Don't Put All Your Eggs In One Basket

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by big rockpile, Aug 27, 2007.

  1. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    When I was Farming I always had something to fall back on if I lost on another thing.

    Talked with a Guy that has 3,000 acres down in the Bootheel of Missouri.Because of Corn Prices he put most his place in Corn and 300 acres in Watermelons.

    Well because of the drought he didn't have Corn.Because of Gas Prices he couldn't find anyone that would haul his Watermelons.

    So this year was a complete loss :shrug:

    big rockpile
     
  2. travlnusa

    travlnusa Well-Known Member

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    Did he have insurance?
     

  3. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    Is he new at this, or just not very bright?
     
  4. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Yea he had Insurance on the Corn,they came out considerd it a 50% loss but in truth I would say much more.

    No mammabooh they have been at this for almost a hundred years.The place takes care of 3 families.But I see this happen with so many Big Farmers anymore.

    They are either into just Cattle,Grain,or Hogs.Never see them in a variety of things.Me I was into almost everything,but Milk Check twice a month kept me going.

    big rockpile
     
  5. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    Wow...how very sad. It's no wonder farmers continue to sell off their land to make room for new housing developments. I'm of the opinion that you should have 100% of your income come from 10 different places. We're up to 4 streams...need to keep worinkg on those and add some more.

    Maybe that farmer could let the corn dry in the field and then sell the stalks as fall decorations. Around here, they charge $5.00 for a "bundle" of about 3 stalks. Some local farmers make more money with corn mazes than they ever did from the crop. Folks just have to be creative.
     
  6. RockyGlen

    RockyGlen Well-Known Member

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    We see it here, too. The weather has been so unpredictable, and the prices of so many things have gone through the roof. Lots of people are leaving their fields empty and selling off their cows.

    We are as diversified as we can be right now. We have oats, wheat, corn, alfalfa, chickens, eggs, and a few beef. Dh also does backhoe and tractor work.

    However, if we did not have the savings to buy an old combine we would have been in the same shape. The guy that always came and harvested for us said he was not doing it anymore because of the cost of fuel. We searched on the internet and ended up going 3 states away to pick up a combine, but we can now do that for our close neighbors, also.

    And owning the combine, we will enlarge the wheat, oat, and corn fields and make our own feed, possibly having that to sell, too.

    For next year we are also going to put in a U-pick area. People around here seem to be seeing the writing on the wall and are asking for local food production that they can depend on for safety, availability, etc.

    Small farms can not make it anymore if they aren't flexible.
     
  7. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Be too hard to do that.If he would have had Cattle he could have cut Silage..

    I know I lost couple hundred acreas of Wheat one time because a Train caught it on fire.I went back in planted it in Beans,still had a crop just not what I figured on.

    big rockpile
     
  8. Karenrbw

    Karenrbw Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I live in the "desert" of NE Missouri. It seems the rain has gone all around us for the past couple of months. Driving along this weekend, I noticed many fields that had been cut for silage.
     
  9. hoggie

    hoggie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is something I wonder about a lot. We keep hearing how badly a lot of farmers are struggling, but maybe if they went back to more mixed farming? As I think you said in the OP, there would be fallbacks. At least enough to keep the cash rolling around, even if the most profitable crop went down, there would be something coming in?

    hoggie
     
  10. elkhound

    elkhound Well-Known Member Supporter

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    yes farms need to be more diverse in their products.treat it more like a investment on the stock market....mixed animals and mixed crops.
     
  11. junie

    junie Well-Known Member

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    I don't think the reason so many farmers are struggling is that they are not diverse enough. Years ago people tended to depend on one particular crop, too, and they did fine. The difference is that they were not in debt - they built their own homes and saved up for equipment. Today's farmers get too big, too fast and have to borrow a ton of money to get equipment to keep up with it all. Most, if not all, of them pay once a year on that debt. If the crop fails, they're sunk.
     
  12. RockyGlen

    RockyGlen Well-Known Member

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    Junie, you are right to some extent. It also does not help that people don't care about their communities and neighbors. It's all about the money and if they can save 10¢ a pound on chinese food at Walmart, well who cares if the local farm goes out of business. And once those farms are turned into suburbia they can't come back.

    You reap what you sow, and one day America is going to have to pay for the priorities it has set. If, for whatever reason, we can no longer import all our food.......it will not be pretty.
     
  13. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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    .
    All farms are nothing but a gamble to run, and there are no guaranties.

    If you plant 500-3000 acres with 10 different products, and it does not rain, or you have a large flood or hurricane you loose it all.

    If you have livestock it's all a gamble. The market goes up and down all the time it always has.

    A disease comes through and you loose a bunch of livestock there goes your profit that year.

    Everything you do on a farm you are taking a chance all the time.

    bumpus
    .
     
  14. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Had a neighbor rented some pasture and went up borrowed money for some Cows and was buying feed.I seen where this was going fast.He didn't have them Cows very long.

    Back when I was Farming I raised my own Feed,Milked Cows,had Beef Cattle,and Hogs.I only had 100 acres,but rented several hundred.Most my equipment was New but it wasn't more than I needed.

    Me and my first DW paid cash for our Farm.Which we saved my Paycheck,paid Bills and everything with hers.Plus I made good money in the Fur Business back then and we was only paying $35 a month for a Farm House that had all we needed,as far as Garden Spot and Chicken House.All helped out to save for our Farm. :shrug:

    big rockpile
     
  15. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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  16. junie

    junie Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't agree with you more.