How to clear brush?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Joe in MO, Apr 22, 2005.

  1. Joe in MO

    Joe in MO Active Member

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    I started clearing brush along our hillside last Fall. It was overgrown with brush, stickers, tree sapplings, etc. It looked real cluttered. The area was really looking good until this Spring, when the trees dropped their seedlings and with the rain, well...it looks like I haven't done a thing to it because it is overgrown.
    Does anyone have any good ideas for clearing brush and tree sapplings and to prevent them from coming back?
    Thanks in advance,
    Joe
     
  2. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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  3. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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  4. Joe in MO

    Joe in MO Active Member

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    Fire won't work because:
    It will burn my trees that I want to save
    The hill is rocky so the fire will not spread very quickly
    The brush and tree sapplings will continue to grow back.
    But thanks for the suggestions though :)
     
  5. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    It sounds like it was pretty wild and not maintained for a while. So go in there and clear it again and then mow it several times this spring/summer. Us a brushhog if it's that tough or, after cutting it all down, your mower/weedwhacker.

    But the wind is always gonna blow seed pods and even clearing will let some dormant seeds come to life. What is it you are trying to achieve? Manicured look or just a less prickly pleasant to walk through place or...?

    Of course, someone is bound to suggest goats which I have no experience with.
     
  6. Ken in Maine

    Ken in Maine Well-Known Member

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  7. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    I too would suggest goats - they like what you want to get rid of better than fine pasture! An additional help would be a couple of pigs as they will root up and thus reduce the growback problem. Of course, it will then have to be maintained, but you'd be surprised how much the goats and pigs can do for you - and reduce YOUR workload.
     
  8. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    All of those are good ideas but also talk to your ag supplier for chemical sprays for regrowth and new sprouts. Forget the organic thing on this problem.
     
  9. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Mix these 2 herbicides using 2 pints of Grazon P+D and 1 pint of Remedy rate per acre and spray no later than May. Two sprayings at one year intervals should wipe out the problem.
     
  10. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    If you Cut them or Burn them,four or five will come up in their place.Put Goats on there heavy for three years,cut the bigger stuff out of the way.

    If you put some Grass seed on it to help out all the better.But in three years the sprouts will be dead and not come back.

    big rockpile
     
  11. kate

    kate Well-Known Member

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    each time you cut one, put squirt of tordan on stump, it will not come back up. hard on the back, but def. worth it.......i have used it in mo on all the stuff and it works, only takes a little tiny bit............k.
     
  12. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    lowes sells a nifty poison its bright orange and it sticks to everything like glue...
    i call it agent orange it really upsets the lowes people...

    its thick enoguh to be a selective spray, so buy a few gal and spray it on what you want dead.

    agent orange.... its a good thing.
     
  13. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    The answer is simple and old - scythe with a brush blade. A heavy brush blade will take down saplings up to an inch thick or more. Repeat a couple times and it will stop growing back. Got mine here - http://www.scythesource.com/ - very good and knowledgable guy.

    Scythe gets you in where you can really get a good look at the land, it's relaxing and very good exercise. I've just finished clearing an acre of briar bushes 8 feet tall. Scythe goes thru them like butter. And it will go places a brush hog can only dream - anywhere you can step, a scythe will go. Plus, no poisoning the land and everything on it. The classic homesteading answer - low cost, lots of elbow grease, low tech.
     
  14. Ana Bluebird

    Ana Bluebird Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was going to say, goats, too. They do an excellent job of brush clearing if you have fences, plus the children love them.
     
  15. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong Administrator

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    I agree that goats are a good answer IF you've got the fences to hold them. However, they are getting ahead of the brush for the good reason that you're overstocking - you have deliberately got more goats than the land can sustain on a permanent basis. That means you'd better have a plan for disposing of the surplus goats when the job's done. There's often a market for "brush goats". Alternatively, you can eat them.

    However, you in the USA have goat diseases which will more-or-less permanently infect the land, so you may need to spend heaps on getting clean healthy goats - amounts inconsistent with scrubby old brush goats.
     
  16. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    :haha: GO TO THE BARBER!!!!! :HAHA:
     
  17. gilberte

    gilberte Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Joe, I think that if you're into animals at all, goats have been the best answer so far. If you don't care for the goat idea, maybe the bushhog would work for you if the terrain will handle it. As someone else said, it depends on what you are trying to achieve here.

    I really hope you don't resort to using chemicals. From your post number I assume you are fairly new here so I'll tell you the Mr. NW Sneaky is probably just being contrary with his suggestion and trying to "stir the pot." Comfortablynumb is, of course, being facititious.
     
  18. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    Why call out individuals? I bet you are a PETA supporter. I speak from sixty-plus years of experience in the country. I have no need to agitate as I am very peaceful, happy and totally satisfied with my current life; sounds as if the same may not hold true for you.
     
  19. Joe in MO

    Joe in MO Active Member

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    Another question: How can cutting down the tree sapplings and brush for 1-3 years make it not come back after that???
    I like caberjim's idea. Has anyone else ever used one?
    Thanks for the help,
    Joe
     
  20. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    Saplings and brush need leaves for energy and growth. Deny them that and the roots will eventually wither and die.