Cleaning Stove top grime catchers

Discussion in 'Cleaning and Organizing' started by Natalie11, May 6, 2007.

  1. Natalie11

    Natalie11 Well-Known Member

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    Okay so I don't really remember what they are called, but the metal gas stove top food/sauce/whatever else falls in catchers.

    I am trying to find a good way to clean these. I have tried comet, regular dish soap, a steel wool pad, and I just can't seem to get all of the burned on stuff off.

    Do any of you wonderful people have a soak recipe or just a special way that you clean these? I tend to keep the stove top clean just not the catchers, and by the time I do get around to scrubbing them they are covered in black.

    Any ideas would be great, thanks!
     
  2. Twogun

    Twogun Zone 5

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    Try baking soda and vinegar.
     

  3. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Stick 'em in a plastic bag with ammonia and leave them over night. They'll rinse right off in the morning.
     
  4. Natalie11

    Natalie11 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions. . . I think I will try the vinegar and soda first and if that doesn't work, then move onto the ammonia in the bag. Funny how I can let stuff like this go for so long!
     
  5. ELOCN

    ELOCN Well-Known Member

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    Don't use rubbing alcohol! I used it one time on some greasy, sticky stuff on my gas stove top, and I thought to myself "Hmmm. I bet this could easily ignite," when suddenly it did!
     
  6. Lucy

    Lucy Well-Known Member

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    You mean the drip pans or the grates ? If they are stainless or enamel, spray with oven cleaner. It will come right off after it sits for a while. Same for any pyrex or corning ware dishes that are crusty. I have bought a lot of yucky looking ones at garage sales for cheap, done that to them and they looked brand new when done.
     
  7. Metagirrl

    Metagirrl Well-Known Member

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    We scrub ours, then run them through the self-cleaning cycle in the oven. Then, just rinse off the ash & they're like new. I put the gas-burner grates in there too.
     
  8. Missy M

    Missy M Well-Known Member

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    Oven cleaner.
     
  9. BeeFree

    BeeFree Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you don't have a big tub then use your bath tub, just get ready to clean it back up when done. Take dishwasher Electrolsol powder. After putting your oven railings, drip pans and burner grates in the tub, pour the powder in as you put in hot water. Depending on how grimmy, let soak at least 8 hrs. I then take a Mr Clean sponge and just wipe it off and rinse. Done mine the other day. I had to use the bath tub so that required using Mr Clean sponge afterward on it. This is the way I clean the rental stoves stuff up too.
     
  10. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I pour hot water on them, let them soak a couple minutes, then wipe off all of the surface grime. I do this a couple of times if it is bad. Then I am left with stuff that won't come off. I use baking soda on that, but any of the above suggestions would work.
     
  11. patnewmex

    patnewmex Jane of all trades

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    Oven cleaner, although I'm not crazy about the stuff, it will work.

    I'm going to try the amonia-in-a-bag trick next time. Sounds better.

    Pat
     
  12. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Pat--that's what I was gonna say. Oven cleaner.

    Once they're clean, if you clean them after every significant spill usually you can keep them from becoming carbonized again.
     
  13. CJ

    CJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is the way to do it, it works every time.

    Or go to Walmart and replace them LOL

    The Wandering Quilter's Life in a Box!
     
  14. RachAnn in NW Okla

    RachAnn in NW Okla Well-Known Member

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    I have odd sized one cause every time I buy some the new ones dont fit!!!!!

    so we have CRAPPY old ones....my solution was to clean them up a bit and then COVER with aluminum foil !!!! when they get too messy again, I just rip off the foil and redo it!

    Rachel
     
  15. MicheleMomof4

    MicheleMomof4 Well-Known Member

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    I do this as well and I have to say it works SO well. I use this method for even the grill grates on our BBQ grill. Pans with stuck on mess. A hint though, use a black trash bag for faster results! It heats up the contents more. :)
    God Bless,
    Michele
     
  16. blue gecko

    blue gecko Well-Known Member

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    I use a mix of Biz and Simple Green. Works very well.
     
  17. Milkwitch

    Milkwitch Well-Known Member

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    I put them in a big pan of water with baking soda and vinegar and boil it for a few hours, while I do other things then it gunk washes right off. leaves no scratching or toxic fumes!
     
  18. GrannyCarol

    GrannyCarol Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, they cost about a buck apiece, if I remember right. I've been known to replace them when the balance between work, cleaning solutions and new drip pans equals out. :) But I'm a pretty lazy housekeeper!