How to Dehorn a Yearling Jersey Heifer?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Organic Cowgirl, Jan 9, 2009.

  1. Organic Cowgirl

    Organic Cowgirl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2007
    Location:
    SE Texas
    I'm interested in calling about this heifer, but ONLY if she can be dehorned. (Hmmm, I hadn't realized Jerseys were anything but polled.

    http://houston.craigslist.org/grd/986847135.html

    Anyway, just interested...I still haven't found a milk cow that suits us. It's been a bit on the back burner, but I haven't forgotten about it.

    Thanks!
     
  2. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,246
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    Its a vet job at that age and any large animal vet can do it for you. Our vet would only charge around $5-$10 for a dehorning. Be prepared for lots of blood but recovery is quick and it doesn't seem to bother them for long. I would reccomend dehorning her before breeding her and letting her recover before introducing any new cattle to the situation.
    Most Jerseys are horned.
     

  3. Allen W

    Allen W Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,762
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    NW OK
    Vet can do it for you. I've took horns off a lot bigger then that.
     
  4. Organic Cowgirl

    Organic Cowgirl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2007
    Location:
    SE Texas
    Thanks guys. I'll give a call about her.

    I just called our vet and it's $70 to dehorn her. :( I called two others, one didn't do it and the last vet say between $80-100. I got really excited by the $5-10. I mean, the quoted price wouldn't stop me from buying her, but eh...it's a huge difference.
     
  5. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,246
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    Yeah.....I really like my vet!
     
  6. menollyrj

    menollyrj Joy Supporter

    Messages:
    2,569
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Location:
    Middle TN
    You might check w/others in your area who have cattle. We keep a dehorning tool and a neighbor has the "heavy duty" ones for larger horns. Maybe someone in your area might be willing to help you w/the job...

    -Joy
     
  7. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,246
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    I disbudd our calves but I wouldn't try a dehorning on such a mature and valuable animal. The vet goes in deep exposing the sinus cavities and there are arteries to be closed. Makes me nervous just thinking about it.
     
  8. Oakshire_Farm

    Oakshire_Farm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    931
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver Island, British Columbia, CANADA
    I just had my 5 year old Jersey dehorned :( I loved her horns but I have kids now and she is a little to friendly and likes to get a little pushy when she is in heat. So I had them removed. The vet came out knocked her right out with rompin (sp?) and then gave her a shot of ladocane (sp?) to freeze the area, he then used a wire saw to cut them off and then used a dehorning iron to stop the tiny bit of bleeding that there was. She was back up and back to her normal self within the hour. She did have holes in her head where the horns came off. We kept her in the barn when ever it was raining, but it has now been close to 4 months and you cannot tell that there was ever horns there! My total bill was just under $100, that is up in canada

    I kept the horns and an having a couple of hunting knives made for my husband out of them!
     
  9. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

    Messages:
    4,822
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2005
    Location:
    Monterey, Tennessee
    Welcome to the forum Oakshire,,,I bet those knives are priceless...neat idea....Topside
     
  10. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,246
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri

    Very interesting. My vet does them in a chute and they do not get knocked out. Sounds like a good price for all he did.
     
  11. bricned

    bricned Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    96
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    Location:
    Louisiana
    My vet gave me a price of &11.00 just yesterday to dehorn my jersey.
     
  12. Oakshire_Farm

    Oakshire_Farm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    931
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver Island, British Columbia, CANADA
    Thanks for the welcome topside! The knives are not quite done yet! I cannot wait to see them. I think that there is a pic of my jersey with her horns on my website, www.freewebs.com.oakshire_farm
     
  13. amaliayosa

    amaliayosa Member

    Messages:
    5
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2007
    We are having our mini Jersey Jasmine dehorned next week . I'm pretty freaked out by it and really hope all goes well.
    We dont have a head gate or chute to restrain her but the vet is going to sedate her first.
    Any ideas on a make shift head gate?
    Amy
     
  14. Oakshire_Farm

    Oakshire_Farm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    931
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver Island, British Columbia, CANADA
    If you just need her restrained long enough to get her sedated, get a halter on her and tie her up, it is best if you can get her against a wall so you can pin her. Or a nice big tree so you can tie her nice and short. once she goes down it is best not to have her in a head lock incase she falls and gets her head stuck.
     
  15. francismilker

    francismilker Udderly Happy! Supporter

    Messages:
    2,842
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    With these $70-100 prices quoted above, are you folks talking about getting horns "surgically" removed? I usually disbud them as baby calves and only use the vet when they get to about 1" in diameter or larger at the base so they can be seered and have the veins stripped out. To have this done at the farm he usually charges me $5 each plus a trip fee.

    As far as a makeshift headgate, I'd not use one for dehorning. This process is usually a small rodeo and requires me to halter the animal and pull their head to one side while the vet does the bloody work. If you need something just for the sedation shot you can hem them up against a good solid built corral fence and then swing a gate into them and tie it back to the fence. If your vet is pretty quick with needle work and your critter is tame the shots can usually be given uneventful.
     
  16. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,246
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    Yes, they are discussing surgical removal of adult/young adult horns. The heifer in question is much to old to disbudd.
    My calves get disbudded too, but I have had a few dehorned in the past as yearlings/adults. My vet only charges $2.50-$10.00 per head for the surgical dehorning, depending on how many you bring in. I just called her to make sure I was remembering correctly.
     
  17. Allen W

    Allen W Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,762
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    NW OK
    I think what francismilker is asking if they are doing show calf type dehorning. Cutting and peeling back the flesh at the base of the horn and then taking the horn off and sewing the flaps of flesh back together. Any way that has been my question about it.
     
  18. Farmsteader

    Farmsteader Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    46
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2008
    Location:
    No central Arkansas
    My Vet here in NoArkansas -Flippin area, just pops out the little buds on yearlings with a scoop tool, very low cost ,you can't see anything after a month or so.We have to take our 9 week old very soon, would have taken her earlier but she was sick, now she is strong and Healthy. gotta Getterdone! This Week.
     
  19. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

    Messages:
    10,838
    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Location:
    Zone 7
    I have a neighbor that uses the small green castrating bands. He takes a rasp and makes a small groove around the base of the horn and applies two of the "cherio" bands to each horn placing the bands in the groove he made. Works for him and he told me after the band is on for a while the animals seems to ignore it. He did mention that he does not use that method in fly season.
     
  20. cur huntin' kid

    cur huntin' kid Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    210
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Burning them is easier than anything else. No blood and less chance of infection, the worst part is the smell because you always burn a little hair too. This has to be done when they are really small.