How deep to plant elephant garlic?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by BearCreekFarm, Sep 28, 2006.

  1. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    We are in NW Minnesota, Zone 3. I have some elephant garlic to plant but I am not sure how deep to plant it.
     
  2. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    With your soil being nice and loose, plant elephant garlic cloves so that there are two full inches of soil above the tip. Easiest way is to just press them into the ground.

    For true garlic, one inch of soil above the tips of the cloves.

    Martin
     

  3. harrisjnet

    harrisjnet Okie with Attitude

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    In your area, you would probably need to plant at least 6 inches deep. You could maybe get by planting more shallow if you mulched pretty deep through the winter.
     
  4. SquashNut

    SquashNut Well-Known Member

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    I plant mine 2 inches deep in the soil then put several inches of mulch over that. By spring the tops grow through the mulch.
     
  5. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    NO, NO, NO! 6 inches will assure that they are buried rather than planted! No garlic, elephant or otherwise, needs more than 2" of soil above the tip of the clove. That's an inch more than recommended by most professional growers. Some even advise just barely covering the tip. In our 5,000 plant field, elephant garlic and regular garlic are treated alike as far as depth of planting goes.

    Mulching is not going to prevent frost from going deep into the ground in our cold zones. Instead, it prevents or deters freeze-thaw-freeze-thaw cycles which tear the roots off of bulbs and tubers. We use 3" of oat straw in the field and 2" of shredded leaves at home.

    Martin