Goats vs. Sheep

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Kye022984, Sep 6, 2010.

  1. Kye022984

    Kye022984 Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking about starting some meat goats but, have recently had some local criticism about the taste of goat's meat vs. lamb. I haven't researched much on lamb and know a lot about goats from our own dairy goats but what do you all think? Which meat tastes better? Which meat is better for you? Between goats and sheep which ones are the most easy to keep? Are sheep loud? If anyone has some advice that will help greatly thanks.
     
  2. HappyFarmer

    HappyFarmer Well-Known Member

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    Hah!

    The proper response for this question on the GOATS forum is goat meat tastes better, of course!

    Good luck in whatever you decide. Not much help, am I?

    HF
     

  3. Minelson

    Minelson Well-Known Member

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    Since you already have goats I would stick with the goats. Then you don't have to mess with getting different minerals and such...It just sounds easier to me. Also, it depends on who you talk to about the meat. Goat meat is more popular in the Hispanic community from what I heard.
     
  4. Eunice

    Eunice Well-Known Member

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    I have both. My lambs are WAY LOUDER than my kids, every day of the week. I like both meats. The lamb meat usually has more fat than the goat meat. I have never had Boer or Kiko meat, just Alpines from my milking does. I get bummer lambs for free in the spring and raise them on goat milk. It fits my program.
     
  5. Our Little Farm

    Our Little Farm Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have both. I prefer my sheep to the goats any day. How much the lamb fat has depends on the breed. Some purebred meat is not fatty at all. Ours are pasture raised only.
     
  6. Kye022984

    Kye022984 Well-Known Member

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    Well I posted this same thread in both goat and sheep forums. I needed opinions ! :) Anyway, We live in a part of San Diego with a lot of Arabic and Hispanic people. They ALL love the goats. In fact, my neighbor took some of my goat milk home to his mom who made some AWESOME yogurt! So, as far as the goat meat goes, I know we would have the consumers to sell the meat but, I would also like meat for my family as well. So, I guess it's time to sit down in front of a goat meat/lamb meat dinners.
     
  7. Minelson

    Minelson Well-Known Member

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    Yes...if it's for you, the only way to know is to compare the 2. :)
     
  8. Heritagefarm

    Heritagefarm Pro-facter Supporter

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    The goats don't randomly drop dead for no reason, which sheep are notorious for. A good piece of conventional wisdom: never invest in $10,000 of sheep. You end up with $3,000 worth left. I don't know about meat goats, everyone says they drop dead, too. Unless you keep them in a lot and feed them hay all year, but that can be done to anything.
     
  9. Creamers

    Creamers Lucas Farm & WV Raw Milk

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    As my vet says in school they teach, "Sick Sheep Seldom Survive" - but he says you can easily sub goat for sheep - the same seems to still apply. lol
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2010
  10. copperpennykids

    copperpennykids Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Goats don't drop dead! LOL Basic care and they thrive.

    Goat vs Lamb: Well, my very good friend makes a mean leg of lamb. Her Swiss grandmother taught her to make it and it is excellent (and I really don't care for lamb). However, 3 years ago, she purchased a Boer wether from us to raise with her sheep (she usually raises 2 sheep over the summer). Fed them the same - some hay and grain, and butchered when the goat was about 110 lbs and the sheep was 125.

    Fast Forward to dinner shortly thereafter: She made leg of goat for dinner. Her children (14-19 years of age, and admittedly a bit spoiled) all declared that it was the best leg of lamb she had ever made! When she told them it was goat, they all declared that she should "dump the stupid sheep and only raise goats!" Her only complaint is that she likes the goats, so feels badly when it is butcher time. She never feels bad when it is time for the sheep to go... LOL
     
  11. Creamers

    Creamers Lucas Farm & WV Raw Milk

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    I don't know - lol. I do everything for my goats:
    I started with quality stock
    CAE and CL free
    Copper bolus
    Quality loose mineral
    Free range with unlimited browse
    wormed with Cydectin when needed
    BO-SE twice a year
    Alfalfa pellets for does
    AC on bucks feed
    and reg hoof trims

    and mine try their best to die all of the time. My vet
    says mine are proof goats have no will to live - lol!
    Now mind, I haven't lost a single goat to illness or such.
    Not one, not a kid or adult; however, I have spent a fortune keeping them alive.
    lol. Prevention is highly $$$ with goats. ha ha. Good thing I love them.


