Can drinking water be stored in milk jugs

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Quiver0f10, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. Quiver0f10

    Quiver0f10 Well-Known Member

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    if we clean them really well? We go through tons of milk and just toss the jugs. I'd hate to have to buy enough bottled water to have on hand for the 12 of us. So, the logically solution would be to use milk jugs. Will this work?
     
  2. Snowdancer

    Snowdancer Well-Known Member

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    Quiver, I heard that for shorter term storage you can but the material they're made from is more degradable than say soda bottles.

    If you have friends or neighbors who go through a lot of soda-ask them to save their 2ltr bottles. Sterilize, fill with water and add 5 drops of bleach or grapefruitseed extract.
    I store all of my emergency water in 2 ltr bottles under the beds-it's sort of wasted space and you can put an incredible amount of them on their sides under a bed.
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Most families have 20,40, or 60 gallons of drinkable water stored in hot water tanks. Not a bad start!! I can't see why milk jugs wouldn't work, just replace them every 6-8 months!
     
  4. Snowdancer

    Snowdancer Well-Known Member

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    And if you have water beds the water is usable for toilet flushing.
     
  5. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ................I can buy one gallon plastic jugs of either drinking water , or distilled water for 58 centovos each at Wal-Mart . Think I'll try to buildup to about 40 gallons or so . I usually make both tea and coffee with "store bought water" . fordy.. :happy:
     
  6. sapphira

    sapphira Well-Known Member

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    Been doing it for years. I have several groups of stored water in the house. Ever so often - more like 6 months, I use the stored water in one group to water plants, or whatnot, and replace it. And yes the milk jugs work but the more solid bottles work better. Sapphira
     
  7. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Milk jugs are basically intended for immediate use and disposal/recycling. Made about as flimsy and can be and still do the job. I prefer cleaned out windshield water fluid bottles. They are VERY durable and have a nice locking cap. Larger, more durable, bottled water containers would be my next choice.

    What I use milk jugs for is for all those assorted bits and pieces of plastic, such as bread wrappers and newspaper sleeves. Just keep packing jug until pretty well solid and then put in recycle bin.

    The heavier duty ones can also be used to store foodstocks, such as instant rice, powdered milk, flour, sugar, salt, beans and crumbled up pasta. More insect resistent with an airtight-cap.
     
  8. Dave in Ohio

    Dave in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    I used them for years, had a few go bad,leaked out. But I still had some if the need arose. I would use them and if you can get something better fine, but some is better than none.
     
  9. gardentalk

    gardentalk Well-Known Member

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    Save the money, sterilize your own water. No reason why you can't make tea and coffee from your own water, regardless of where it comes from.
     
  10. mommymushbrain

    mommymushbrain Well-Known Member

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    I've been using a gallon Gatorade jug in my fridge for constant cold(er than tap water) water. Seems to be holding up fine, it's sturdier than the milk jugs I've tried.
     
  11. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Most milk jugs will fall apart in a few months with water in them. If you want to store water get a good food grade water containers. Dont overlook water containers at your local farm supply stores. They have large 100+gal tanks. One in the basement would make a great supply. Plum so you can flush the sytem every year and replentish the supply.
     
  12. wormlady

    wormlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was wondering about milk jugs too. I started filling them figuring I could at least use them for washing and flushing water if push came to shove.
     
  13. Ann-NWIowa

    Ann-NWIowa Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The only problem with milk jugs is after awhile they degrade and start leaking. Depending where you have them stored that is a problem. I have water in an unfinished basement so if they leak its no big deal. We prefer pop bottles but we don't drink pop enough around here to accumulate a useful supply. I've heard some people use canning jars rather than letting them set empty. We also have several jeep cans from our camping days.
     
  14. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    I keep filled milk jugs out in the well house. They last for well over a year with no leakers.
     
  15. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    If you buy distilled water in gallon plastic jugs at the grocery store. This water is inexpensive, free of bacterial contamination and is sealed in a food-grade container. You can store this water indefinitely. Purchase a case at a time.. 4 gallons to a box and the box stores nicely.
     
  16. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    This is what I do, hmm need to replenish supplies! I'm going to have to dedicate one room in the Mobile home for just Emergency Supplies.
     
  17. stickinthemud

    stickinthemud Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Don't trust store-bought jugs of water not to leak over time. I had a 2-gallon jug of drinking water sitting untouched in the kitchen that began seeping after about a year. No problem where it was, but storing it under the bed would have made a mess. (I probably shouldn't have let water sit in a plastic jug that long anyhow.)
     
  18. Quiver0f10

    Quiver0f10 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone. We have a 1 acre pond a stones throw from the house that we can use for flushing toilets. Even in winter where the water enters the pond is running so we'd be able to use it. I wouldn't drink this water but for toilets, its perfect.

    I can buy water from wally but I was just hoping to do it as cheap as possible. Especially with 12 people, I need to stock up on a lot of water. Dumb question, but is distilled water safe to drink? I mean what is the difference between distilled and normal bottled water? I have an infant, would he be able to drink distilled if needed? ( I am bre@stfeeding but in case something should happen to me I want him to be able to use formula)

    I was also thinking of buying a few of those big orange water containers you see folks hauling to soccer games and such. If I filled them, would they store well? I can empty and refill with my well water every few months or whatever.

    Thanks again everyone. My husband and I really feel the need to be stocked up and prepared for anything at this point.
     
  19. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Jean, I think if I had a source of water I would invest in some kind of filtering system rather than try to store enough drinking water. Especially for so many people. You can make a slow sand filter that does not cost very much. Prob cheaper than even one of the orange drinking water containers.

    Distilled water is ok to drink, even for babies. It will taste flat tho.
     
  20. Quiver0f10

    Quiver0f10 Well-Known Member

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    Good idea, we will look into this option too. Would probably make the mosts sense.