

    geo in mi Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,949
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    First, find out from your county extension agent what fruit and nut trees, other than citrus, will grow there in Zone 9a....And follow common practice for that area.

    geo
     
    chaossmurf likes this.

  3. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    12,128
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2006
    Location:
    Northern Michigan (U.P.)
    Should we assume this is a wet area? Why the mounds? Decomposing wood chips use up much of the nitrogen in the soil. I love the goal of growing fruits and nuts without chemicals in an area of year around bugs and plant diseases. Some fruit varieties are less prone to plant diseases and a few resist some pests. But even organic fruits and nuts are grown with a long list of chemicals.
     
    chaossmurf likes this.
  4. geo in mi

    geo in mi Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,949
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Now, somebody's going to ask you for that list.......

    geo
     
  5. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

    Messages:
    5,977
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Location:
    Wyoming
    Using woodchips you'll be inviting disease to your trees. The pathogeneses that decompose the chips will not know the difference between them and the roots/wood of your trees and attack them. Better to use straw/hay or some other compostable that is not wood bases.

    WWW
     
    ShannonR likes this.
  6. Terri

    Terri Singletree Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,332
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Kansas
    f the young trees are only planted wood chips to support them, wouldn't the first stiff breeze blow them over?

    (Wonders Terri, who lives in tornado alley.)

    If your area Is not windy in the spring, never mind.
     
    ShannonR likes this.
  7. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

    Messages:
    640
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Location:
    State of Jefferson
    I did something similar with mounding around my trees... I have horrible quality soil at my homestead, and was losing all the trees we planted so someone gave me the advice to NOT dig a hole in the ground to plant. He said to dig a trench about 3 ft out all the way around from the intended planting spot, plop the tree roots right onto the ground in the middle of the circle then use the dirt that was dug from around the planting spot to cover up the trees. That way the roots grow into the topsoil...
    I took this a step further and started mounding manure around the trees, and twice a year mulch with straw or old nasty hay.
    Three years later there are now mounds between 10 inches and 3 feet deep around all of the trees, with grass growing under them, no more trees have died, and they are starting to produce.

    IDK if woodchips would work, I think that WWW has some sage advice on this subject... 0325171451.jpg
     
    COSunflower and Terri like this.
  8. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

    Messages:
    640
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Location:
    State of Jefferson
    Surprisingly, I haven't had any issues. A couple of the trees are being trained to stand straight with baling twine, but even the ones that aren't haven't blown over in the wind. Maybe they will when they get bigger, though!
     
  9. ldc

    ldc Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,402
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Location:
    S. Louisiana
    Here in Louisiana we can't use woodchips around fruit and nut trees, not just because of diseases but due to critters that nest in chips and then proceed to eat the bark off young trees...also the chips are home to myriad insects.
     
    ShannonR likes this.
  10. chaossmurf

    chaossmurf Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    220
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Location:
    citrus county , florida zone 9a
    hey terri I meant mounds of dirf --- then chips around the hill
     
  11. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    12,128
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2006
    Location:
    Northern Michigan (U.P.)
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2017 at 7:20 AM
  12. geo in mi

    geo in mi Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,949
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
  13. Terri

    Terri Singletree Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,332
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Kansas
    Yes, that WOULD work better, LOL!
     
  14. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    488
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2014
    Location:
    Madison County NW Arkansas
    I like the idea of mulching, but like others have said it attracts pests.... i lost better than 30 trees to meadow voles a couple winters back. by the time i realized it and dealt with them it was too late..they're easy to control if your aware you need to.

    check with your extension office they'll point you in the right direction.
     
    COSunflower and geo in mi like this.