How to kill thorn trees

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Crowbar, Jan 8, 2010.

  1. Crowbar

    Crowbar Well-Known Member

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    I have a lot of thorn trees of all sizes on some property we just bought. Can someone tell me how is the best and cheapest way to kill them and get rid of them. I know if I just cut them down they will just grow back! How in the world do you handle them? (other than just carefully)
     
  2. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Cut with a chainsaw. Spray the remaining stumps with brush killer.
     

  3. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Or let them leaf out and spray with roundup.
     
  4. Crowbar

    Crowbar Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering what brush killer to use ? I have so many of these trees that roundup would break the bank! These tree have thorns from bottom to the top .How in the world do you move them with out spreading thorns all over and causing flat tires?
     
  5. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

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    Here in N. TX we have honey locust, trees w/5" 'spikes'! All over the trunk & branches. Some large ones we've left, just don't go too close! Small ones we cut then mow/clip a few times after that. We don't use roundup.

    Also have prickly ash-not quite as bad as the locust but pretty stickery. After they mature, the thorns are not as bad. But if saplings are in the way, we cut then too, mow & clip afterwards.

    Patty
     
  6. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Actually glysophate (generic roundup) is pretty cheap now, and a little goes a long way. Go to an ag store and get the undiluted form and then mix with water.
     
  7. Crowbar

    Crowbar Well-Known Member

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    That is what we have the locust with the 5inc. spikes. some are next to some trees we would like to save .some of these are very large trees I don't want to leave any of them to go to seed. some are in the woods. some are in fence lines.I really need some good ideas. thanks for any and all ideas .
     
  8. Toads tool

    Toads tool Well-Known Member

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    Go to the local Farm and home and look for some Tordon RTU.
    Cut tree down and spray the growth ring of the stump.
    Right at $20 a bottle.
     
  9. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I thought that I heard Round-up has a generic competitor now so the price is dropping by 50%.

    When I was trapping coyotes in NM one winter my tires developed slow leaks. It was from the thorns from some kind of tree.
     
  10. sirquack

    sirquack Well-Known Member

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    Crowbar, I am having exactly the same issue. I bought a place in Southern Iowa and it has about 10% of the trees are mature Honey Locust. I have tried cutting and burning out the stumps, which seems to have worked, so far anyway. But it is so time consuming. I am piling up the stumps on one piece of the property and I may try a small fire pit this year to burn them. I don't want any of them big ol' spikes putting out times on my truck or motorcycle.
    I will definitely be trying the generic round up method this year. Too much work to try to do anything else at this point.

    Ron:grit:
     
  11. Crowbar

    Crowbar Well-Known Member

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    Boy thanks all for the great ideas. I'm writing them down so I can check the prices.I'm also going to ask the local road commissioner for any ideas.
     
  12. Allen W

    Allen W Well-Known Member

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    Cut and spray the stumps with herbicide such as Tordon, Remedy, round up straight or mixed 50/50 with water, or any herbicide labeled for stump treatment. Remedy can be used as a basil treatment, 2,4-D will kill them too especially the smaller trees.

    The thorns on a honey locust will burn very rapidly when they get hot enough, right up a standing tree, right up a standing tree and pretty quick too. Found that out one night lighting a back fire before burning a pasture.
     
  13. ksfarmer

    ksfarmer Retired farmer-rancher

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  14. Allen W

    Allen W Well-Known Member

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    Here is a sight you can look up ag chemical labels, if you have the name or manufacture of what you want to look up.http://www.cdms.net/Home.aspx
     
  15. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can spray the whole tree, killing it, then cut it down and burn. It will take a lot of spray and the spray will drift all over.

    Or, you can cut the bushes down and apply weed/ brush killer to the freshly cut trunk/stem. Very little killer needed, little overspray. Burn the brush.

    Roundup is good or any of the generic brands. 24d is good, too. Read the labels and mix properrly.
     
  16. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas Guest

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    When you cut and treat a stump the entire stump doesn't even need treated with chemical, only the outer portion. This site tells that only the outer 2-3 inches of a large tree stump needs treatment. http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/eb1551/eb1551.html

    A 3 inch paint roller in a can of chemical would be ideal in my opinion provided you make sure not to spill it.

    The application does need to be done promptly after the tree is cut.
     
  17. Cheribelle

    Cheribelle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Offer them as "cut your own" firewood, then treat the stumps.
     
  18. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

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    Stumps will decompose naturally if you drill holes in them & fill w/liq or dry molasses.

    patty
     
  19. spiritrider

    spiritrider Well-Known Member

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    You could manage them as natural fence. Or cut into posts if right size.
     
  20. am1too

    am1too Well-Known Member

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    My solution was to put this green tire sealant in my tires and air 'em up. You can get it in a variety of sizes up to a gallon. It works in ag tires. The sizes are sold for bicycle to ag size tires. I have an abundance of sand plum 2 to 3 inch thorns. I now brush hog them with no more flats. Found in farm supply, auto parts, and sundry discount stores.