    The vet I use when I can't get my regular out says he couldn't keep
    Boers alive enough to make a profit and sold the herd out and runs 150 Kikos
    now, and he says they are the only goat he can make a profit from.

    I've never had sheep, but if they are worse than goats - MERCY! LOL!

    Better just taste each and decide which you prefer to eat.
     
  12. Slev

    Slev Well-Known Member Supporter

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    ...being a sheep person, who just comes on here to squeeze my teats every now and then, (Since we just have the 1 Alpine doe and a few kids now) but I am finding that old time farmers had the right idea. Every farm animal has a purpose) on the farm. We are really enjoying our dairy doe, making cheese, drinking milk i know where it comes from, ...it's all good... (I personally like lamb over goat, but to be fair, we only had goat once) If you're really worried, try it out on Farmville first...
     
  13. Ernie

    Ernie Well-Known Member

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    I've had both goats and sheep and I think the sheep are ultimately easier to maintain. Goats constantly test your fences and your patience. Sheep are just dumb and occasionally find themselves in trouble.

    With both you're going to need very good fencing. I think lamb meat ultimately can be served in a wider variety of ways and has a lot of fat which is extremely healthy for you. Goats can give milk where (most) sheep can't.

    Why not try some of both your first few years? They graze exceptionally well beside each other and having mixed livestock grazing on a pasture is very healthy for the pasture.
     
  14. Lada

    Lada Well-Known Member

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    They do great together actually, you would just have to copper bolus your goats. But as far as for your pasture, you can't do any better than to have them both together as the sheep eat what the goats won't, and vice versa.

    We have goats for milk and get a couple of lambs to raise on the goat's milk for meat. We also eat the extra goat kids that we can't sell. We just really like lamb.
     
  15. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    Arabs and Hispanics will buy lambs also.

    Get some "hair" sheep if you don't want the wool and the troubles of shearing
     
  16. Key

    Key Well-Known Member

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    Our lambs and goats are fine in the pasture together. My husband & children prefer our Suff. lambs as they seem to put more weight on for us on the same amount of feed. I prefer our Boer cross goats as I think they have more personality, but personality does not pay the bills. Could be genetics though, but we can hardly believe how quickly the lambs grow when you put feed in front of them!!
     
  17. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    If you are just talking about taste, I MUCH prefer goat meat over lamb. I'd like to try lamb from a couple of breeds I've never tried, though -- I've heard/read that Icelandic meat is better than most. The other issues are management and feed efficiency issues primarily. It's easier to get cut and dried answers to those questions, but taste is pretty subjective (I suspect that the reason I prefer goat is that we never ever had lamb when I was growing up -- we were raised on wild game; moose, caribou, bison, and so on, and goat is more like venison).

    Kathleen
     
  18. Goat Servant

    Goat Servant Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Let's see if I can find the nutrional value on chevon...
    mmm yes;

    "Goat meat is 50-65% lower in fat than similarly prepared beef, but has similar protein content.The USDA has also reported that saturated fat in cooked goat meat is 40% lower than chicken, even with the skin removed.
    3oz roasted;
    calories 122
    Fat 2.58 gram
    Sat'd Fat .79 gram
    Protein 23 mg
    Iron 3.3

    source; USDA handbook#8, 1989. Nutritive value of foods, Home & Garden Bulletin #72 USDA WA DC 1981"

    It surpasses beef pork lamb & chicken in those levels:D
     
  19. Our Little Farm

    Our Little Farm Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We've never had a sheep drop dead either.

    As for shearing. We have a shearer come, he charges $10 per sheep, does their feet, shots and shears and has a drink with us. Great person. :)

    I prefer sheep in that they stay out of trouble. We have purebred heritage sheep that are very self sufficient. Wonderful wool, and lamb easily. What more can you ask for?
     
  20. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    I don't like the taste of lamb/mutton. It has a funny whang to it.

    Much prefer goat.

    If you already have goats, I'd continue that way. Goat minerals are bad for sheep, and you'd have to figure out how to provide separate minerals to keep the sheep safe.