Crock Pot Wild Rabbit

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Ken Scharabok, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    One of the guys who hunts on my property brought me by a dressed wild rabbit. As I recall I've eaten rabbit twice in my life. Once in about the 6th grade came home to find three of them in a cage on the back steps. Oh, boy, pets. Turned out they were to be Sunday dinner for out-of-town company. Other was I bought a package of frozen rabbit over which I wasn't particularly impressed for the price.

    I would expect this one to be 'a bit gamey'.

    Does anyone have a good crock pot stew recipe? I looked at the recipe thread and didn't see anything in particular. Please use a KISS concept.
     
  2. General Brown

    General Brown Well-Known Member

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    I have never cooked a wild rabbit in a crock pot, but I sure have fried many of them. Fry it just like you would a chicken.
     

  3. stranger

    stranger Well-Known Member

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    I've smoked it, fried it,boiled it, cooked it on an open fire but hadn't put it in a crock pot yet, although it sounds like a plan, dinner cooking while we're gone. I would think just put the cut up rabbit in with chicken broth, a couple chicken bouillon cubes, a stick of celeray,an onion and a carrot.salt pepper,garlick.
     
  4. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wild rabbit is generally very good, but it is a redder meat than domestic. They are two different species and you should not expect the meat to taste exactly the same. Enjoy each for what it is.

    A crock pot is an easy way to cook rabbit. You can brown the pieces of meat first if you wish, then deglaze the frying pan with your cooking liquid. You can also skip the browning and just put the meat into the crock pot with carrots, onions, mushrooms, parsnips, turnip... whatever veggies you like. You can add potatoes to the stew or rice, but barley is great too. Rice and barley swell a lot so either precook or add extra liquid.

    Apple juice gives rabbit a lovely flavour and is a good cooking liquid. Dilute it half and half with water. Season the stew with bay leaf, thyme, rosemary or sage (or other favourite herbs), salt and pepper and let the whole thing simmer until the meat is very tender.
     
  5. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

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    I've been known to make an out-of-this-world Salsa Rabbit by putting the rabbit pieces in the crockpot, then covering with a jar of Salsa. Let cook all day and serve over or with rice. Yummmy!

    NeHi
     
  6. o&itw

    o&itw aka avdpas77 Supporter

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    Marianate in any comercial marianade, or a mixture of half water, half cider vinegar, a medium sliced onion, a couple of slices of lemon, salt, a little sugar, a sachet of pickling spice (you can use one of those aluminum loose tea boiling thingys and fill it 2/3 full if you don't have any cloth bags) and a clove or two of garlic.

    Maianate cut up rabbit for 1 to 3 days. brown in olive oil, then crockpot till tender using about 1/3 of the strained marianade. Serve with boiled potatoes and/or noodles.
     
  7. klickitat

    klickitat Well-Known Member

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    #1 replace with a farm raised rabbit. I have eaten and cooked both and would only eat wild rabbit if there was no other meat. Crock pot the rabbit in cream of mushroom soup. Simple easy and it helps with the wild rabbit. :buds:
     
  8. NorWester

    NorWester Well-Known Member

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    Is it cottontail or hare? Apparently they don't taste anything alike. I've never tried cottontail but have eaten plenty of snowshoe hare, which, depending on where it lives can affect the flavour of the meat.
    For example a cedar swamp hare tends to taste very gamey whereas a poplar stand hare isn't in the least.
     
  9. Horns Bach

    Horns Bach Well-Known Member

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    We've cooked our domestic rabbit in the crockpot using a great thai recipe that includes coconut juice, onions, potatoes, chicken broth, and curry... (Coconut Rabbit Curry)...serve over rice.
     
  10. Bonnie L

    Bonnie L Well-Known Member

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    You know, it's against the rules to post something like this without the full recipe! ;)
     
  11. Gianni

    Gianni Well-Known Member

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    Spice it like your favorite chicken recipe, brown it in oil and finish it covered in a 350 oven.
     
  12. o&itw

    o&itw aka avdpas77 Supporter

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    Can't tell you about hare....

    Cottontail is delicious, but quite different than domestic rabbit.

    The recipe I gave above is sort of a version of hausenpheffer.... It works with wild rabbit much better than tame rabbit. Wild rabbit has a taste more akin to squirrel.
     
  13. Backfourty,MI.

    Backfourty,MI. Katie Supporter

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    Use to Love wild rabbit. Dh used to hunt them before we started raising our own, now I'm so spoiled with the domesticated!
    I use to coat them in flour & what ever herbs & spice I like & fry them in hot oil just to brown them. Then put in the oven with eith any kind of wine you like or chicken broth, cover & bake at about 375 degree's until really tender! It good that way, otherwise I think the wild is too tough.
     
  14. DENALI

    DENALI Well-Known Member

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    Just thought i would add one to the list..... As a kid we use to love cottontail coated in shake and bake and oven fried. We really liked the BBQ version of shake and bake.
     
  15. Somerhill

    Somerhill Well-Known Member

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    Check my blog for recipes for rabbit and lamb. Click on recipes to sort for just those from the rest of my farm related posts. I post a new recipe every Friday.

    http://somerhillfarm.blogspot.com
     
  16. trinityoaks

    trinityoaks Budding homesteader

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    OMG, y'all are making me hungry! Hmmm . . . time to breed those Cals, I think . . .
     
  17. Backfourty,MI.

    Backfourty,MI. Katie Supporter

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    Yep, I agree TrinityOaks, I start breeding mine tomarrow too. I hate winter breeding!
     
  18. jkmlad

    jkmlad Well-Known Member

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    Crock pot southern rabbit barbeque: Cut up rabbit and place in crock pot with one medium/ large onion. (I like onion). Distribute 5 whole cloves onto the meat throughout the crockpot. Pour in 1/2 C of water. Cook for 8-12 hours on low, until it will about fall off of the bone. Cool and pick off the bone. Toss the onions and cloves in trash. Saute another onion, about 2 t. of garlic, and one green pepper. Add a jalapeno pepper if you like it hot. Put meat back into the crockpot with the pepper/ onion mixture, and your favorite brand of barbeque sauce. Some folks like it saucy, some like it dry, so you decide how much sauce. I like Carolina style barbeque, so I mix my sauce half and half with apple cider vinegar and add 2 t. of mustard seed. For a real southern experience put some cole slaw on top of your sandwich... mmmm.