Fast Growing Shade Tree?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by cindybode, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. cindybode

    cindybode Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    130
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2002
    Location:
    OH/PA line, up near the lake
    Hi all,

    We have a chicken coop/run out in the back that absolutely bakes during the day. I'm looking for a good shade tree to put back there. The tree will be planted in the adjoining pasture, so it can't be toxic to goats or horses. I want something that won't take years to reach a reasonable, shade producing height. We're in zone 5. Any suggestions?

    Thanks,
    Cindy
     
  2. Jimmy Mack

    Jimmy Mack Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    73
    Joined:
    May 7, 2004
    Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica)
    A deciduous tree from the Olive Family (Oleaceae)

    Green Ash, one of the most common and rapidly growing woodland trees and is also a popular shade tree for urban areas, well-known for its adaptability to almost any site. One of the first trees to change color and drop its leaves in autumn, it is native to eastern and central North America, where it is found primarily in floodplains, cut-over forests, and abandoned fields. It grows to about 60 feet tall by 40 feet wide when found in the open, with a medium to rapid growth rate. Its shape is upright oval when young, becoming upright spreading to upright rounded with maturity. In addition, its lower branches become both pendulous and upswept with age. As a member of the Olive Family, Green Ash is related to the other Ashes, as well as the Fringetrees, Forsythias, Privets, and Lilacs.

    Historically, Green Ash was once considered a variety of Red Ash. The old Red Ash was distinguished by the ruddy fuzziness on its leaflet undersides and stems, and for the tendency of its fall foliage to have traces of a burgandy or red color. The old Green Ash had leaf and stem features that were smooth. Now, these two types of Ash are considered as one, and are collectively called Green Ash.

    Planting Requirements - Green Ash is very adaptable to a wide range of soil types (organic, clay, sandy, or rocky), soil pHs (acidic, neutral, or alkaline), and moisture levels (wet, moist, or dry). It is noted for being extremely tolerant to many types of environmental stresses (summer heat, reflected light, sweeping winds, drought, flooding, poor soils, compacted soils, high pH soils, winter salt spray, winter salt deposition, and air pollution). It grows in full sun to partial sun, and is found in zones 3 to 9.

    Potential Problems - Among the common ash trees, Green Ash is generally the most healthy. This is why it is overplanted as a street tree and shade tree in urban areas (only the seedless male cultivars are sold as landscape trees today). However, borers and scales are still occasional pests, while leaf anthracnose and trunk canker are occasional diseases. In addition, seed litter (from female trees), surface roots (with age in compacted or shallow soils), and storm damage (at maturity due to easily splittable wood with weak crotch angles) are potential liabilities, primarily in urban areas.

    Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis), a destructive exotic pest from Asia, was positively identified in Lucas County, Ohio in February 2003. This metallic wood-boring beetle attacks all species of ash, and has no known significant natural enemies in this country. Control involves the cutting, chipping, and incineration of the infested tree(s). Click here for more information about the Emerald Ash Borer
     

  3. Jimmy Mack

    Jimmy Mack Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    73
    Joined:
    May 7, 2004
    any of the cottonwoods or poplars would also work as they are fast growers ~ but need more water. With both types expect some branch drop caused by inclement weather so locate and prune accordingly. Cottonwoods are really care free (except for the breaking branches :) ) and are one of my favorites.

    good luck with that!
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    A weeping willow grows like a weed and does well in zone 5. One tree in the middle of the chicken park would make shade for 100 old hens and three billy goats. They spread out to about 50 feet wide. Chinese Elm grows very fast, but sheds little limbs all the time. Silver maples grow fast, but they are trashy also. I'd get some native maples to start with. I'll give you a few if you come by. I could give you some mulberrys that grow fast, but I wouldn't wish them on anyone.
    Is there a reason you can't put a tree in your chicken yard.
     
  5. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    998
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2003
    Location:
    SC Kansas
    There are hybrid willows and hybrid poplars that grow fast and provide shade, but as with most fast growing trees, there is the risk of breakage from storms and maybe more important, these kinds of trees tend to put out very superficial roots that suck all the water from the surrounding area. MAy or may not be a problem where you want them. Also, consider a silver maple.
     
  6. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

    Messages:
    28,248
    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    SE Missouri
    It is going to take a while for anything to get tall enough to cast shade. maybe you could put a tarp or shade cloth over part of the run?
     
  7. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

    Messages:
    1,265
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2003
    Location:
    Zone Unknown
    If you plant a silver maple, I will personally come over there and give you a stern lecture. :yeeha:
     
  8. katydidagain

    katydidagain Adventuress--Definition 2 Supporter

    Messages:
    4,174
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2004
    Location:
    NE FL until the winds blow
    I was waiting for you to pipe up! :haha:

    katy
     
  9. I stuck some willow twigs (upright variety, not weeping)in the ground last spring, and this year they're about 15' tall. They started out about 5-6' tall, with a foot or two stuck in the ground. Something like this or hybrid poplar might be good for fast shade, but plant a "good" tree nearly- maybe a red maple or pin oak(also relatively fast growing). Plan on cutting down the "trashy" tree in a few years when the "good" tree gets a bit of size on it.

    -shakeytails in KY
     
  10. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

    Messages:
    393
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2002
    Location:
    California
    I vote for a white mulberry. The berrys taste great, the chickens will eat what you dont. The leaves are good for horses and goats. And they grow fast.
     
  11. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    998
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2003
    Location:
    SC Kansas
    OK, OK. I repent in dust and ashes. :eek: I agree that silver maples are not a very good tree, but they do grow fast and they do provide shade. Actually, I am putting in some chinese pistache trees. They are not real fast growers, but are supposed to be real hardy and goo shade trees.
     
  12. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,193
    Joined:
    May 13, 2002
    Location:
    Tennessee
    I vote for Chinese Empress tree or Pawlownia. I never saw anything grow as fast as that tree. It went from seedling to above the roof (peak) of the house in two years. Chinese value the wood. Big leaves would cast a lot of shade. Rita
     
  13. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

    Messages:
    3,471
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Location:
    NC
    A few states out there have outlawed Paulonia tomentosa. It's everything they advertise, and more...extremely fast growing, huge leaves, lovely, night-scented flowers...and it's as invasive as kudzu. Lots of tax dollars are being spent trying to eradicate it from parts of the US, while it's being freely planted still in others.

    Invasive exotic plants and animals are a huge peeve of mine. Sorry if I'm sounding rude here.

    Meg :)
     
  14. Jimmy Mack

    Jimmy Mack Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    73
    Joined:
    May 7, 2004
  15. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

    Messages:
    1,265
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2003
    Location:
    Zone Unknown
    I'm with you, Meg. I spend half my time here battling invasives. :no: I NEVER NEVER realized the issues they present until I moved here.

    Big problem, those invasives. :no:
     
  16. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,030
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    Our fastest growing trees and bushes are hybrid poplar, quaking aspen, rose of sharon, and elderberry. I'm not sure if any of these are toxic to goats (I know that oak is, but that's the only one I've seen a warning on for goats so far) . We really haven't had much breakage on the hybrid poplars, but it's not terribly windy here. I have a weeping willow shading the chicken pen, but it's kind of scraggly, so this year I planted a row of sunflowers right behind the pen to help out when the sun is low. I don't have any goats to nibble them, though! :)
     
  17. cindybode

    cindybode Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    130
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2002
    Location:
    OH/PA line, up near the lake
    Thanks for all the great ideas. I was thinking about a willow, since the area does not drain well and there is a LOT of extra water back there. DH wants a mulberry tree, since he had one when growing up and loves the berries. I'm not really sure what I want. I definitely can't plant anything that hates wet feet.

    The chicken yard itself is kind of narrow, and putting the tree in the middle of it will eventually interfere with getting in and out. The yard backs up to the pasture, where there is plenty of room, and so I was going to plant the tree near the pasture fence where it would hang over and shade the chickens.

    Uncle Will, if you have mulberries you don't want I would be happy to take them off your hands.

    Cindy
     
  18. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    24,572
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Location:
    MS
    The chickens would really appreciate the mulberry and it's free chicken feed for you!

    We've just started our farm (moved in the first of March this year) and I've got a tiny start on an orchard...one mulberry and two apple trees (the peach trees got bush-hogged by the neighbor trying to be helpful).

    I am amazed at how fast the mulberry is growing! And pleased too! So my vote would be for a mulberry tree.
     
  19. Cedar

    Cedar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    208
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2004
    Location:
    Pa
    Yeah...I'd go for the tried and true maple. I like the Red Maple. If you have dry soil, may have to go with a crapply Locust. Remember, Weeping Willows shed a lot of sticks.

    Bye
     
  20. bluereef

    bluereef Active Member

    Messages:
    27
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2003
    Location:
    FL, TN