Do Cats Have Kittens in the Winter?

Discussion in 'Working and Companion Animals' started by ShezaWildOne, Feb 24, 2007.

  1. ShezaWildOne

    ShezaWildOne Member

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    I have a barn cat that appears to be pregnant, but I've never had a cat have kittens in the winter. Is this possible? I have 15 cats and all but two are spade at this time (cats were dumped at my country home). I was suspecting FIP, but she appears very active and healthy.

    Thanks!
     
  2. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

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    Yup!
    I've got 4 cute little darlings that are 3 weeks old!
     

  3. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    I've got a cat due in a couple weeks. Yay. LOL
     
  4. RagdollCatLady

    RagdollCatLady Member

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    As a breeder of Ragdoll Cats, I can tell you that yes, cats do have kittens in the winter. If you can catch the cat and look at her nipples, they would be bright pink if she is pregnant. If she has FIP, her coat and eyes will start looking really crappy; you'll have no doubt that she is sick just by looking at her. Eventually she would stop eating altogether and nothing you do would entice her. One problem is there is no reliable test for FIP, so dont be talked into putting her to sleep based soley on a so-called "FIP Test".


    http://www.CTragdollKittens.com :benice:
     
  5. HazyDay

    HazyDay Well-Known Member

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    yes! it seems all my aunts cats have them in the dead of winter. Queens (females) to what im told come into heat 2 times a year so a queen should have about 12 kittens a year? right??
     
  6. jen74145

    jen74145 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Aha! A fellow cat breeder! :dance: Glad to see you!

    Hazyday, queens come in heat year round, and if conditions are favorable (enough food, gentle weather and whatnot) they will eventually STAY in heat until bred (or spayed). No fun for kitty at all... And they can rebreed three weeks after having kittens. Queens can have anywhere from 1-12 kittens a litter, but average size seems to be 3-5 per litter. Huge litters usually don't make it, as they are usually small, weak kittens, and mama doesn't have enough milk, but I have heard of one dedicated breeder pulling all twelve through. Largest litter I have ever had was five, though... my girls (thankfully!) are more in the 2-4 category.

    FIP... bah, wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy. FIP and I don't quite see eye-to-eye (yes, I've given the wicked thing a persona, lol). It is devastating, if she had FIP, she wouldn't be her bouncy, normal-kitty self at all.
     
  7. ShezaWildOne

    ShezaWildOne Member

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    What is the best prevention of FIP? I do have a problem with it in my kittens. If I don't get them off my property at 6 weeks of age, they die around 10 weeks of age from FIP.
     
  8. GrannyG

    GrannyG Well-Known Member

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    Yep...Winter, Spring,Summer, Fall, LOL
     
  9. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    FIP is caused by a common corona virus (ie nearly all cats get exposed to it at some time-although MOST cats respond properly to the virus and do not develop FIP). Basically the only way to decrease the chance of the kittens getting FIP is to wean them at 4-6 weeks and keep them in isolation away from their mother and other cats on your property.

    Here's a link to VIN's Veterinary Partner and if you search for FIP there are several articles on the site: http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx